Time's Scores

For 474 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 38% higher than the average critic
  • 9% same as the average critic
  • 53% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 1.6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 Homeland: Season 1
Lowest review score: 0 The Playboy Club: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 282
  2. Negative: 0 out of 282
282 tv reviews
  1. An imaginative departure from the sea of indistinguishable sitcoms on the networks this fall.
  2. The show's grungy ambience and gleeful puncturing of TV ideals of happy domesticity have made it the most daring new sitcom of the fall.
  3. The season's best new sitcom. ... Reiser, a former stand-up comic, has knife-edge timing and a full repertoire of nervous tics, and Hunt manages to be both charming and exasperating at the same time.
  4. The show becomes more engrossing as is spins out from her story, fleshing out the inmates, their backstories, and their alliances. You may come for the culture-clash cringe-comedy; it’s the real human stories that will have you captivated.
  5. What’s most compelling about The Bridge is that it emphasizes not the psychology or forensics of the case but its context.
  6. Brooklyn Nine-Nine is easily the fall’s strongest comedy pilot, clever, appealing, feeling thought-through and lived in after only a half-hour.
  7. The charming pilot swerves quickly from the expected Bravo-reality-show-catfight scenario and becomes something more complicated and rewarding: a good-hearted comedy about an extended family (including Pete’s two ex-wives) figuring out how to make itself work on the fly.
  8. In the three episodes sent to critics in advance, Community sounds like itself again.
  9. Refreshingly, Looking doesn’t contort itself to create a character to represent every different aspect of “the gay experience.”
  10. While Broad City is not heartwarming comedy, there’s an undertone of need and connection between them that helps their friendship make sense: Ilana needs Abbi’s dependability, Abbi needs Ilana to give her a kick into gear. Together, they give the early episodes an off-kilter sense of fun that recommends sticking around for more. Broad City is not the next Louie yet, nor should it try to be, but it’s a promising version of itself.
  11. It offers a quiet, empathetic picture from the perspective of Romney and his family of what it’s like for a human being to experience the glare of a modern media campaign and to offer himself up for rejection, twice.
  12. In each one [hour] that we do see, there’s a sense of urgency in the face of change, of characters figuring they have maybe one more chance to get themselves where they want to be.
  13. As the series itself develops (it was somewhere in episode 3 that I really got on board), all these broad-strokes characters add together into a more complex whole.
  14. The first newscast did feel simultaneously long and breathless, maybe because there was little to vary it or break up the topic segments.... But it was a funny, confident start.
  15. It’s a first draft told by a first responder, with no time for niceties. But it is deepened and rounded out by some remarkable supporting performances, especially a fantastic Jim Parsons as Tommy, a warmhearted activist volunteer.
  16. Even the best version of The Leftovers, if it proves a complete creative success, will not be a show for everyone. Yet it believes fervently, messily, heartbreakingly, that even two percent of everyone means more than you can imagine.
  17. There’s a certain amount of melodrama in the premiere (which is all that was previewed for critics), but the beginning fits a fair amount of nuance into a package that could have been a soapbox. Ireland in particular gives Christine fine shading, and the way that race plays into the story--and into Adam’s career ambitions--feels more natural than engineered.
  18. There are signs that the premise may not sustain for long (the title, after all, gives it only a week), but it still shows that a good pratfall is the universal language.
  19. The new episodes quickly jump back in, with higher stakes and sharper jokes, and creator Josh Schwartz hasn't let the strike stop him from developing Chuck's character.
  20. Its stripped-from-the-tabloids approach is nothing new, but it's well done, and a little familiarity won't hurt the show's chances.
  21. Like a successful patient, the show has learned and grown, becoming more reliably compelling.
  22. Lie to Me's pilot is brisk anthropological fun.
  23. It's a promising comedy about a shallow man trying to make his life right, one bad deed at a time.
  24. If The Good Wife can maintain the first episode's tone, it will keep an audience even after political sex scandals fade from the news.
  25. What Prison Break lacks in plausibility--basically, everything--it makes up for in plotting, pacing and panache.
  26. None of these [new sci-fi] series matches Lost's mix of character, wit and story, but the grim Invasion at least has the story part down, and keeps the horror at a nicely restrained simmer
  27. Imperfect but chilling.... In the end, Sleeper Cell is every bit as nailbiting as 24, with one crucial difference: neither the terrorists nor the Feds are supergeniuses.
  28. It's all delightfully phony, but will win your faith on charm and panache.
  29. Good-hearted, eccentric and wry, Ride goes nowhere fast, but it has a fine time getting there.
  30. The show's conversational improv rhythms and realistic, documentary style make Sons and Daughters worth adopting.

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