The Observer (UK)'s Scores

  • Music
For 1,381 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 36% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 61% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 Let Them Eat Chaos
Lowest review score: 20 Since I Saw You Last
Score distribution:
1381 music reviews
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It is a thoroughly unironic, seriously fun, rock record, in which seizing the day (well, the night), settling scores and the importance of making one's own money are explored in detail, with leering electric guitar and crashing kit.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    However good the other tracks are here, it's her indomitable track with Nicki Minaj, I'm Out, that powers this album.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Francis glides along, deliciously unresolved about a relationship. The hype was not wrong.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The 71-year-old Texan returns with a striking set of songs that typify his drollery and open-heartedness, all delivered with easy-rolling grace.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's only later that you realise Franz Ferdinand's fourth isn't just a return to form but a tuneful meditation on death, decay and the void.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    His trademark reticence (both this and 2010's Earl begin with voices needling him to speak) means he gives away too many verses: the best tracks are him and him alone.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The longer you listen, the more these disparate influences and structured elements coalesce into a very cogent record.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    In short, it has the kind of beauty that sees you playing it, and only it, for the next three weeks.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The closing Ragtime offers a happy ending of sorts, but this is too honest a record about unhappiness and grief to deliver a neat, redemptive conclusion.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    AM
    There is a depth--a willingness to experiment, a refusal to be pigeonholed--that rewards repeated listens and makes this their most coherent, most satisfying album since their debut. Where they go next is anybody's guess.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Each song is presented as a character sketch, and while the stories are impressionistic, often opaque, they feel richly textured: they live and breathe.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    She's irrepressible and the record sparkles with personality and elan, sealing her as a pop star worthy of the illustrious company she keeps.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The result is a seductive layering of glittering, MOR surfaces, ambient textures and a deep, aching undertow.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The arrangements on Dream River are almost as eloquent as his lyrics.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The result, improbably, is their best set in years.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Throughout, he remains the master of bluesy honky-tonking and surprising modulations that he always has been.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Seventy-two not out: a great record.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Those allergic to smooth pop-rock may find Days Are Gone hard going. Paradoxically, given this is an album of clever mash-ups, Haim's one straight-up R&B tune might actually be their best.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Arcade Fire's fourth album is pure death disco: a pulsating, electronic work, heavy of theme but light on its feet.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Each song is coloured with a knowing intelligence and it all comes from her voice.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    An (almost) unexpected pleasure.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A worthy homage.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Her collaboration here with production wunderkind (and fellow Los Angeleno) Ariel Rechtshaid has brought her angry, grungy side to the fore. It was worth the wait.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Despite the undercurrents of melancholia, Antiphon is another impeccably realised meld of bucolic 70s folk and radio-friendly soft rock, as warm and assured as it is adventurous.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    For all its contradictions and eccentricities, Matangi (the title links MIA with her near-namesake deity, a ghetto-dwelling Hindu goddess of music) feels more fully realised than the previous albums.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The soundtrack delivers a faithful sample of Bleecker Street's earnest, antique folkery, ably sung by actor Oscar Isaac, Justin Timberlake, Marcus Mumford and others.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    After years of toying around, Hynes may have finally found the sound that suits him best.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The results are frequently exquisite.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Even when battering his piano strings with a toilet brush, Frahm creates something mesmerising.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    There are beautiful moments.