TV Guide's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 5,170 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 48% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 49% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 59
Highest review score: 100 Pride & Prejudice
Lowest review score: 0 Strange Wilderness
Score distribution:
5,170 movie reviews
    • 72 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    One of the most perceptive movies about the gentrification of Los Angeles.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Powerful, haunting, and at times very moving, The Last Temptation of Christ presents its account of the events and conflicts of Christ's life with a depth of dramatized feeling and motivation that renders them freshly compelling.
    • 97 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    The film is bold stroke that hopes to push Romanian society forward by staring into the dismal failures of its recent past.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    In the end, Haar's powerful and terribly sad film speaks volumes, not just about life in contemporary Israel, but in the U.S. as well.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    Of the long list of couples who have loved neither wisely nor particularly well, few have such power to disturb as Burton Pugach and the love of his life, Linda Riss.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    German filmmaker Malte Ludin's gripping documentary about the father he barely knew is both an extraordinary exercise in family history and an example of what Germans call Vergangenheitsbewaeltigung: "facing the past," particularly the years of Hitler's Third Reich.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    This touching and beautifully photographed, if slightly overlong, tale of a boy and his horse follows the escapades of young Alec Ramsey (Reno), who is traveling across the ocean with his father.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    Bahrani's willingness to expose the shameful reality of third-world conditions in the Land of Plenty while telling a crackling good story marks him as a filmmaker as important as he is accessible.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    A marvelous, deceptively simple accomplishment shot on grainy 16mm film and featuring a cast of mostly nonprofessional actors delivering loosely written dialogue.
  1. But the real marvel is that beneath the ghoulish in-jokes and horror-geek allusions, there's a core of the same bittersweet truth that makes the best fairy tales resonate from one generation to the next.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    Once again, Field has crafted and grown-up movie that grabs you by the throat, drags you in and doesn't let you go until the very bitter end.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    Basilio narrates his tale with such wit and wisdom that one comes away from the film wondering how much youthful potential is slowly being choked to death deep within the bowels of the earth.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Repulsion has often been compared to "Psycho," but Polanski's film, rather than presenting a portrait of a psychotic killer from outside, pulls the audience into the crazed individual's mind. (Review of Original Release)
    • 93 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    A remarkably revealing documentary.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Satisfies the heart and engages the mind.
    • 100 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Captures the sleazy allure of Manhattan like no other film.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Sure-footed thriller, beautifully photographed, with Ford's best performance thus far.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Not a frame is wasted in this taut, superbly directed, masterfully acted film, the first so-called "adult Western." (Review of Original Release)
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    A tense and tightly plotted fictional thriller is based on real tactics used by the Stasi -- East Germany's secret police force -- to spy on and interrogate their own citizens.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    On the list of WWII stories criminally ignored by six decades of combat movies in the past 60 years, the heroics of French colonial soldiers ranks pretty high. But Rachid Bouchareb's powerful drama -- which won the 2006 Cannes Film Festival's best-actors award for its superb ensemble cast and was nominated for a best foreign-language-film Oscar, went a long way toward rectifying the situation, both on screen and in real life.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The film is a model of barely controlled hysteria in which the absurdity of hypermasculine Cold War posturing becomes devastatingly funny--and at the same time nightmarishly frightening in its accuracy.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Chilling Fosse vision of Weimar Berlin, stylishly directed and choreographed, featuring a show-stopping musical performance by Minnelli, Grey's unforgettable emcee and thoughtful acting from Michael York.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    Of all the feature films and documentaries to emerge since 9/11, few have been as bold, perceptive or as downright chilling as this thriller.
  2. Stands separate from the rest, in a pantheon, a true cinematic masterwork of sight, sound, intelligence, and most importantly--passion.
  3. Kramer vs. Kramer is, essentially, a television movie that was raised into the feature category by the excellence of the execution.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    Zoo
    Bold and unforgettable meditation on a truly bizarre incident that pokes at the very heart of one of our culture's biggest taboos.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    Against all odds, you'll leave this remarkable film caring quite a bit for the old coot -- surely a sign of a very good documentary.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    At the heart of this picturesque fable is a truism so shopworn it can barely stand repeating: It's better to give than to receive.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The one and only; an unqualified masterpiece and milestone.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    There are moments of such breathtaking grace and artistry that you'd be forgiven for thinking you're watching the most beautiful movie ever made.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    Warmly funny and very moving.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    All behave in ways that may at first seem incomprehensible, but through Moncrieff's expert storytelling, each woman is finally rendered merely human.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Diner is an often hilarious, frequently touching film.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Director Malick endows this simple, timeless story with the enormous scope and resonance of myth through a clear vision unclouded by sentimentality and by a deft juxtaposition of image, music, and character.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    In the end, Bill emerges as someone truly unique and someone who we feel privileged to know.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    Tragically, the title of James Longley's beautifully shot 90-minute documentary refers to not only the state in which he found the Iraq during the two years he spent there shooting over 300 hours of footage, but the structure the violent factionalism that divides Iraqi Sunnis, Shiites and Kurds imposes on his film.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Delicatessen is an ingeniously funny film with a surprisingly sweet romance at its center.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    In the end, it's best to make peace with the film's essential and deliberate inscrutability -- something Lynch fans have learned to do since Twin Peaks -- and to simply marvel at Dern's astonishing performance, which few actresses are likely to top anytime soon.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Sergio Leone's masterpiece. In Once Upon a Time in the West, Leone pulls together all the themes, characterizations, visuals, humor, and musical experiments of the three "Dollars" films and comes up with a true epic western. It is a stunning, operatic film of breadth, detail, and stature that deserves to be considered among the greatest westerns ever made. (Review of Original Release)
    • 71 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    Caton-Jones' refusal to pull back on showing exactly what happened to the 800,000 Rwandans who were murdered that spring means that strong stomachs and even stronger nerves are required, but the film demands to be seen by anyone attempting to grasp how -- and just how quickly -- genocide can occur.
    • 100 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The Godfather is a generational saga; it's also an action film; but above all, it catches the imagination of audiences because it suggests that the career of a gangster is not so very different from the career of a businessman or a politician.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    No other motion picture about Hollywood comes near Billy Wilder's searing, uncompromising and utterly fascinating portrait of the film community.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    A slow-paced but hypnotically absorbing movie, it's buoyed by Jarmusch's trademark off-key humor and embellished throughout by an electrifying instrumental score, courtesy of Neil Young.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Up
    You get the feeling that, had Pixar been in business 25 years ago, Steven Spielberg might have made this movie for them as a follow-up to "Raiders of the Lost Ark."
  4. A thrilling return to form.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    What makes husband-and-wife directing team Jonathan Dayton and Valerie Faris' hilarious debut such a great family film isn't that it's suitable for the whole family (it's not), but that it speaks a simple truth about what it means to be part of one.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    One of the most harrowing, viscerally upsetting films ever made.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    Released simultaneously in the U.S. with Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck's Oscar-nominated fictional thriller "The Lives of Others," this chilling 82-minute documentary about three souls destroyed by the Stasi, the notorious secret police of East Germany, puts a cold, factual gloss on what might otherwise be taken for fiction.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Straightforward, energetic, updated Bard. 28-year-old star-director-adapter Kenneth Branagh's spellbinding version of Shakespeare's Henry isn't superior to Olivier's 1944 version - it's different, and complementary to it.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    Few of China's Sixth Generation filmmakers have turned to their country's explosive economic growth and its attendant upheavals with so sharp an eye and so heavy a heart as Jia Zhang-ke.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    The final confrontation is a slow-motion, De Palma-esque massacre in a hotel lobby that begins and ends in the amount of time it takes for a high-flying can of Red Bull to hit the floor. Breathtaking.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    A beautiful, at times poetic exercise in excess from Brian De Palma.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    Never an easy one to impress, Reed is clearly in awe of Antony's ethereal voice, and it must now stand as the definitive version of a 40 year old song.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Mike Nichols, in his first venture into movies since "The Fortune," elicited superlative performances from the actors, particularly Streep and stage veteran Sudi Bond.
  5. Crammed with outrageous turns of fortune and quicksilver shifts in tone, Almodovar's film is held together by performances so subtle and complex it's hard to single out only one as exceptional. But Cruz is astonishing.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    The real emotional impact of the film lies in the candid interviews with Crowhurst's wife, Clare, and his son, Simon, both of whom are clearly still haunted by Crowhurst and his fateful voyage.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Like "Juno" or "Little Miss Sunshine," Away We Go is a small film, the kind of gem that's easy to crush with hype or overpraise. But, the fact is that few movies deal with feelings this profound with as much restraint as Mendes and his crew display here.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    Zieger's thoroughly researched film is a vital reminder that beginning in the mid-'60s, a few conscience-stricken military individuals -- including dermatologist Dr. Howard Levy, sickened by cynical attempts to win Vietnamese "hearts and minds" through medical treatment, and Navy nurse Susan Schnall, who wore her uniform to a civilian antiwar demonstration -- actively and openly voiced peace sentiments.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Hoffman is uncharacteristically charming in a demanding role; the supporting cast is uniformly excellent, particularly Chief Dan George as a befuddled patriarch who takes the supernatural as a matter of course.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    Beautifully acted, structurally sophisticated heart-tugger.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Director Weir and cinematographer Russell Boyd's re-creation of the invasion and battle action is stunning, but what makes Gallipoli such an affecting film is its intimate presentation of the friendship between Archy and Frank (wonderfully essayed by Lee and Gibson).
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    A wonderfully brooding, suspenseful revisitation of the land of film noir, Chinatown is not only one of the greatest detective films, but one of the most perfectly constructed of all films.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    Cheung gives a revelatory performance.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    The title, by the way, is age-old slang for a soldier's complete combat gear, which for the U.S. soldiers in Iraq -- both real and otherwise -- weighs over 50 pounds.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    Powerful crime drama does more than just expose the criminal underbelly of South African township life.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    A gorgeous, fluid, wonderfully exhilarating movie.
  6. But overall, Jackson goes for the magic by sidestepping every error of judgment and failure of imagination that brought the ponderous 1976 remake thudding to Earth before Kong ever did. He delivers three solid hours of breathless, enchanting entertainment.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    If one masterpiece were to emerge from the recent glut of generally good quality Japanese horror movie, this chilling apocalyptic ghost story from Kyroshi Kurosawa is it.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    It's simply one of the most beautiful films he's (Hou Hsiao Hsien) made to date.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The craftsmanship, acting, and history lesson all make it among the most satisfying films of Ron Howard's career.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    Amalric is extraordinary, creating a character literally without moving a muscle.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    Jordan and McCabe's real triumph here, however, is the tenderness with which they imbues "Kitten," and the astonishing grace with which the extraordinary Murphy pulls it off.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    Shakespeare himself couldn't have written better or more complex characters, and far from strange, by the end of this extraordinary film you couldn't imagine Shakespeare performed anywhere else.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    Sicilian-born filmmaker Emanuele Crialese takes a huge leap forward from his pretty but simplistic "Respiro" with this highly original, startlingly beautiful and emotionally resonant film.
  7. Director Carl Franklin, who also adapted the screenplay from Walter Mosley's prize-winning novel, isn't particularly concerned with the machinations of mystery plots. Nor is he seduced by the temptations of noir visual style (although Tak Fujimoto's camera work is plenty stylish).
  8. The appealing Knightley goes in a promising young actress and comes out a star, but the faultless cast of veterans and fresh-faced newcomers imbues every character with flawed and immensely appealing humanity.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    It's full of humor, pathos and a deep humanism that comes as a warm blast in this age of lifeless, cinematic junk.
    • 97 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Only a spirited and extravagant production could do justice to the Robin Hood legend; this film is more than equal to the task. Korngold's score won a well-deserved Oscar, as did the editing and art direction.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Gus Van Sant's direction here is supremely confident, fusing witty camerawork, neat editing, and a jazz-oriented score to make Drugstore Cowboy an exhilaratingly bumpy ride.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    With his carefully controlled pacing and superb use of sound, Sarkies draws the viewer deep into the experience of a town caught completely off-guard by a kind of violence they could never have expected, and won't soon forget.
  9. It concludes Park's trilogy on a dual note of circular tragedy and fragile hope, while working equally well as an introduction to his universe of retribution and repentance or as a stand-alone thriller with a darkly feminist twist.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    Burtynsky's keen sense of color, pattern and composition are obvious from his work, but equally acute are his thoughts on how he as an artist as well as an inhabitant of the planet fits into the larger scheme of things.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Deliriously expressionistic visually and aurally.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Visually stunning adventure. (Review of Original Release)
  10. Fincher gets it all right, and Donovan's hippie-dippy "Hurdy Gurdy Man," which bookends the story, has never sounded so hauntingly menacing.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    n a remarkable directorial effort, Eastwood shows a great flair for atmosphere and composition and presents a nuanced, complex, humane portrait of Parker's talents, obstacles, virtues and failings. Whitaker gives a towering performance as the tortured musical genius, and Venora is equally impressive as the independent, compassionate Chan.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    One of Coppola's very best.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    Dunn's elegant, full-length debut presents a frightening and powerful argument against the kind of reckless, profit-driven land development that not only threatens natural resources, but life itself.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    Even Wong's detractors, who consider him more stylist than auteur, will have a tough time dismissing the extraordinary emotional depth he achieves here.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    One of the greatest films of all time and one of the handful of masterpieces to emerge from the Italian neo-realist period, Umberto D is as cerebral as it is emotional, as bleak as it is warm.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Indeed, all of the performers in the film truly shine, and all of them can probably thank Sam Mendes for creating an ideal environment.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    This exceptional film features some of the most beautiful cinematography ever seen on film, in service of some of the most horrible images imaginable.
  11. Despite the absence of dialogue -- the mice squeak and the oak creatures caw like ravens -- Cegavske imbues her scrappy little creatures with disturbingly complex personalities. And if the tale's moral is less than clear, its haunting images speak directly to some dark, preverbal corner of the heart.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The cast is wonderful--especially McGavin, Billingsley and Petrella--the laughs are nonstop if rarely subtle, and the whole thing deserves to become a Christmastime classic.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Shattering social and sexual conventions, Last Tango in Paris stands as one of Bernardo Bertolucci's finer achievements.
  12. Serenely stunning.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Deft comedy set in a neurotic town. People may argue about the relative merits of Annie Hall vis-a-vis Manhattan, which is a better and more fully realized film. By this time Allen had forsworn the glib one-liner and spent more time developing well-rounded characters.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Brilliantly conceived, imaginatively structured, superbly written, stylishly composed and photographed, and very often wryly funny, Killer of Sheep lives up to its official designation as a national treasure.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    Hadzihalilovic succeeds brilliantly at crafting a meaningful enigma that somehow grasps the essence of adolescence, but only grows more mysterious with each revelation.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    So it should come as no surprise that what Maddin eventually produced is a film about HIS Winnipeg, a psychological terrain that's no more -- nor less -- "real" than William Carlos William's Paterson or Marcel Proust's Combray.

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