TV Guide's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 5,170 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 48% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 49% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 1.9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 59
Lowest review score: 0 Strange Wilderness
Score distribution:
5,170 movie reviews
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Clever camera setups, Altman's patented overlapping dialogue, wonderful sight gags and situations, and universally fine ensemble performances combine to make this one the most enjoyable war-themed films ever.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    After reminding us that the AIDS crisis in the West is far from over in "The Event," Fitzgerald widened his scope with this much-needed perspective on the global dimensions the disease has achieved. Despite the importance and seriousness of the subject, there's plenty of Fitzgerald's brand of sly humor on hand, particularly in the scenes involving the Quebecoise porn industry.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    The result is a beguiling and often poignant pageant of outsider musicians, but the broken heart of this extraordinary film comes directly from Zobel's own personal experience.
    • 100 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    This great film, made with uncompromising honesty and devastating reality, is, according to Jean-Luc Godard, "the world in an hour and a half."
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    As a remake, The Fly transcends the original, taking it in new directions and exploring its underutilized potential.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    Lee has perfectly captured the details, textures, sights and sounds of a China caught between East and West, occupied by an ancient enemy and quaking on the eve of an earth-shaking revolution.
  1. Cornish's raw, nuanced performance and Shortland's sympathetic but unsentimental portrayal of Heidi's fumbling steps toward maturity are underscored by Sydney-based band Decoder Ring's catchy, angst-ridden score.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    This is a powerful, important and, in the end, profoundly poignant movie dedicated to the lives of men and women who fight wars and shoulder the burden of becoming "heroes" to help the rest of us make sense of what remains incomprehensible.
  2. Del Toro's film ranks with the best examinations of children's inner lives, but be warned: Its haunting insights are best left to adults.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    A small comic masterpiece that dares to deal with that of which many Sicilians dare not speak: the Mafia.
  3. The Graduate is a flawlessly acted and produced film. [Review of re-release]
  4. By turns awe-inspiring and deeply human.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Thankfully, Coraline is appropriately dark, and like its inspiration, is only a children's movie by the thinnest of margins.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Cinematographer Willis superbly captures the turn-of-the-century period, applying a seriographic tint to flashback scenes for a softer, richer look than the sharp image of the ongoing contemporary story.
    • 100 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    One of Bertolucci's best films, The Conformist makes a provocative connection between repressed sexual desires and fascist politics. It's an intriguing, elegantly photographed study of the twisted Italian character of the 1930s. (Review of Original Release)
    • 100 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    David Lean's splendid biography of the enigmatic T.E. Lawrence paints a complex portrait of the desert-loving Englishman who united Arab tribes in battle against the Ottoman Turks during WWI.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    This grand and powerful biography begins in 1908 when, at the age of three, Pu Yi was named emperor of China and follows him through a tumultuous life inextricably intertwined with the history of modern-day China, one that that ended with the once-coddled emperor working quietly as a gardener at Peking's Botanical Gardens.
  5. That Ledger stands out in such a powerhouse ensemble is a tribute to his radically unhinged interpretation of a familiar character: The lank hair tinged seaweed green, the darting tongue and faint lisp that call constant attention to the ghastly rictus of his mouth, the nightmarishly smudged make up… taken together, they make previous Jokers feel like, well, jokes.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    By common consensus, Stop Making Sense is the best concert film ever made.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    A finely observed film but insufficiently developed as a satire of middle America. [Review of re-release]
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    It can hardly be called a children's film, but a masterpiece of feature-film animation for all ages.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    First-time feature director Sanaa Hamri's virtually perfect romantic comedy is a marvelous mix of brains and heart that confronts serious questions about race and dating with sensitivity, humor and enormous sex appeal.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Bright cunningly translates the story of Little Red Riding Hood into the trashy vernacular of tabloid TV and reality-based cop shows.
  6. Refreshing, innovative and immensely funny.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    But it is Angela Lansbury's incestuous, power-mad mother who makes your blood run cold. This was the peak of the first part of her career, which depended upon these hardbitten kind of characters. Forget Hitchcock--here's the monster mother of all time.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    A draining experience from beginning to end, relentless in its portrayal of inhumanity.
    • 100 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The results are quite frightening and far superior to the lengthy gloom and doom that fill many earlier Bergman films. A magical movie, Fanny and Alexander is likely to be the achievement for which Bergman will be most remembered. (Review of Original Release)
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    Thom Andersen's idiosyncratic, three-hour masterpiece is both a dazzling work of film criticism and a fascinating piece of urban anthropology.
    • 100 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    This is a gorgeous, fascinating account of the interplay between the personal and the social, directed with the kind of insight that only an aristocrat turned Marxist like Visconti could afford. (Review of Original Release)
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Hopkins plays the cannibalistic doctor with a quiet, controlled erudition, lacing his performance with moments of black humor. His Lecter is a sort of satanic Sherlock Holmes whose spasms of violence are all the more terrifying because they erupt from beneath such an intelligent and refined mask.

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