The Telegraph (UK)'s Scores

  • Music
For 659 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 65% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 32% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.5 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 76
Highest review score: 100 Strangers
Lowest review score: 20 Killer Sounds
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 2 out of 659
659 music reviews
    • 92 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The five and a half hours of unreleased demos/live recordings do give a warmly inclusive insider's feel but there's nothing I'd listen to more than a couple of times.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    There are good things here, but nothing especially new.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    There is a neat cover of Creedence’s Have You Ever Seen the Rain but the best songs are her own heartfelt and brooding country ones.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Full of groove and grit, it's raw and enjoyable.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Yet for all its exuberant DIY spirit, Young Fathers’ songs sound like another bunch of interesting demos, full of passion, spontaneity and left-field inspiration, but too often failing to really nail the song or message down.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The result is never maudlin, but big, bouncy and entertaining.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Although some of his anecdotes could drag on repeated listening, he is an engaging raconteur.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It's a sprawling beast of an album and a remarkable piece of creativety from 68-year-old Russell.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Although something of a melting pot, this is an original and accessible album, blending world influences with old time American music.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Blending hi-tech and lo-fi, modern synthesised sound and old-fashioned song writing, her work plumbs torrid emotional depths, similar to alt-rock stars such as Lou Barlow.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    While Touré acquits himself imaginatively in a variety of settings, the whirring, jangling opener Sokosondou, with just his own musicians, feels the most compelling track.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    For every perfectly observed vignette of English life (Sunny Afternoon, Autumn Almanac) and pithily satirical narrative (Village Green Preservation Society, Dead End Kids) there's a clunking, unwieldy, elaborate novelty song (Supersonic Rocket Ship, Skin & Bone).
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    He brings real feeling to his own compositions such as Let Me Sleep (At the end of a Dream).
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    An enjoyable and soulful album, the highlight of which is the title track Indian Ocean.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    There is plenty of passion in songs about Tennessee striking miners in the Thirties, or about the English Civil War.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Rod Picott achieves his aim of making an authentic studio version of his live shows in his new album Fortune. The material is sometimes contemporary.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Some of it is boring and the two songs from his George Harrison session chug along forgettably. But I’d swap my unloved copy of Self Portrait for this box set any day.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    There's a nourishing warmth in their bittersweet laments.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Nothing on this, her fourth album, rivals that hit [1234] for toe-tapping immediacy, but it is rich in atmospheric beauty.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It's a fully-acoustic affair (guitar, piano, upright bass, drums, etc), with a luxurious, live-combo presence and some gruff musings on time, humanity and music.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Failing to commandeer some stormy rockers, Faithfull proves most evocative on a couple of tender, stripped back ballads, Love More Or Less (written with Tom McRae) and Nick Cave collaboration Deep Water.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Occasional lines jerk out of the mix as Dylan struggles for control of his vocal chords. But his unique phrasing and delivery is usually right on the nose of the song’s meaning.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    One Breath may not be a masterpiece but it does enough to suggest she has a chance of making one someday.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    This began life as an art project at Somerset House, with Harvey composing and recording in a makeshift studio before a viewing public. Such pressurised circumstances might explain the absence of any sense of real pleasure in the finished work. I don’t hesitate to hail it as impressive but it does feel more civic project than classic album.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    D
    The confidence of this Texan trio's last effort (2009's Fits) is lacking on their first major-label release.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It's a loose album, an indulgent album, and not all likeable but, unlike any other outfit of their tenure, they maintain a raw punch as if recording in a local bar for the sheer blast of it.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    She shows in Everything Changes that she can keep up with the times.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The result is both silkily seductive and moodily narcissistic.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    ADespite occasionally drawing blood, The Haunted Man doesn't live up to its stripped and dangerous cover, often retreating to gambol about in the backwaters of Khan's imagination.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The Dreamer is occasionally powerful and moving as James ranges across memorable songs including Otis Redding's Champagne & Wine.