The Telegraph (UK)'s Scores

  • Music
For 512 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 64% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 33% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.7 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 74
Highest review score: 100 Synthetica
Lowest review score: 20 At Your Inconvenience
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 2 out of 512
512 music reviews
    • 77 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The Decemberists blend rock and folk well (there's even a nod to the famous Raggle Taggle Gypsy Man in a riff on Rox In The Box) and the songwriting crafts pastoral and emotional imaginery into tight-knit, attractive songs. This album is an unexpected treat.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Content is their best record since the late-Seventies, packed with savagely danceable riffs and rousingly incisive lyrics about consumerism, domestic fragmentation and political resistance.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    21
    Atkins makes the material sound genuine, largely because it is perfect for her. Where previously her slight, observational songs seemed barely able to carry her powerful voice, the emotional and musical heft of these styles enables her to really spread her vocal wings.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    For all its despair at the cost of war, this is not a protest record, rather a consideration of our place in the greater scheme of things.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Their last album, The Seldom Seen Kid, managed the rare feat of winning the Mercury prize and huge public affection. So how do Elbow follow it? With continued greatness and without fuss.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    This album is a musical gumbo: a rich, surprising and ultimately satisfying stew of Simon's folk, rock and pop influences from all over the world.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    This isn't mere cleverness, it's instinctive musicality, buoyed up by three other fine players.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    This fabulous box-set finally unites the trilogy. Tragic, poignant, yet uplifting, Newbury's tough-guy singing will often inexorably reduce the listener to tears.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    There cannot be another musical duet around at the moment who are able to make two acoustic guitars and two voices produce a sound that is so subtle and yet powerful.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Though consistently ground-breaking and lyrically challenging, Ritual Union never feels like hard work.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Perhaps the most extraordinary achievement of this funny, hard-hitting, thrilling album is that it actually sounds like a coherent and purposeful piece of work, a statement of what hip hop can mean, and where it can go.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Despite the subject matter, this is an invigorating celebration of the joys of great songwriting and proof of the power of one man and his piano.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The song kick-starts the album's powerful sense of forward motion, of a woman struggling to wrestle free from expectations, relationships and religious convention.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Hynes's voice is refined into an emotive croon. Inventive pop from a bright indie talent.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Her approach is confident and challenging, but not arch – several direct, haunting love songs are as delicate and affecting as any Adele tear-jerker.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The sound of the album is deliberately vibrant and varied.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    It's an album undiminished by time, that can still make me want to throw myself around an imaginary mosh pit or curl up in a fetal ball.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Underneath the almost soporifically smooth old-soul and country polish, Adams's ear for a delicate melody and feel for the shadowy nuances of emotion give this latest chapter beautiful depth.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    From the clarion call of The Hosting Of The Shee to the haunting The Faery's Last Song, the result is a fabulous feast of words and music.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    It's surprisingly accessible, hypnotic and beautiful if you give it time and concentration.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Does it succeed in his aim? Triumphantly. With bells on. Tinker bells, even.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The wild, rattling bawlers are each distinctively turbocharged with reckless and richly textured energy, while the ballads run poignantly on their rims, leaking emotion.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    High Flying Birds is the best collection of Gallagher tunes since his Morning Glory days.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Bush is still making music that intrudes and abducts.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Prine is extraordinary, one of the most eloquent artists of modern times and seeing where it all started, in this super CD, really is something very special.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    It is, in short, and as we might have expected, a work of genius.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    This is a record Guy Clark can surely be proud to have as a tribute.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Beautifully nuanced collage of soulfully rocking flavours.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    An extraordinary debut from a new British-based band who combine a gipsy swagger with tremulous sensitivity and gothic rock drama.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Mixing up elements of rock, pop, blues, jazz, soul and funk, each song finds its way into a supple groove and just bounces around there as though Amadou's guitar strings and Mariam's vocal chords were made of musical elastic.