Time Out London's Scores

  • Movies
For 433 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 46% higher than the average critic
  • 5% same as the average critic
  • 49% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.5 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 62
Lowest review score: 20 The Big Wedding
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 15 out of 433
433 movie reviews
  1. Rush is fast, slippery, stormy and dangerous.
  2. Maybe an hour would have been enough, but even the slower patches have charm to burn.
  3. Bell goes easy on the preaching and heavy on the laughs without losing her feminist message.
  4. Though it’s most successful as a character study, the movie also works as an unusually honest variation on the traditional cinematic love story (it rings especially true on the difficulties of starting over after years of settled family life).
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    As a director, Gordon-Levitt demonstrates considerable technical flair through stylistic flourishes and coaxes great performances out of his co-stars, while he remains centre stage throughout.
  5. The casting of comedian Koechner as the sleazy host is a masterstroke, but all four actors relish the salty dialogue and farcical cruelty, as the film moves towards a bleak but satisfying ending.
  6. This is easily Coppola’s funniest film. Leslie Mann is hilarious as Nicki’s phony spiritual mum.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It can be very funny, but there’s a bittersweet streak underpinning even the lightest moments.
  7. Everyone has a different story. I found myself holding my breath listening to them talk. The story twists like a thriller.
  8. The film keeps its good-evil borders compellingly supple, at least until a wobbly finale that requires Sarah to act like the Hollywood heroine she has so strenuously avoided becoming. It’s a minor blot on a film otherwise propulsively alive with prickly politics.
  9. This is a tighter, smarter film than either Shaun of the Dead or Hot Fuzz, and buried beneath all the blue-goo aliens and terrible punning is a heartfelt meditation on the perils and pleasures of nostalgia.
  10. You won’t know whether to laugh or cry.
  11. The LEGO Movie is sheer joy: the script is witty, the satire surprisingly pointed and the animation tactile and imaginative.
  12. Tracks might be a bit slow for some, but it’s one of those films that quietly creeps up on you.
  13. Feels both modern and traditional – a halfway house between the broodier Nolan way of shaking things up and the louder, bone-crunching style that director Zack Snyder established with films such as ‘300’ and ‘Sucker Punch’. Man of Steel is punchy, engaging and fun, even if it slips into a final 45 minutes of explosions and fights during which reason starts to vanish and the science gets muddy.
  14. Lovering’s taut direction and editor Jon Amos’s skilfully modulated cutting wring the maximum suspense from cinematographer David Katznelson’s multi-camera set-ups, tapping into deep-rooted psychological and primal fears.
  15. Her
    Her is a keeper of a film, quietly dazzling.
  16. Abrahamson has pulled off something quietly remarkable: a study of morality which never feels like a treatise, a bracingly realistic film about teenagers which never becomes patronising and a gripping melodrama which swerves sentiment. He may also have unearthed a genuine star.
  17. It’s infuriatingly irresistible.
  18. It’s lightly played, often very funny and shot all over Paris with energy and wit, and boosted by superb, inquiring turns from Broadbent and Duncan.
  19. What makes it special is that it’s not another romance about finding a man. It’s about finding your people, about being a bit lost in your twenties and not knowing who you are or what you want to be. And it’s got bucketfuls of charm.
  20. You’ll walk out of this electrifying documentary about the Arab Spring with your blood boiling.
  21. One of the most pleasing things about Blue Jasmine is that it feels truly knotty and never obvious in how it unfolds.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This unnerving and enigmatic debut feature from Israeli director Nadav Lapid trains its steely focus on the group dynamics of the cops and robbers rather than asking us to get swept along in the specifics of their violence travails.
  22. Sometimes you find yourself wishing for an alternative version of the film unfolding before your eyes. ‘Belle’ is a good-looking and exceedingly polite film where perhaps a more complex one with less good manners would have been better.
  23. Using home-video footage and talking-head interviews, Dinosaur 13 dramatically depicts the thrill of archaeological discovery. But the overbearing soundtrack and shots of weeping palaeontologists do feel a touch manipulative.
  24. A Hijacking’ is gripping in the way the best Danish TV is – in its no-frills authenticity.
  25. Folman’s vision is just too personal and obtuse, and the result can feel rather like watching someone else drop acid, enjoying their giddy descriptions of all the pretty colours but unable to fully engage.
  26. Mud
    It’s a broader, starrier project than either of Nichols’s previous films, and he handles the transition to the major league with relative confidence.

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