Time's Scores

For 628 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 39% higher than the average critic
  • 7% same as the average critic
  • 54% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 1.3 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 Orange is the New Black: Season 4
Lowest review score: 0 I Wanna Marry Harry: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 380
  2. Negative: 0 out of 380
380 tv reviews
  1. This is law drama such as Boston Legal's David E. Kelley can only dream about.
  2. Superb. ... The three episodes of Five Came Back run a little over three hours total, but the time goes by like a shot.
  3. A top-flight cast, including Lizzy Caplan and Martin Starr (and this season, Megan Mullally, stepping in for Lynch), who make the show's scripts play like improv. Above all, the show's ambition to be both raunchily funny and emotionally real to characters who are watching their dreams get older one day at a time.
  4. I've seen two weeks of the season, and so far I'm rapt. In Treatment may be in uncharted ground with its new, original stories, but it remains a show that rewards patience, and patients.
  5. [The Wire's] attention to detail, plus a vast canvas of characters, makes for a dense boulder of a story that moves creakily for the first couple of hours. But once it gets rolling, it's irresistible because of the humanity creator-writer David Simon finds in his characters.
  6. It's ironic that NBC's most original sitcom in years is a remake, but who cares? The Office is a daring, unflinching take on very American workplace tensions.
  7. It's all breathtaking in much the way that you'd suspect.
  8. Funny, probing and unsentimental, House may shock the systems of viewers used to sweetie M.D.s like ER's Dr. Carter. But as an honest look at techno-medicine and the prerogatives of genius, it's a tonic.
  9. A satisfying, touching and excruciatingly funny severance package.
  10. Master of None, one of the most assured shows in recent memory, knows exactly what it’s doing.
  11. The early episodes of season three, though, find SoA retaining what there was to love about it--the well-drawn characters, including the strong women in SAMCRO and its orbit--while expanding the show as well.
  12. It is surely is Mamet’s strongest drama in ages, and a seductive, devious essay on the tortured celebrity soul.
  13. It is not just one of the most moving but also one of the funniest shows you will see this year: a sort of post-9/11 M*A*S*H.
  14. Not since Woody Allen's What's Up, Tiger Lily? has anyone had so much fun with bad movies.
  15. It’s a sumptuous pleasure to go through one doorway and another, feeling all the while the dawning knowledge that someday we will turn a corner, and come to the last.
  16. Stiller is capable of turning out a dead-on TV or movie parody, like his takeoff on Cape Fear, with a grownup Eddie Munster as the De Niro-esque psycho. But he rarely settles for the frisson of a good impersonation; his sketches usually give the satiric knife an extra twist or two.
  17. It’s not that that second What It’s About--the emotional heart of The Americans--is better, more noble than the first. But it’s the difference between an exciting thriller premise that flames out fast and a story with lasting power--demonstrates better than ever.
  18. The premise of ABC's Life on Mars is ludicrous but irresistible.
  19. Daisies has a timeless, picture-book look. It could be set today, in the '30s, in the '70s or in any other decade fond of saturated color. Like Chuck herself, it's a perfect candidate for a second chance: as glowing and lovable as the day we first met it.
  20. While refraining from slapping the comedy on too thick, creator David Chase has made Soprano's inward search surprisingly affecting.
  21. The charming pilot swerves quickly from the expected Bravo-reality-show-catfight scenario and becomes something more complicated and rewarding: a good-hearted comedy about an extended family (including Pete’s two ex-wives) figuring out how to make itself work on the fly.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's the strong cast, especially Bryce Dallas Howard as witty, strong-willed Rosalind, that gives this East-West fusion its flavor.
  22. As The Path reveals details of the faith's underpinnings--its punishments and fundraising methods, and the past its leader is running from--it becomes more rewarding.
  23. All this has the potential to be a little corny, but Ladies' is that rare show that manages to be uncynical without being cloying.
  24. The casting is strong all around, which helps pull the series through its weaker stretches, when it does start to drift into a morality play or an overwrought junkie melodrama.
  25. There’s a certain amount of melodrama in the premiere (which is all that was previewed for critics), but the beginning fits a fair amount of nuance into a package that could have been a soapbox. Ireland in particular gives Christine fine shading, and the way that race plays into the story--and into Adam’s career ambitions--feels more natural than engineered.
  26. So far it works.... Asylum feels like a more focused, if equally frenetic, screamfest. It's also gorgeously realized.
  27. It now has a compelling subject, the emergence, through modem clicks and whistles, of the wired Internet era we live in. Like many a good period piece, it’s really our own origin story.
  28. As a documentary, Vito is fairly straightforward, but by finding a thread connecting Russo's life, his passions and his times, it manages to be something more.
  29. Even the best version of The Leftovers, if it proves a complete creative success, will not be a show for everyone. Yet it believes fervently, messily, heartbreakingly, that even two percent of everyone means more than you can imagine.

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