Time Out New York's Scores

  • Movies
For 2,542 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 32% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 66% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 55
Highest review score: 100 We Are the Best!
Lowest review score: 0 Vampires Suck
Score distribution:
2,542 movie reviews
  1. By the end, you feel curiously closer to the performer and her process without having any clue how you got there. It's exhilarating.
  2. Sally Hawkins cruises into her new movie the same way she did her breakthrough, "Happy-Go-Lucky."
  3. You still leave hoping he ultimately found peace and enlightenment, two things he graciously gave to those of us who hung on his every word.
  4. To make a Western now is in itself a subversive act. Improving, embellishing and reclaiming an old-fashioned oater from the vintage studio-cheese bin with such humor and vigor seems truly, truly ballsy.
  5. Phillips goes too far sometimes (border-jail breakout?), but his new direction is promising.
  6. There's a darker, fanatical side to blindness too-and this is the movie to show it. Leave all judgments behind.
  7. Chomet builds this beguiling symphony of sadness to a poignant finale that does ample justice to the many layers of Tati's tale, both in text and out.
  8. Summer Wars surprisingly celebrates togetherness and bravery as much as binary-mathematics expertise, all helped along by a kick-ass synthesis of traditional hand-drawn scenes and fluid, rainbow-explosive CG artistry.
  9. Uniting Sacha Baron Cohen's daredevilry with Werner Herzog's bombast, Brügger aims to expose "the evilness of North Korea" with a gloriously incoherent, kazoo-and-whoopee-cushion–inflected stage show starring a self-proclaimed "spastic."
  10. Suleiman can be criticized for failing, ever so slightly, at crafting an overall structure-his latest, based on his dad's diary and other memories, is an autobiographical story of exile and return that skips like a stone over water, fleetly but not so deeply. Still, this is a welcome example of kitsch wedded to serious indictment.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Never saccharine, My Dog Tulip does justice to the rare experience of heartfelt, mutual love in any form
  11. Do you like movies about gladiators? Well, lend me your ears: The Eagle will more than gratify your sword-and-sandal cravings.
  12. Yun is quite simply spectacular as a woman who holds steadfastly on to her dignity and empathy, even in the face of unspeakable tragedy.
  13. Unpacks the man's story with a dramatic flair that might be mistaken for Zoolanderiffic, if it weren't so aptly accessible.
  14. What elevates The Sky Turns beyond a lovely little elegy and into the realm of greatness is Álvarez's refusal to shape the film as a tragedy.
  15. Though his results are sometimes raw, Dolan seems to be chronicling heartache as he discovers it. Indulge him.
  16. Godly as the monks are, they are still human-which makes their ultimate sacrifice all the more devastating.
  17. It's a quietly witty film, much like the dude himself.
  18. Her (Binoche) award-winning performance is reason alone to dive into such intellectual gamesmanship. (She can suggest an entire emotional arc with one facial tic.)
  19. New Yorkers and those who've been following the neighborhood's plight know exactly how this ends; at the very least, Paravel and Sniadecki have preserved the memory of what was. Sometimes, that's the most you can do.
  20. The film builds to a shattering climax that works precisely because all involved fully embrace the melodrama. Be sure to bring Kleenex.
  21. A moving meditation on history, knowledge and mortality.
  22. Names get checked, baby-faced future celebrities like Vincent Gallo and Steve Buscemi make cameos, and various cross-pollinations between below–14th Street mavericks are clarified.
  23. The film suddenly gains in power, until it fulfills the promise of its title with hard-hitting compassion and a crystal-clear sense of grace.
  24. It's a sickening but stunning portrait of combat that looks past notions of bravery or brutality, guilt or innocence, to bear witness to a thoroughly besieged humanity.
  25. A collective sense of psychological turmoil seems to weigh heavily on the entire country as much as Champ, reaching critical mass once chaos creeps into the city-leading to a quiet, climactic walk into darkness that earns the right to be called haunting.
  26. The film isn't blinded by Candy's beauty and celebrity; it digs critically, if still empathetically, beneath.
  27. The Arbor's pummeling second half begins with the collapse of its celebrity subject; the following spirals of self-destruction make you suspect that some childhoods are simply too hard to escape. Tough, worthy stuff.
  28. Fantastical is what we get: Cameraman is filled with Cardiff's achingly beautiful work.
  29. As engrossing as it is maddening, Pierre Thoretton's documentary on the sale of Yves Saint Laurent's extensive art collection is perched somewhere between a sanded-edged official portrait and a keen examination of affluence run amok.

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