TV Guide's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 5,170 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 48% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 49% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.3 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 59
Highest review score: 100 After Hours
Lowest review score: 0 Zombie! vs. Mardi Gras
Score distribution:
5,170 movie reviews
  1. Despite the absence of dialogue -- the mice squeak and the oak creatures caw like ravens -- Cegavske imbues her scrappy little creatures with disturbingly complex personalities. And if the tale's moral is less than clear, its haunting images speak directly to some dark, preverbal corner of the heart.
  2. Director Carl Franklin, who also adapted the screenplay from Walter Mosley's prize-winning novel, isn't particularly concerned with the machinations of mystery plots. Nor is he seduced by the temptations of noir visual style (although Tak Fujimoto's camera work is plenty stylish).
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    This is a powerful, important and, in the end, profoundly poignant movie dedicated to the lives of men and women who fight wars and shoulder the burden of becoming "heroes" to help the rest of us make sense of what remains incomprehensible.
  3. Crammed with outrageous turns of fortune and quicksilver shifts in tone, Almodovar's film is held together by performances so subtle and complex it's hard to single out only one as exceptional. But Cruz is astonishing.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    Tragically, the title of James Longley's beautifully shot 90-minute documentary refers to not only the state in which he found the Iraq during the two years he spent there shooting over 300 hours of footage, but the structure the violent factionalism that divides Iraqi Sunnis, Shiites and Kurds imposes on his film.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    After reminding us that the AIDS crisis in the West is far from over in "The Event," Fitzgerald widened his scope with this much-needed perspective on the global dimensions the disease has achieved. Despite the importance and seriousness of the subject, there's plenty of Fitzgerald's brand of sly humor on hand, particularly in the scenes involving the Quebecoise porn industry.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    A tense and tightly plotted fictional thriller is based on real tactics used by the Stasi -- East Germany's secret police force -- to spy on and interrogate their own citizens.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    On the list of WWII stories criminally ignored by six decades of combat movies in the past 60 years, the heroics of French colonial soldiers ranks pretty high. But Rachid Bouchareb's powerful drama -- which won the 2006 Cannes Film Festival's best-actors award for its superb ensemble cast and was nominated for a best foreign-language-film Oscar, went a long way toward rectifying the situation, both on screen and in real life.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    In the end, it's best to make peace with the film's essential and deliberate inscrutability -- something Lynch fans have learned to do since Twin Peaks -- and to simply marvel at Dern's astonishing performance, which few actresses are likely to top anytime soon.
  4. Del Toro's film ranks with the best examinations of children's inner lives, but be warned: Its haunting insights are best left to adults.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    All behave in ways that may at first seem incomprehensible, but through Moncrieff's expert storytelling, each woman is finally rendered merely human.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    A small comic masterpiece that dares to deal with that of which many Sicilians dare not speak: the Mafia.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    German filmmaker Malte Ludin's gripping documentary about the father he barely knew is both an extraordinary exercise in family history and an example of what Germans call Vergangenheitsbewaeltigung: "facing the past," particularly the years of Hitler's Third Reich.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    Released simultaneously in the U.S. with Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck's Oscar-nominated fictional thriller "The Lives of Others," this chilling 82-minute documentary about three souls destroyed by the Stasi, the notorious secret police of East Germany, puts a cold, factual gloss on what might otherwise be taken for fiction.
  5. Fincher gets it all right, and Donovan's hippie-dippy "Hurdy Gurdy Man," which bookends the story, has never sounded so hauntingly menacing.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Bright cunningly translates the story of Little Red Riding Hood into the trashy vernacular of tabloid TV and reality-based cop shows.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    Caton-Jones' refusal to pull back on showing exactly what happened to the 800,000 Rwandans who were murdered that spring means that strong stomachs and even stronger nerves are required, but the film demands to be seen by anyone attempting to grasp how -- and just how quickly -- genocide can occur.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    This grand and powerful biography begins in 1908 when, at the age of three, Pu Yi was named emperor of China and follows him through a tumultuous life inextricably intertwined with the history of modern-day China, one that that ended with the once-coddled emperor working quietly as a gardener at Peking's Botanical Gardens.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Brilliantly conceived, imaginatively structured, superbly written, stylishly composed and photographed, and very often wryly funny, Killer of Sheep lives up to its official designation as a national treasure.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    A remarkably revealing documentary.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    n a remarkable directorial effort, Eastwood shows a great flair for atmosphere and composition and presents a nuanced, complex, humane portrait of Parker's talents, obstacles, virtues and failings. Whitaker gives a towering performance as the tortured musical genius, and Venora is equally impressive as the independent, compassionate Chan.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    There is much to recommend in this film, and sheer energy pours off the screen in every frame.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    By common consensus, Stop Making Sense is the best concert film ever made.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    A gorgeous, fluid, wonderfully exhilarating movie.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Deliriously expressionistic visually and aurally.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    One of Coppola's very best.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Shattering social and sexual conventions, Last Tango in Paris stands as one of Bernardo Bertolucci's finer achievements.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Deft comedy set in a neurotic town. People may argue about the relative merits of Annie Hall vis-a-vis Manhattan, which is a better and more fully realized film. By this time Allen had forsworn the glib one-liner and spent more time developing well-rounded characters.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    As a remake, The Fly transcends the original, taking it in new directions and exploring its underutilized potential.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The film is flushed with bright light and cartoon hues, nicely accenting the fast-paced stew of incidents.

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