Time's Scores

For 628 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 39% higher than the average critic
  • 7% same as the average critic
  • 54% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 1.3 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 Louie: Season 4
Lowest review score: 0 Bridalplasty: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 380
  2. Negative: 0 out of 380
380 tv reviews
  1. The echoes of To Kill a Mockingbird and The Member of the Wedding are hard to miss, and the show's two-hour pilot moves as slowly as, well, molasses in January. Yet producers Joshua Brand and John Falsey (St. Elsewhere, Northern Exposure) have created a drama of rich texture, few tricks and much truth.
  2. The first episode is zippy, slick-looking, and Whedonistically funny. It also seems much more limited in its ambitions than Whedon’s past TV shows; it seems to be set up largely as a procedural in which the agents defuse various threats of the week.
  3. As entertainment, The Apprentice is not quite Survivor--hype aside, Manhattan can't out-jungle the jungle--but it's much more exciting than Burnett's take on the dining business in The Restaurant. The challenges, which make up the bulk of the episodes, are cleverly designed and guarantee dramatic sparks.
  4. This is all a long way of saying I'm glad to see that, in SoA's fourth-season debut, the show hasn't just returned to its setting of Charming, California. It also returns, slowly, to Jax's realization that he doesn't want his life to be Abel's, and that he wants a way out.
  5. In the end, however, Homicide doesn't stand out in bold enough relief from TV's background clutter. The characters are too pat, their conflicts too predictable.
  6. It toys with the sitcom format in ways both inventive (the little flourishes of animation that divide scenes) and annoying (the episode outtakes that run under the closing credits).
  7. Curb, meanwhile, stopped being appointment viewing for me a couple seasons ago, but it threatens to become so again.
  8. Some of the supporting characters need work (especially a too sitcommy administrator played by Anna Deavere Smith), and some patients-of-the-week veer into clichés. But Falco is outstanding as a living reminder that you meet angels only in the next life.
  9. But mostly, the show improved--in my eyes, anyway--by doing well enough by what was good about it that I could simply ignore the weaker stuff.
  10. Summer Heights High is not a perfect comedy, and those offended by crossed boundaries will feel their boundaries crossed. But it's a welcome, if sometimes familiar, HBO comedy while we wait for the return of "Flight of the Conchords."
  11. It's a refreshing take and an interesting effort, if finally not quite a compelling one.
  12. The Parks and Recreation pilot is funny, with mounds of potential. Its problem is that it seems to be actively downplaying its distinctiveness by emphasizing the surface resemblance to The Office.
  13. Predictable but pithy, Wife takes itself no more seriously than the Hollywood-haves it skewers.
  14. There are, maybe, some hopeful signs. The series seems to have given up on trying to create a bigger WMD for every season, which it needed to do. The political subplot—new president Cherry Jones wants a humanitarian invasion of a Darfur-like African country but is being undermined—is intriguing and a bit different for the show.
  15. In all, not a great debut, but one with potential, and it shows off Grier's versatility well.
  16. Because of Lewis' brilliant portrayal of the eccentric Charlie, the show is perfectly enjoyable. It's just not compelling, mainly because the ongoing story of Charlie's search for justice is so isolated from the rest of the show that it seems meant for bathroom and snack breaks.
  17. Kings is fascinating pretentious hoo-ha.
  18. it's a solid episode of The Office, which picks up with the Pam's pregnancy storyline the last season ended on, though I won't get into the details of how.
  19. In the early Season 2 episodes, the strain shows in the songs, which service the plot but aren't as memorable as the old ones. But the scripts are as funny and tightly written as ever.
  20. The marvel is that anyone is still watching after the plodding premiere episode. ... Succeeding episodes have been better, mainly because they have emphasized the show's homespun attractions. One is a talking dolphin named Darwin... The other is a Star Trek-like combination of imaginative sci-fi story lines and the cozy ethos of Wagon Train.
  21. The writing is uneven... but the idea is audacious enough to keep you following the loose threads.
  22. It's a self-important but frequently entertaining mix of Ben Casey melodrama and St. Elsewhere-style modernism.
  23. If you don't want or need to be surprised, it's a pretty well-paced, gorgeously shot and fast-moving pilot, and Maggie Q, who is practically computer-designed to play the role, seems worth all the publicity investment The CW has placed in her.
    • Time
  24. There are at least the slivers of promise that the show could get better. Neff is amiably charming, Dillahunt and Plimpton give their characters a realism that belies the pilot's often-contemptuous jokes, and maybe 20% of the first episode shows a sweet-heartedness that rises above the easy white-trash humor.
  25. The cast is startlingly good... given that the actors have to deliver lines like "I think we're looking at a four-dimensional object--in three- dimensional space!"
  26. Cinema Verite is not a bad movie at all but its failing is an ironic one: it smooths out the messiness and non sequiturs of real life to fit its story into a neat feature-film arc.
  27. The pilot is aiming for a balance of dark humor, heart and flat-out funny that it doesn't quite manage.
  28. You may feel the faith-and-family themes could be handled better on cable--mainly because they have been.
  29. But after five episodes, Ray Donovan is still some good performances in search of a show. It feels made up of pieces of other antihero dramas--a little Sopranos here, a little Brotherhood there, even a little Entourage around the edges. Ray is so far too much a cipher to be an engaging focal character, and his flaws and failings are those of so many middle-aged cable ass-kickers in the past decade.
  30. Rock Center may not be a ratings smash, and not all of its experiments may work. But the good news is, Williams and Stewart can both keep their day jobs.

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