TV Guide's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 5,168 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 48% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 49% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 59
Highest review score: 100 Volver
Lowest review score: 0 Strange Wilderness
Score distribution:
5,168 movie reviews
  1. British documentarian Peter Bate frames a mix of archival materials and re-creations with a "trial" at which Leopold listens to testimony against him from within a wood-and-glass booth, like Nazi Adolf Eichmann at Nuremberg.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    This is the rare Holocaust documentary that ends on an optimistic note, and Comforty's film might even help reinforce one's faith in humankind.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    The result is flashy -- first-time directors Larry and Andy Wachowski never miss an opportunity to show us red, red drops of blood against brilliant white -- but pretty good fun, especially if the thought of Tilly in a succession of thigh-high bandage dresses makes you sweat.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Hilarious and stunningly frank, writer-director Todd Solondz's evocation of awkward adolescence is a bracing antidote to the counterfeit nostalgia of "The Wonder Years" or "My So-Called Life".
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    This might be the only documentary that will appeal to punks and Mormons alike.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    A thoughtful, unsparing look at a controversial subject: suicide bombing.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    A fascinating rumination on humanity, technology, entertainment, sex, and politics that is virtually incomprehensible on first viewing and needs to be seen several times before one can even begin to unlock its mysteries. (Review of Original Release)
    • 38 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    For a movie about all sorts of warm and gooey things -- faith, surrender to wonder, and the possibility of love in a hard, cold world -- it's got a bracingly astringent edge.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    Important, awareness-building documentary.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    A beautifully shot, wonderfully moving film.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    Cornillac is excellent as the emotionally immature Gilles, but this is Devos' show.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    There is, however, considerable humor to what might have been an exceedingly grim film, and most of it comes courtesy of Mona's slippery brother, Marwan (Ashraf Barhoum).
    • 60 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    Thanks largely to Tabatabai's superb performance, it's on this level that Maccarone's film is most affecting.
  2. Feels astonishingly fresh, filled with subtle performances and devastatingly understated images - Sautet's final shot of Davos alone in a Paris crowd is a killer.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    Directed with charming restraint by the acclaimed American producer Dan Ireland, the film is a quiet triumph for Dame Joan.
  3. Though the film's downbeat ending was softened for U.S. release, it's still a long way from happy.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    While Gyllenhaal is a competent actor, Ledger - surprisingly enough - is becoming a great one, and the levels of intensity they bring to their roles render this romantically star-crossed relationship emotionally lopsided.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    Rarely do movies portray the elderly with such admiration and respect.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    It's intriguing stuff, but Curtis overplays his hand when he underplays the existence of any real threat (Madrid? London? Amman?), proposes that Al Qaeda is a fiction and risks undermining the credibility of an otherwise compelling argument.
  4. The thorny heart of Steven Spielberg's sober, fact-based political thriller about Israeli retaliation for the murder of 11 Olympic athletes by Palestinian terrorists is the knowledge that vengeance is a self-perpetuating murder machine that drags successive generations into a mire of tit-for-tat bloodshed.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    Through what sounds like a project of unpromisingly limited scope, Lee manages to touch on a surprisingly wide range of subjects, from cultural identity, familial expectations, community responsibility and, above all, self-definition.
  5. Xiao's bittersweet film is superficially a swoony love letter to the cinema. But her valentine has a hidden sting, rooted in some hard truths about movie mania.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    On the surface, True Lies is an affectionate homage to James Bond movies, ratcheted up to meet the action/adventure expectations of today's audiences.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Unlike so many other recent youth-oriented independent efforts, it takes on difficult, even impossible, issues with genuinely astonishing results.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    Easily one of the most brutally realistic horror movies since the original "Texas Chain Saw Massacre" (1974).
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    The film is surprisingly satisfying and meaningful.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    Told mostly through haunting, often chilling visual fragments, this handsomely mounted and unusually gripping account amounts to an important exercise in biography: It faithfully restores Spielrein to her rightful place as a crucial contributor to the fields of child psychology and psychoanalysis.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    The result is a finely tuned suspense thriller, though executives who have recently laid off trained killers may experience some discomfort.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Though the facts have been manipulated in the interests of drama--Gerry and Giuseppe were never imprisoned together, etc.--this has been done in a brave and responsible way, shedding light on an important episode in recent history.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    Beautifully played by Valette and Zylberstein, and directed with amazing grace by Albou, this touching film offers a respectful, fascinating look at a community that's ignored as often as it's misunderstood.

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