Time's Scores

For 605 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 39% higher than the average critic
  • 8% same as the average critic
  • 53% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 1.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 Louie: Season 4
Lowest review score: 0 Bridalplasty: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 369
  2. Negative: 0 out of 369
369 tv reviews
  1. For fans, Looking‘s conclusion will be welcome. For the uninitiated, it’s a moodily made argument to check out a series that deserves a long afterlife.
  2. Less frenetic than Lucy, more mature than Mary, Alley has a shot at being TV's all-time funny woman.
  3. It is, in other words, one more cable reality show about fabulous women. But in this case, the same old reality show is a refreshing change.
  4. Underground rises to the challenge with urgent storytelling and a heavy dose of contemporary edge.
  5. There is no roadmap for this kind of show, and it could easily fall apart quickly. But I will say this for The Last Man on Earth: it does not seem like the sort of thing that would be a primetime network sitcom. And that’s precisely why it should be one.
  6. Smart fun from the start, managing impressive spectacle even if it doesn’t have the visual firepower of the most epic Thrones episodes.
  7. What works about The Honorable Woman is how well its particular story and larger themes echo each other: trust and mistrust, hope and disappointment, resentment and revenge, repeating for generations.
  8. As homage to the unclean gymnastics of p.r., Spin City is certainly the season's most believable new sitcom. And also by far the best.
  9. The people around Jackie made me stick with this show even when its main storyline was going nowhere, but now that it's committed to really engaging with its title character, it's become appointment TV for me again.
  10. Interspersed with cover songs, Spectacle is an engaging showcase for a curious mind.
  11. The show is nourished by Toobin’s contemporaneous reporting, which dives deep into the supporting characters’ motivations.... Some viewers might be turned off by Crime Story’s focus on celebrity and its winking references to the family of Simpson defense attorney Robert Kardashian (Friends star David Schwimmer), of which there are too many. The point, though, stands: the Simpson trial was fueled by fame and, troublingly, generated fame for those involved.
  12. The conceit is absurd, to be sure; the focus on ill-suited lovebirds-in-the-making, well worn. But the show somehow manages to mine subversive comedy from this unpromising vein.
  13. It's far-fetched. It's outlandish. You will think you are too smart to get suckered in by it, but give it a few minutes and you will be proved wrong.
  14. If The Walking Dead can build on its promise and run with these ideas, along with unflinching gross-out thrills, it can tell a doomsday story with all the things zombies crave: brains, guts and heart.
  15. Odd Mom Out remains one of the summer’s most delightful shows--and a comedy with meaningful subversive bite.
  16. In its second season, Better Call Saul allows us into a new world of complexity by deepening one of the show’s pivotal relationships. It’s the best-case scenario for a spin-off: a show that occupies a familiar world but opens up entirely new themes.
  17. The result is a new-style western that's both entertaining and as mesmerizing as Givens' cold-blooded speech to the crook with the scattergun.
  18. This brilliantly executed concept--the title, the casting, the squiggly tornado CGI--was the most delicious chum, and we are creatures of instinct.
  19. On its own, the show’s concept might have just been a throwaway 30 Rock subplot; what sustains it is how it applies the concept of unbreakability beyond Kimmy. Each character is a survivor.
  20. While it's a rough, sometimes grim, process, it feels that much more well-earned when, at the end of the first episode, one student, Bobby–who struggled to speak for himself in mock interviews–visits a future class to report that he's held a carpentry job for a month.
  21. The Wiz is by far NBC’s most sophisticated live musical broadcast yet; it’s also one that felt, movingly, of its time.
  22. It subversively places white resentment at its center and dares us to look away, telling us that arson, violence, and outright bigotry are light comedy even as something in our minds tells us that’s not quite right. The show comes closer, in its twisted way, to suggesting why Americans embrace the politics of division than does much on-the-ground journalism.
  23. Some elements are so Showtime-comedy-like (the eccentric teen child, e.g.) as to seem a little repetitive. But the show depends above all on Laura Linney's performance, and so far it's entrancing.
  24. While it's not as knock-your-socks-off as the pilot (while retaining some of the same problems), it continues to show why, at its best, this is the freshest and most joyful new show of the year.
  25. Rubicon is not a show for the impatience, and it has the kind of ambitions that could set viewers up for a letdown. But so far, I admire its intelligence.
  26. The morals of this provocative show are as intriguing as its cases.
  27. Prohibition provides a detailed, engaging postmortem of a very, very bad idea.
  28. It's intriguing and promising that season four kicks off with another detour–this time into the past–that connects to Harlan County here and now.
  29. The pilot... iis actually the least funny of the three episodes I saw; in the other two, "Sarah" and the other characters are much better developed and the stories hang together better. Still, it's an acquired tastelessness.
  30. The show becomes more engrossing as is spins out from her story, fleshing out the inmates, their backstories, and their alliances. You may come for the culture-clash cringe-comedy; it’s the real human stories that will have you captivated.

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