The Telegraph (UK)'s Scores

  • Music
For 659 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 65% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 32% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.5 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 76
Highest review score: 100 Culcha Vulcha
Lowest review score: 20 Killer Sounds
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 2 out of 659
659 music reviews
    • 61 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    She sounds like a woman, and an artist, who’s finally found herself.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The results rate with his best work, by turns reflective and attacking, on which lyrics sparkle and music breathes and flows with a sure touch.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    It is, in short, and as we might have expected, a work of genius.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    This is a terrific album, full of dignity.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    You Are Not Alone, her 2010 collaboration with Jeff Tweedy of Wilco, won Staples her first Grammy. The follow up is even better.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Electric is the second really fantastic pop-dance blast of the year.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    By re-recording the whole of Taylor Swift's 1989, the maverick alt country star has turned a world beating chart smash album into a tender masterpiece of bruised Americana, in the process emphasising the perfect songcraft and exposing the dark heart of emotion beating beneath Swift's gleaming surfaces.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    At every turn he unfolds the fists of self-pity into upturned palms of generosity.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    It may not be the kind of definitive album statement that will rock the music world to its foundations but it more than demonstrate that the world’s greatest and longest serving rock band have still got what it takes.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Lemonade is by far Beyoncé’s strongest album.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    On Over and Even, which was produced by Daniel Martin Moore, she also sings harmony with Will Oldham and Glen Dettinger and allied to riveting guitar work, as it is on My Only Trouble, the result is terrific.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Happily, the words are wonderful and Something More Than Free is an album that grows and grows on you. Producer Dave Cobb is in fine action again and gets the best from the settings behind Isbell's effecting voice. Some of the songs are simply splendid.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The Gouster [is] raised from the archives as the centre piece of a handsome new 12-CD box set, Who Can I Be Now? (1974-76). ... Finally given its moment in the light, The Gouster is unlikely to become a belated part of the canon, but it is nevertheless a welcome testament to the real heart beating at the centre of Bowie’s pop genius.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    You suspect that getting on the wrong side of White would be inadvisable. Thankfully, he has channelled his demons in Lazaretto to create one of the great break-up albums of recent years.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Prine is extraordinary, one of the most eloquent artists of modern times and seeing where it all started, in this super CD, really is something very special.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Bloodsports is bleeding good.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    This is an album that sounds like a world of music in itself.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Leonard Cohen’s 14th studio album is a bleak masterpiece for hard times from pop’s longest-serving poet.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Channel Orange is as dazzling as it is baffling, rarely staying still long enough to get a grip on.
    • 97 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The content is lovingly packaged in a box neatly dressed-up as one of those giant beat boxes hipsters used to lug around before the advent of the Sony Walkman and the digital revolution that followed.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    25
    25 is certainly the equal of its predecessor. What it sacrifices in youthful rawness it makes up in maturity and sheer class. Adele Adkins has taken her time over her third album and it shows.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    It is not reinventing the pop wheel but everything is done with an appealing combination of taste and passion.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    There’s a lot of fun to be had in the snap ’n’ flex with which Kiedis flips out this nonsense. He and Flea (now 53) clearly know how daft they are yet you can also hear how happy they sound to still be pogoing along.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Hynes's voice is refined into an emotive croon. Inventive pop from a bright indie talent.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    From the clarion call of The Hosting Of The Shee to the haunting The Faery's Last Song, the result is a fabulous feast of words and music.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The result is the gorgeous Tomorrow is My Turn, which shows off the full singing range and power of the frontwoman for innovative string-band trio the Carolina Chocolate Drops.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    This isn't mere cleverness, it's instinctive musicality, buoyed up by three other fine players.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The Decemberists blend rock and folk well (there's even a nod to the famous Raggle Taggle Gypsy Man in a riff on Rox In The Box) and the songwriting crafts pastoral and emotional imaginery into tight-knit, attractive songs. This album is an unexpected treat.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    At first listen it sounds messy, but the more you play it, the more inspired and essential each brutal interruption becomes.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Content is their best record since the late-Seventies, packed with savagely danceable riffs and rousingly incisive lyrics about consumerism, domestic fragmentation and political resistance.