Tiny Mix Tapes' Scores

  • Music
For 2,693 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 42% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 56% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 4.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 68
Highest review score: 100 The Royal Society
Lowest review score: 0 Born to Die
Score distribution:
2693 music reviews
    • 44 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Their insides have been swapped: the dirty, heavy, colossal, dark-nastiness has been replaced with arena-rock aspirations and fresh-white, paper-thin production.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    So, largely unimaginative arrangements, flat delivery, a surfeit of vague ecological metaphors that wash like spray on the rocks (you can have that one for free, Mr. Hansen), and a lack of any sense of connection, of need, of reality.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    There is no sense of nostalgia here, only pure awkwardness and honest decadence that take the definition of 'kitsch' to unexpected artistic levels.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Many of This Unruly Mess I’ve Made’s flaws could’ve very well been forgotten, or at least temporarily swept under the rug, had the actual music been good.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Dry Land Is Not a Myth fails for two reasons that could have been easily corrected: (1) rock albums, especially rock albums purporting to be "psychotropic," should never be produced by artists whose primary working medium is the remix, and (2) Church's weird, pinched vocal delivery, which the editor remedies with a variety of fixes characteristic of overproduced music (see point 1).
    • 48 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Simply put: the lyrics are simply too vacuous and cliched, the production tinny and lacking any real thump, and Scwhartz’ charm? Nowhere to be found.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Katy B’s stultifying lyrics, paired with an EMI-sponsored coterie of established DJs, producers, and vocalists, surgically selected as if delegates of their respective niches, evince only the sound of the culture industry at work.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Its complete lack of anything unique just reeks of someone in the background, someone with a suit and a cigar, shaking hands with these fellows and telling them they’re “gonna blow up.”
    • 57 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Raditude is not a great album or even an interesting one.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    If there is a compliment to be paid to Hurley, it is that the band refrains from delving into the sort of WTF territory they've explored of late.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    Booze and Reynolds maintain a consistent level of awfulness throughout, but really bring their A-game to songs like the bludgeoningly-repetitive 'Sparkly Sweater,.'
    • 77 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    No, at best, The King Is Dead is a patchwork of genre exercises, giving listeners little more than a chance to play "spot the influence." But even then it fails, for it taps only a very shallow stream of tradition, focusing on a series of folk facsimiles from the 70s and 80s that never quite add up to the real thing.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    A slightly boring rock frontman adopts a pseudonym to make a solo album, and it sounds like his main band, recorded in a just-passable studio.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    Ultimately, Nas’ decision to sacrifice lyrical and aesthetic sensibility for controversy, hype, and pop-appeal exposes the commodification and hollowness of his artistic voice and vision.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    Señor Smoke suffers from nothing more then a total lack of discernable hooks to balance out the glaringly juvenile lyrics, cheese-filled synthesizers, and schlock-rock guitar stylings.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    The more you listen, the worse it gets.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    The majority of tunes on offer here do very little to build on the ideas and panache exposed on Soft Control.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    While this is drastically experimental by their standards, there is nothing here you haven't heard done infinitely better many times before.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    There's nothing inherently wrong about writing songs about enjoying booze and drugs, but this isn't something I'd put on under the influence of either. Just imagine what it sounds like sober.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    The other 14 contributions barely stand apart from one another, a rushed bile of the same sounds being used over and over again by unidentifiable producers, with only Bonobo delivering a track whose atmosphere extends beyond that of gimmicky tie-in music territory.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    It's pretty much all the same synth leads, bang-bang beats, and tired rhymes as every other Aftermath related project since The Eminem Show, which wasn't that great either.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    Bibio aims to express an exquisitely blurry mind-state; instead, his lack of focus conjures only a musty shadow of the varied, sportive electro-pop album he strains to create.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    Despite what they’d like us to think, The Red Album sounds like every one of Weezer’s misfires since "The Green Album": a few songs that work and a whole slew that flounder completely.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    Lantern comes off like Birchard wallowing in an uncharacteristic and blissful tedium.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    Destiny Fulfilled starts off pitifully and only gets worse.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    Wilson continues to rehash southern California culture with increasingly less perspective, further eschewing the untamed adolescent aesthetic by including stuffy musical theater elements and a top-down point-of-view that’s more clumsy analysis than sincere memoir.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    They play a very recognizable breed of avant-rock or indie-rock and are doing something that has been done over and over again in New York City.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    It's hard to paint this as anything other than what it is: a professional-sounding album of radio-friendly pop. It's as bad as that sounds.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    Even by Cornell's extremely shallow standards, this is unbelievably lazy production. [Joint review of both discs.]
    • 68 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    We’re given a de trop of horrid synthesizers, only to be outdone by worse choruses and banal refrains.