The Telegraph (UK)'s Scores

  • Music
For 664 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 65% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 32% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.5 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 76
Highest review score: 100 An Appointment with Mr. Yeats
Lowest review score: 20 At Your Inconvenience
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 2 out of 664
664 music reviews
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The album has to be judged a late-period triumph, even if I am not entirely convinced The Voice's avuncular judge is quite as deep as the material demands.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Atlanta-based producer Ben H Allen (who has worked with Animal Collective and CeeLo Green) has beefed up their sound, although a taste for clean sonic lines and cheesy keyboards retains a power to grate.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Red
    It's frustrating, then, when Swift reverts back to type. Too many of the songs on this bloated 16-track album revisit the gently strummed verses and characterless choruses of her previous work.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Their bluesy approach doesn't draw anything truly rich and strange from their vintage Cambodian material.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The album is the second in the four-volume Nomad series and the Cowboy Junkies said they felt they owed Chesnutt something. They have paid their debt in handsome fashion.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    A
    Agnetha: still as seductively normal, beautifully boring and enigmatically familiar as ever.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Although the 18 tracks (12 of which are co-credited to Wright) are short on catchy tunes, it’s still an effective 53-minute trip.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The lyrics cleverly incorporate words and ideas from each programme. But a soundtrack featuring all the oddball artists from the series would have been more interesting.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The fifth album by Great Lake Swimmers, called New Wild Everywhere, is melodic and graceful.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It is a lovely Valentine record, if you favour melancholic songs about missed chances. The set feels overfamiliar, though, drawing heavily on classic Seventies ballads by the Carpenters, Eagles, Elton John and 10CC.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It may be nothing more than an exercise in maintaining the brand of the 21st Century’s most vacant superstar but, in its perfectly distilled empty pleasures, Glory might just be Britney’s masterpiece.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It's a loose album, an indulgent album, and not all likeable but, unlike any other outfit of their tenure, they maintain a raw punch as if recording in a local bar for the sheer blast of it.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The result is a quirky and poignant little time capsule.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Wilson has nothing wildly original to say about the state of modern Britain, but sounds authentically angry on behalf of people on minimum wage or zero-hours jobs.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The result is never maudlin, but big, bouncy and entertaining.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    [It's] orchestrally enhanced, romantic balladry of fair beauty.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    A flat-out belter of the Adele/Florence school, surrounded variously by daft orchestral sturm-und-drang and flimsy ProTools disco/house. Better may come.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The New Yorker's music has become less urgent and original ... This album sounds the musical equivalent of being chauffeur driven around Jay-Z's kingdom in an air conditioned, bullet-proofed executive limo while the man himself reclines his plush leisure seat beside you, casually pointing out the scenes of his former glories.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    She shows in Everything Changes that she can keep up with the times.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    For Kings of Leon to remain interesting and relevant, they need to stop trying to be the band the music business seems to want them to be and start following Caleb Followill’s muse wherever it leads.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Sparsely arranged around piano, guitar and his gruff vocals, it's sombre, but affecting.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It may be nothing new but her punchy, uplifting set of pastiche Sixties and Seventies soul, r’n’b and disco is perfectly pitched with just an appealing hint of exaggeration.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Athough the two old giants of country music can't hit all the notes of youth their phrasing is neat and nuanced on their fourth album together.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It's all precisely mixed and impressively textured, but lacks Blake's more raw, emotional connection.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Recommended for the drive home from festivals.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Elusive and ethereal, it hints at the late night soulscapes of the Blue Nile but remains boldly, if at times frustratingly, out of focus.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    FFS
    As if set free from seriousness, they knock out some polished, off-kilter pop gems about inadequate individuals.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    A nice comeback album.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Full of groove and grit, it's raw and enjoyable.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It's all an interesting time capsule and what makes it worthwhile for Cash fans is that there are 26 previously unreleased tracks. Disc 2 sounds a tad more produced but a song about dismissing a former lover--Wide Open Road--and the jaunty Five Minutes To Live are treats.