Tiny Mix Tapes' Scores

  • Music
For 2,709 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 42% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 56% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 4.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 68
Highest review score: 100 Almost Killed Me
Lowest review score: 0 Born This Way
Score distribution:
2709 music reviews
    • 85 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    The songs here tend to go nowhere for a quiet couple of minutes before bursting randomly into tightly composed melodrama, which could be mistaken for actually going somewhere.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    So, largely unimaginative arrangements, flat delivery, a surfeit of vague ecological metaphors that wash like spray on the rocks (you can have that one for free, Mr. Hansen), and a lack of any sense of connection, of need, of reality.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    There’s no sense of cohesion or flow between any of these songs, partially due to a clear lack of thought devoted to these conceits, but mostly because every M. Ward- and Conor Oberst-penned song sounds the same lately.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 10 Critic Score
    The only crime Lazaretto commits that wasn’t already covered by his misogynistic solo debut, Blunderbuss, is being really boring.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    In the end, Ribot’s considerable talents are sadly lost among 12 disjointed tracks that range from out-of-place cacophony to irritating cliché.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Schmilco is missing the same spark that drove Schmilsson. Where Nilsson was relentless in pursuit of something other than settling down, Tweedy has gone the other way.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Frustrated fanboy headscratching aside, the point is simple: All Day is a misstep of the worst kind, wherein Gillis' craft devolves from transformative to parasitic.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    It's hard to paint this as anything other than what it is: a professional-sounding album of radio-friendly pop. It's as bad as that sounds.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Sun
    Its songs are mostly amalgams of tired pop music tropes/techniques and trite realizations
    • 78 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    With two exceptions (Desiigner and, uh, Damon Albarn), the [guest artists] completely fail to elevate the tracks in any way, an unfortunate consequence of needing to feature Charli XCX on your album because she’s good and popular as hell rather than because you and Charli XCX have made any particularly interesting music together.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    No, at best, The King Is Dead is a patchwork of genre exercises, giving listeners little more than a chance to play "spot the influence." But even then it fails, for it taps only a very shallow stream of tradition, focusing on a series of folk facsimiles from the 70s and 80s that never quite add up to the real thing.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Food is another sad testament to how the squares have won and how we’re all likely to capitulate at one point or another to the dictates of the majority.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    More than one track goes on about how love will eventually get us to heaven and such, and the sickly, sugary sweetness of it all just leaves a bad taste in your mouth.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    Bibio aims to express an exquisitely blurry mind-state; instead, his lack of focus conjures only a musty shadow of the varied, sportive electro-pop album he strains to create.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    If The Raconteurs were any other group (that is, if The Raconteurs didn't have Jack White), the press/Blogosphere would slam it.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Menos el Oso takes the act of melodizing the banal to dizzyingly silly new heights.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    What was once shambling and humble and fun has turned into another anonymous, swaggering, guitar-driven indie rock act.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Every aspect of the album sounds like the full-length equivalent of a Spotify Chill Out playlist: flat, disposable, inoffensive (though “technically-sound”) 2010s muzak.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    The most egregious offender is Planet of Ice's last song, 'Lotus,' which clocks in at close to nine minutes, thanks to clumsy feedback inserted somewhat inappropriately between the beginning and end of what must have started out as a fairly straightforward rock song.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    While this is drastically experimental by their standards, there is nothing here you haven't heard done infinitely better many times before.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    When it’s watered down by this much sneakerhead aestheticism, it becomes hard to even hear the culture-shaking subversion that lurked in the sounds of Machinedrum’s influences.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Sometimes Avi Buffalo’s entrance into the gauntlet of the undisguised voice leads to a pretty song or two, maybe a moment of blissful pop; but more often than not, the songs whimper without much intelligible emotion.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Off to Business--released eponymously by Guided By Voices, Inc.--is the ultimate product of this trend: an album full of ebullient mid-tempo rockers, ebullient pretty guitar parts, and ebullient power drum fills.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    It sounds like a cross between Off the Wall-era Michael Jackson without the soul, the Banana Splits, the Grease soundtrack and shitty disco records.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Where The Excitement of Maybe shines--like a harvest moon--is in production, composition, and musicianship, but these alone aren't enough to sustain the distinctive voice Cervenka has spoken in so boldly, particularly when they're employed in the service of pastiche.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    It’s “Lost Boys and Girls Club,” “Cult of Love,” and “Trouble Is My Name” (“Trouble is my name/ Is it your name too?”), endless clichés in songwriting, narrative, subject, and sound.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    A change in demeanor accompanies this change in style, however, and it's a turn for the worse: Phoenix now gesture at being a Serious Group with Something to Say.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Colors dispels a greater notion of contemporary selfhood with its sheer tastelessness. It holds status as the most truly perplexing move from the artist to date. Unfortunately, the result of that move is borderline unlistenable.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    Ultimately, Nas’ decision to sacrifice lyrical and aesthetic sensibility for controversy, hype, and pop-appeal exposes the commodification and hollowness of his artistic voice and vision.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Lily’s nonchalant declarations of self-esteem leave me cold. And as soon as she traded generically upbeat ska/reggae samples for a bunch of ho-hum electropop beats, she became indistinguishable from her imitators.