Time's Scores

For 605 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 39% higher than the average critic
  • 8% same as the average critic
  • 53% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 1.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 Crime Story: Season 1
Lowest review score: 0 The Playboy Club: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 369
  2. Negative: 0 out of 369
369 tv reviews
  1. The nostalgic tone of Stranger Things succeeds less from discrete moment to moment than as an overall ambience; in synthy music, vivid shooting style, and deeply earnest performances, the show is committed to selling you a sort of story that doesn’t exist in mainstream pop culture anymore.
  2. I will say that the show really has a handle now on Leslie Knope (Amy Poehler), who comes across as an overzealous but sympathetic bureaucrat, not a ninny. That it is doing an excellent job of finding things for its supporting characters to do, suggesting it may someday have the bench strength of a show like "The Office. "
  3. At least in the first four hours... the show reminds us of the intense thrills it can provide even without threatening to blow up the entire planet.
  4. House of Cards isn't wholly original. But it is supremely confident.
  5. The opposition is less well-drawn.... But the plot advances, slowly and inexorably as the gears of bureaucracy, and Hero‘s emotional power builds as it focuses on the townhouses’ new residents and the initiative’s power to change their lives.
  6. As the series itself develops (it was somewhere in episode 3 that I really got on board), all these broad-strokes characters add together into a more complex whole.
  7. It de-emphasizes what I thought was worst about the original–the shooting-fish-in-an-aquarium reality-TV satire–and builds on what was best: Lisa Kudrow’s microcalibrated performance, and its cringe-making yet sympathetic depiction of an actress, now around 50, trying to make it in an industry that stamps a sell-by date on women.
  8. The result is the most promising show in years for Starz, which since Party Down’s glory days has focused on blood-heavy spectacles like Spartacus and Black Sails or morose antihero dramas like Boss and Magic City.
  9. The only part of the otherwise sophisticated Confirmation that rings false is its closing chyron, which indicates that Hill's case emboldened victims of harassment to speak out and factored into 1992's congressional "year of the woman," in which female candidates won more seats than ever before.
  10. Bemused Hurt and quiet, searching Morton do terrifically with the material, which shares with its theme song, David Bowie's "Blackstar," a sense of remove and oddity.
  11. Kids are drawn by the show's loopy slapstick, grownups by its dry (so to speak) wit.
  12. An improbable, heart-pounding and-tugging mix of fantastical '60s spy chic and emotionally realistic drama ... Ridiculous, over the top but unashamed, it manages to thrill and win our hearts.
  13. While The Roosevelts is, yes, long and at points fast-forwardable, in its best moments it gives human breath to a well-covered period of history, all in service of an idea: showing the ways that, through these generation, America matured and changed.
  14. The first episode is, maybe to grab the young-guy audience, heavier on the sexplay and lighter on the laughs. But two or three episodes in, the characters and dynamics come together, and the show really begins to kill. Literally and figuratively, but mostly figuratively.
  15. Like the dystopian British anthology Black Mirror, Humans is a sci-fi premise smartly reimagined for our own age of tech outsourcing.
  16. With sharp, observational wit, the show takes us through the familiar process of getting to know someone.
  17. A low-key but moving documentary about these two low-key people and their moving struggle.
  18. Younger sells it through Foster’s agile charm and its refusal to make any of its characters into punching bags. (TV Land sent out the full season for review; I’ve seen five episodes.) Like its protagonist, the ideas behind Younger have been around the block a few times. But it doesn’t show its age at all.
  19. Refreshingly, Looking doesn’t contort itself to create a character to represent every different aspect of “the gay experience.”
  20. The funniest new sitcom of the spring ... What makes Universe funny and not just wacky is that it uses the qualities that endeared viewers to Richter's Late Night persona--the affable, moon-faced cynic--making the character the kind of sweet but snarky dreamer you would want in the next cubicle.
  21. Shot intimately with handheld camera, it's a moving but unsentimental celebration of community, of pulling together not just because it's right but also because it's necessary.
  22. Like its characters themselves, Terriers has higher aims, but its appeal comes from being likeable and familiar. It balances its running storyline with individual cases, carried largely by Logue and Raymond-James' charm.
  23. If Downton's staging and dialogue can be too on-the-nose, the characters are still drawn with great subtlety.
  24. [A] captivating, slow-burn emotional mystery.
  25. Luck too is far from perfect, but I found a lot to love in its rough edges.
  26. I hope it's not an old-man thing to say, and that you don't have to be an old man to appreciate it, but the truth that Men understands is that just getting through the day is drama enough. Here's looking forward to another year.
  27. The ambition on display is laudable; Leo Tolstoy’s novel is transformed into an entertainment product that moves with 21st century briskness.
  28. Beyond the cat-and-mouse international intrigue, which deepens after the pilot, The Americans has an absorbing personal story to tell--one as familiar yet unusual as its aliens-among-us protagonists.
  29. There's a sweet, good-hearted minuteness of observation to the show, which manages to work in middle-of-the-night wakings and diaper changes without going for obvious gags.
  30. Jones’ heroic commitment helps Angie Tribeca maintain its balance. She’s playing Mariska Hargitay on SVU, but in a world where the crimes are low stakes and easily tied to puns. It’s a performance that never breaks.

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