The Telegraph (UK)'s Scores

  • Music
For 650 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 65% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 31% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.5 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 75
Highest review score: 100 Over and Even
Lowest review score: 20 Killer Sounds
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 2 out of 650
650 music reviews
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    There is, as Bush intended, much more air around the songs, which can reduce their original, raw intensity but also gives them a more mature, lingering potency.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Let's hope the slightly odd CD cover image does not put anyone off discovering the music held within because Jarosz has produced a fine album.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Her uncompromising, June Taboresque alto and imaginative, original material--from ye olde narrative ballads to modern love songs--are enduringly seductive.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    After an opinion-dividing experimental phase with 2009's Humbug, roar back to melodic life on their fourth album.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    On his fifth album, he seizes the mainstream jugular with a lushly romantic, brightly orchestrated and delightfully optimistic collection of epic love songs.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Her fifth record is dark, even by her standards, full of bitterness and pessimism.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The resulting guitar pop sound is more professional and commercial than the Alabama duo's formerly more playful style, but thanks to a wealth of well-written songs, fans of old and new should be equally entertained.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The two make a fine vocal duo, but even more astonishing is their instrumental virtuosity.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Cleverly, the arrangements draw attention to what richly layered songs Basement Jaxx have.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Overall, there's less headbanging potential here than on their finest moment – 2001's Grammy-winning song Boss of Me from Malcolm in the Middle – but it doesn't matter. This is still a brilliant summer listen.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    They're still chronicling gangster life, albeit a former one, but the beats are now funkier, offering a surprisingly accessible counterpoint to the cinematic, bloodthirsty narratives of star rapper Ghostface Killah. His caustic delivery propels the best tracks here.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Backed by his father's old orchestra, Fela Kuti's son Seun shows how afrobeat should be played: its irrepressible funky surge offset by truly scorching brass fanfares.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The result is furiously syncopated, no-holds-barred rock made marvellously strange by Camara's squawking fiddle and invocatory singing.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    His sound has matured considerably: he's less intent on blowing your ears off with dancehall's battery, than offering his own, still highly piquant take on slow-grind R&B.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This fifth album trades their signature Fender Stratocaster rock sound for hard-plucked acoustic guitars and lutes, conveying a majestic sense of space, the feeling that the music will unfold at its own pace, however long it takes.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Songs And Stories is plenty good enough to be going on with.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's a fun-loving, tune-heavy indie/punk/pop romp, with girlie la-la harmonies, a none-more-cheesy organ sound, and welcome vocal echoes of Britpop femmes Elastica and new wave heroine Lene Lovich.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The air is predictably valedictory, freighted with reflections on love, faith and intimations of mortality. 'Don't go to any trouble/You know I won't be here long . . . ' he sings in Westerberg's Any Trouble - in a voice as strong and clear as a bell.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Nick Lowe is pop's master of pastiche, and this delightful collection of country bar-room and lounge ballads sounds like a game of spot the musical references.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    His pensive, personal songs often evoke nocturnal drives on dusty highways with hypnotic allure.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Their fourth album is their best yet: bright, poppy and exciting.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's a heart-warming who's who.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A guest spot for Little Dragon's Yukimi Nagano adds spice to this unexpected feast.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The album is a beauty, none the less, the care put into it confirming Williams's exalted position in the tower of song.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The performances are superb.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    There is an avant garde boldness here that is, at times, quite amazing.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's surprisingly exhilarating stuff.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Lisa Hannigan is on confident form in her second solo release since the split from Damien Rice.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Great pop music with its big heart in the right place.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's hardly a novel idea to cover these songs, but Isaak's versions succeed through skilful arrangement, vibrant recording (mostly at Sun) and above all some remarkable vocal performances.