TV Guide Magazine's Scores

For 1,053 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 48% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 49% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.3 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 The Hollow Crown: Season 1
Lowest review score: 0 Liz & Dick
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 595
  2. Negative: 0 out of 595
595 tv reviews
  1. It lacks the star power (Hugh Grant, Emma Thompson, Kate Winslet) of Ang Lee's 1995 Oscar winner. But Austen's characters are so enduring and endearing in their virtues, vanities and passionate follies that they don't require movie stars to bring them to life.
  2. As unnerving as it is erotic, The Affair promises to be a show to remember.
  3. Almost the Truth (The Lawyer’s Cut) is a serious history of sublime nonsense, packaged with classic Python-esque irreverence.
  4. The irony is that while Elizabeth is continually told to suppress her individuality for the sake of the monarchy, the marvelous The Crown renders her more fully human than ever. [7 - 20 Nov 2016, p.12]
    • TV Guide Magazine
  5. A show and a heroine larger than life, twice as colorful and infinitely more adorable.
  6. This sleek, sexy, smartly cynical drama about selling everything from cigarettes to Nixon also nails the era's attitudes of casual prejudice and sexual manipulation.
  7. This show earns its laughter with sharp writing, brilliant casting and characters that hit very close to home while often striking a nerve (mostly the funny bone).
  8. Nobody said the creative process was pretty, but rarely has it made such electrifying TV.
  9. Suspenseful, tragic yet also uplifting in its audacious collision of fantasy and emotional realism, this haunting gem reminds us that we shouldn't speak ill of the dead.
  10. This show delivers the dramatic goods with painstaking authenticity each week, and even when it isn’t trying to make you cry, you can’t help but get emotionally involved in the lives of these instantly recognizable and compelling characters.
  11. Lavishly produced, deeply fascinating and chillingly provocative adaptation. [3-9 Oct 2016, p.22]
    • TV Guide Magazine
  12. Finally, cable's hit design show is back, still the best and most flamboyantly entertaining of TV's skill-based competitions.
  13. Vulgar and noisy, and often disgustingly hilarious, Dead Set is the perfect pop-culture poison for those of us convinced the world of Big Brother and its spawn is an endless night of the living dead, turning participants and fans alike into craven zombies.
  14. A fourth season of wryly amusing but often shockingly brutal backwoods mayhem.
  15. An electrifying military-gone-amok thriller that bridges the macho hardware of Tom Clancy with the suspense of paranoid Cold War classics from the '60s like Fail Safe and Seven Days in May.
  16. Dexter is real, all right. Real good.
  17. Simply put, the journey of Battlestar Galactica is one long, exhilarating headtrip.
  18. Graphically sexy and scary, and often wildly funny, True Blood, from Six Feet Under’s Alan Ball, turns Charlaine Harris’ rollicking mystery novels into a broadly entertaining, deliciously twisted slice of modern Southern Gothic.
  19. This is a fascinating experiment that feels like first-rate TV, and for subscribers old and (I'm betting quite a few) new, Cards is a great deal.
  20. With deft detail, and the usual sparkling mix of vivid archival footage and jazzy period music, we're treated to an evocative portrait of a young nation wracked by alcoholism and a debauched saloon culture, taking drastic measures to ban the manufacture and sale of alcohol.
  21. Critical without being overtly political, with stretches of boredom punctuated by the sudden chaos of firefights where it’s impossible to distinguish innocent bystanders from insurgents, Generation Kill is both timely and timeless.
  22. Animation has rarely felt so explosively, hilariously defiant.
    • TV Guide Magazine
  23. The crime they're investigating often takes such a back seat to the show's tricky structure and the all-pervasive angst you may once again wonder what exactly HBO has against the notion of narrative urgency. But be patient with this slow-burner of a disturbing, demanding drama. These detectives are truly fascinating.
  24. Trust me, Damages is worth it. And for those without access to DirecTV, worth the wait.
  25. An excellent eight-part British mystery reminiscent of The Killing and Broadchurch in its brooding anguish.
  26. Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey is science non-fiction at its most accessible and enjoyable.
  27. You really don't know what Being Human is like until you've seen this version of it. Can't recommend it highly enough.
  28. Everything about New Girl, from her goofy costars to the distinctively quirky writing, is irresistible.
  29. The show's hilarious screwball spirit is so infectiously appealing, even at it's most appalling, that all 10 episodes fly by in a wacky, icky rush. [30 Jan - 12 Feb 2017, p.18]
    • TV Guide Magazine
  30. One of the best new comedies of the season, and an instant bright light in NBC’s much-honored lineup.
  31. The second season... crackles with high drama, suspenseful twists, unexpected humor and emotion.
  32. Brooding in tone yet laced with mordant wit and tinged with sinister inference, The Game keeps us wondering what the Russian sleepers' end game might be. Having seen only the first half of the series in advance, I can only say that unraveling that mystery is so far darkly compelling fun.
  33. I didn’t know how 24 could top last season, but so far it’s working. And the edge of my seat is already frayed.
    • TV Guide Magazine
  34. This is sleek, sexy, smart, densely written and deliberately paced adult entertainment.
  35. Occupying familiar anti-hero territory with grim and often outrageous resolve, Ray Donovan is a sun-bleached noir and a character actor's paradise.
  36. It’s all very rude and often tremendously grotesque, but it’s a belly laugh a minute.
  37. Dexter's quality has ebbed and flowed over the years (peaking in the John Lithgow season), but so far, this season is looking like a riveting winner.
  38. HBO's brilliant and bleak The Wire may have saved the best for last.
  39. Bold and darkly funny. [26 Sep 2016-2 Oct 2016, p.17]
    • TV Guide Magazine
  40. ABC's Toy Story of Terror! is a delightful half-hour vignette of gags, action and self-empowerment, couching its never-give-up message in terrific non-stop entertainment.
  41. Excellent questions propel us back into the world of one of TV's most uncompromising dark comedies.
  42. Happily, our love affair continues. [24 Oct-6 Nov 2016, p.16]
    • TV Guide Magazine
  43. An endlessly fascinating seven-part foray into the most remote and unforgiving regions of the Arctic and Antarctic.
  44. Elegant and erotic in its savage yet sordid beauty, the third season of John Logan's stylishly literate monster mashup never loses focus despite being, quite literally, all over the map. [9-22 May 2016, p.18]
    • TV Guide Magazine
  45. Netflix finally achieves its eureka moment with a terrifically entertaining piece of original programming that's truly and bracingly original.
  46. For Fringe's small but loyal following, resistance is truly futile. We'll stick with this remarkable series to the end.
  47. Community is undimmed in its marvelously inventive wackiness. Trippy as ever as it continues to send up sitcom conventions with surreal zeal.
  48. The River is a terrifying heart-stopper, a cleverly cinematic supernatural adventure that takes us on a wild ride into an exotic heart of darkness.
  49. No matter the language, or the decade, AbFab lives up to its title, and its reputation.
  50. Boston Med reminds us that truth is often much more compelling and affecting than recycled fiction. Nothing is heightened or cheapened with newsmag-style manipulation on this series.
  51. Four seasons in, The Good Wife remains a marvel of clever plotting and tremendously witty ensemble acting.
  52. The only bleak aspect to this miniseries is that it doesn't last forever.
    • TV Guide Magazine
  53. Even in a better season, ABC's provocative and very funny Black-ish would stand out for its broad and biting satire of an uneasily post racial society seen through a very modern-family prism.
  54. Alpha House is satire at its most blistering and biting, delivered by a master of the trade: Doonesbury's Garry Trudeau, whose contempt for political cynicism, venality and hypocrisy doesn't keep the jaded protagonists of this bawdy, brazen comedy from being great company.
  55. This fall's best and most original drama taps a gusher of intrigue and twisty romance, with star-is-born James Wolk the most irresistible con man since Lost's Sawyer.
  56. Though the subject matter is wrenching, the tone here is more about emotional uplift, emphasizing the importance of bringing loved ones along for the fight.
  57. The show may be titled Hannibal, which for commercial branding purposes makes complete sense, but this is Will's story. And an absorbing, psychologically rich one it is, too--immeasurably smarter than The Following, more haunting than Bates Motel.
  58. It's a lot to digest but well worth the effort. [20 Apr - 3 May 2015, p.13]
    • TV Guide Magazine
  59. Tambor's revelatory, Emmy-winning performance as Maura has only deepened in its doleful and wry dignity, and if there's any complaint about the 10-episode sophomore season, it's that quite often there's just not enough Maura. [7-20 Dec 2015, p.16]
    • TV Guide Magazine
  60. This Technicolored kaleidoscope fable of life, love and perpetual whimsy restores my faith in TV's ability to amuse, enchant and entertain with endless invention and eye-popping style.
  61. It raises its emotional game almost instantly, as Alicia (the enigmatic and compellingly subtle Julianna Margulies) makes a fateful choice between her disgraced husband Peter (Chris Noth) and amorous boss Will (Josh Charles), though the decision is clouded by another character's manipulative deceit.
  62. This is classic Law & Order through and through, where only the wigs worn in court and the accents are significantly different. The London environs evoke the urban New York feel, and the cast here is top-notch, refreshingly reintroducing us to the notion of a lead detective who's been around the block a few times.
  63. The Hour teems with flawed but driven professionals who, even at their worst, never come off as ridiculous as Newsroom's fools' gallery. The hours just fly by
  64. The Americans redefines domestic espionage with its multiple layers of emotionally charged suspense.
  65. The Knick teems with forbidden passions and lives of unquiet desperation. [26 Oct - 8 Nov 2015, p.14]
    • TV Guide Magazine
  66. The genius of BrainDead, an enjoyably offbeat sci-fi/political satire hybrid, is in reminding us that it's possible to have fun without leaving one's brain at the door. [20-26 Jun 2016, p.17]
    • TV Guide Magazine
  67. A smartly conceived and well executed legal drama with a strong star (Julianna Margulies) at its core and, even better, a terrifically timely hook.
  68. Count me in. Nix knows you can't play the old cliches straight, so each shootout and car chase--and there's plenty of mayhem in the fast-paced pilot--is infused with an "oh, c'mon" over-the-top goofiness.
  69. Director Kenneth Branagh's culture-clash gimmick doesn't get in the way of the play's many intoxicating pleasures. This isn't samurai Shakespeare.
  70. With warmth and gravity, [David Bradley's] the heart and soul of this grand Adventure.
  71. The comic relief we have come to rely on in the macho camaraderie has more of a tinge of gallows humor this season, which isn't to say that Rescue Me feels like a show on its last legs, more like it's nearing its natural (or, given the frequency of Tommy's post-traumatic hallucinations, unnatural) end.
  72. If what you're looking for is a good scare that's cunningly and ruthlessly executed, be forewarned. The Following is the real deal.
  73. Cosby is in fine form as he mugs with that expressive face and riffs in his distinctive voice on his favorite topics of love, marriage and family. His timing is masterful.
  74. Magic Johnson narrates much of this astonishing story in a trademark genial manner, giving a storybook quality to the early chapters of instant fame, glory and goodwill.
  75. Appropriate Adult is a psychologically harrowing character study of emotional manipulation against a backdrop of utter depravity.
  76. Who the real animal is here remains to be seen, with surprising and mostly satisfying fallout in this taut legal thriller.
  77. A gripping 14-part docu-series reminiscent of ABC's Boston Med and Hopkins in its fly-on-the-wall, up close and personal look at the chaos and compassion in the emergency room of London's King's College Hospital.
  78. I watched with an escalating sense of dread, but still was unprepared for the powerful twists along the way.
  79. If I had to choose between this and watching Michael Scott take a final lap around the tired Office halls of Dunder Mifflin on NBC--its dreadful companion comedy Outsourced isn't even an option--I'm leaning toward the drop-dead-deadly assassin.
  80. Even at its most ponderous and indulgent, Mad Men casts a mesmerizing spell, and that's true throughout this less-than-satisfying but intermittently intriguing chapter.
  81. Mark Valley, droll and dashing, is long overdue a hit series, and I’d like to think this fast-paced piece of popcorn fluff could be the ticket. I’d watch Human Target for the retro-cool opening credits alone.
  82. It takes a while for this season to build up some steam--by the third episode, though, we're back in full murderous swing, with some gasp-inducing twist--and things stall whenever the focus shifts to subplots involving Dexter's police co-workers. But whenever Dexter is center stage, Dexter remains one of TV's most gripping dark entertainments.
  83. Asylum delivers a much more evocative nightmare gallery without losing any of the franchise's provocative, look-ma-I'm-screaming bravado.
  84. This is a solid hour that feels perfectly attuned to the CBS lineup, although it's less formulaic than what you usually find on Fridays.
  85. A traditionally funnier show, a distaff Louie. ... Adlon's sardonic sensibility is perfectly suited to a show that preaches female empowerment while delivering a blunt reality check. [5-18 Sep 2016, p.22]
    • TV Guide Magazine
  86. Unavoidably stagey in director's Richard Eyre's intimate adaptation, this tour de force is an ode to the actor's art and the sacrifice it entails. [23 May-3 Jun 2016, p.15]
    • TV Guide Magazine
  87. Actually, his greatest gift was that of imagination, and Fleming is especially enjoyable as it dramatizes the exploits that would give birth the immortal 007.
  88. Funky, freaky and fascinating, Orphan deserves to be adopted by any pulp-fantasy fan.
  89. This is smart, satisfying entertainment that brings new life to ancient history. [28 Sep - 11 Oct 2015, p.17]
    • TV Guide Magazine
  90. It’s a meeting of the brilliantly analytical minds, and a master class in acting, when Hugh Laurie clashes with Andre Braugher as a crafty but also damaged psychiatrist who holds the key to House’s future, in House’s tremendously entertaining and ultimately moving two-hour sixth-season opener.
  91. Lots to digest here. [23 Nov - 6 Dec 2015, p.15]
    • TV Guide Magazine
  92. This stark account of a family's downfall has the wrenching power of an Arthur Miller Classic. [15-28 May 2017, p.17]
    • TV Guide Magazine
  93. Everyone's ruthlessly cynical machinations can take on a wearying predictability if devoured hour after hour without a break.
  94. Adorably quirky and emotionally surprising, Eli Stone is a legal drama the same way Pushing Daisies (how I miss it) is a mere whodunit.
  95. It’s titillating without being truly trashy, because it also has heart--for that, thank Bil-lie Piper (formerly of Doctor Who), who brings wit and warmth, but also a crisp and unpredictable edge, to the tricky role of Belle by night/Hannah by day.
  96. Aidan Turner cuts a dashing figure as the reincarnation of Poldark, reviving an early Masterpiece breakthrough from the mid-70s with swarthy, romantic vigor. [8 Jun 2015, p.13]
    • TV Guide Magazine
  97. There’s plenty of life in this deluxe entertainment, with each episode expanding the world of friends and family who have a stake in Lux’s future. So far, I find myself rooting for just about everyone in this feel-good show that’s refreshingly unafraid to wear its feelings openly.
  98. A quietly absorbing elegy for old-school spooks, Page Eight bristles with jazzy intelligence.
  99. Though the premise is familiar, the emotional depth and shocking twists of The Missing redefine the genre. [13-26 Feb 2017, p.19]
    • TV Guide Magazine
  100. 24's first four hours, airing over two nights, aren't quite as electrifying as last season's opening act.... But none of these problems diminish the pulse-pounding pleasures of watching 24.

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