Uncle Barky's Scores

  • TV
For 780 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 66% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 31% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 1.6 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 67
Highest review score: 100 Broadchurch: Season 2
Lowest review score: 0 Ja'mie: Private School Girl: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 476
  2. Negative: 0 out of 476
476 tv reviews
    • 85 Metascore
    • 91 Reviewed by
      Ed Bark
    The Normal Heart grows in poignancy as characters we’ve come to know are affected or afflicted by AIDS.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    I’m Dying Up Here convincingly recreates both a period and the primal scream existence of would-be star comedians who seem to most enjoy trading very barbed insults during frequent gatherings at a local diner.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 91 Reviewed by
      Ed Bark
    Although it arguably strings things out a bit too much, this newest Witness is a watchable feast of strong portrayals and mostly sturdy plot threads. Jones is a fearless, full-immersion actor whose performance spares him no personal indignities.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 91 Reviewed by
      Ed Bark
    The starkest and grimmest yet with its depictions of migrant worker and teen girl trafficking. ... So as with When We Rise, applause, applause--even if it sometimes feels like one hand clapping.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 91 Reviewed by
      Ed Bark
    Young Sheldon ends up having a mind of its own, even if it’s a prequel to a long-established hit. Armitage and Perry in particular are a perfect pair as precocious son and protective but not overbearing mom. There’s an awful lot to like here, with high expectations not only met but exceeded.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 91 Reviewed by
      Ed Bark
    The Knick towers above previous original dramas Strike Back and Banshee, giving Cinemax a gold star on an increasingly crowded boulevard of bravura television.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 91 Reviewed by
      Ed Bark
    What you’ll see is the best broadcast TV cop drama of the season, with a dirty-to-the-touch sleuth played to the hilt by an actor who’s very much up for this.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 91 Reviewed by
      Ed Bark
    It's the strongest medical series since House arrived on Fox for an eight-season run that ended last spring. The genre badly needs a transfusion. And at last, here's a strong one.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 91 Reviewed by
      Ed Bark
    Gracepoint may not be superior to Broadchurch, but makes its own mark as fall’s best new broadcast network drama series--even if in some ways it’s not. Tennant’s estimable talents are the driving force of both versions, with each of the surrounding casts helping to keep him on point.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 91 Reviewed by
      Ed Bark
    Whatever becomes of Ragnar, Vikings has emerged in its second season as a series of appreciably higher quality. Its characters and storytelling, all within a world quite unlike any other on the TV landscape, have gone far beyond the cardboard stage.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 91 Reviewed by
      Ed Bark
    Edelstein’s pitch-perfect performance elevates Girlfriends’ Guide to one of the best new series of the season.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 91 Reviewed by
      Ed Bark
    Downward Dog obviously could have gone very wrong. Instead it gets almost everything irresistibly right, whether it’s Martin’s simple yet challenging life (“I’m only human,” he reasons) or the accompanying two-legged human endeavors that shift his mind into overdrive and this series into the realm of the near-sublime.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 91 Reviewed by
      Ed Bark
    It shines through and stands out as the fall season’s best new comedy among the major broadcast networks. ... Her character is a fraud who so far doesn’t belong, but Bell herself is the very best thing about The Good Place.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 91 Reviewed by
      Ed Bark
    Its characters and situations are alternately aggravating, humorous and, to a lesser extent, poignant. Parker and Church are fully in charge throughout as a perfectly imperfect duo. Yes, they’re both that good--in a series that demands just that.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 91 Reviewed by
      Ed Bark
    Potentially the best new comedy series of this season.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 91 Reviewed by
      Ed Bark
    Last Week Tonight probably needs to towel off a bit and present a more relaxed half-hour next Sunday. The premiere outing nonetheless showed considerable ingenuity and a willingness to take on topics that haven’t already been parodied to death.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 91 Reviewed by
      Ed Bark
    Season 3, which again will have 12 episodes, shows strong signs of fully regaining its bite, passion and fury.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 91 Reviewed by
      Ed Bark
    Through it all, though, Downton Abbey is still superior entertainment on a grand scale.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 91 Reviewed by
      Ed Bark
    Sunday night's sixth season opener, "Meet the Blacks," is a gem from start to finish. Two subsequent episodes sent for review aren't as finely tuned, but still get high passing grades.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 91 Reviewed by
      Ed Bark
    The four episodes made available for review keep Veep in its wheel house of low comedy executed at a high level.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 91 Reviewed by
      Ed Bark
    The real joys of Smash are its performances and production numbers, some fantasized, others part of the bare bones auditioning process.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 91 Reviewed by
      Ed Bark
    In these first three episodes, it shows no signs of getting stale.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 91 Reviewed by
      Ed Bark
    Traffic Light is winning and amusing without being loud and loutish.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 91 Reviewed by
      Ed Bark
    References to Beyonce and Michelle Obama are worked in without reaching too hard. And the "black experience," although hardly monolithic, resonates in ways that make this version quite special and different.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 91 Reviewed by
      Ed Bark
    No cameras were allowed for this [interviews with the band], making it sometimes difficult to decipher just who's talking during the otherwise brilliantly edited archival footage assembled by filmmaker Brett Morgen
    • 66 Metascore
    • 91 Reviewed by
      Ed Bark
    Few TV dramas are as thought-provoking or daringly opinionated. Sorkin doesn’t always get everything right. Who the hell does? But he writes with purpose, force and conviction, sometimes with a heavier hand than necessary.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 91 Reviewed by
      Ed Bark
    It's coarse and sometimes dirty to the touch, but pretty damned hilarious at crunch times. FX just might have the standout new comedy series of this season.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 91 Reviewed by
      Ed Bark
    John Benjamin Hickey’s point man performance leads the way, with his character’s demons and dilemmas already etched like fissures in his face. Carrying the weight of the world can be heavy lifting. Manhattan so far shows every sign of being able to shoulder the load.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 91 Reviewed by
      Ed Bark
    By the end of Episode 4, subtitled “It’s Not For Everyone,” the series is earning its mettle as a truly macabre, chilling and rousing war of attrition in which the winner will either take all or stop hell on earth in its bloody tracks.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 91 Reviewed by
      Ed Bark
    It's a genuinely chilling four-hour adaptation of the tireless horror-meister's 1998 bestseller.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 91 Reviewed by
      Ed Bark
    In short, a lot is very right with Get Shorty, which may well come calling again during next year’s awards season.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 83 Reviewed by
      Ed Bark
    Precious little, beyond his storied and enduring plays, is known about Shakespeare’s personal life or even his sexuality. So TNT is making him up as he goes along in a rousing, colorful drama that signifies more than nothing and indeed can often be quite something.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 83 Reviewed by
      Ed Bark
    There’s a gainful, functioning relationship among the four oft-miserable principals. And so far it’s still in place after the first three episodes.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 83 Reviewed by
      Ed Bark
    Spielberg has always had a facility for casting children and a fondness for the supernatural. In The Whispers he also gets the adult mix right in a bracingly good and shivery serial drama with much to show and tell in the first three hours.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 83 Reviewed by
      Ed Bark
    The best new crime drama of the fall season doesn't necessarily have to be an original idea. It just has to have the right people in place.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 83 Reviewed by
      Ed Bark
    Screenwriter Sarah Phelps has deftly adapted Rowling’s novel into a cautionary, metaphorical tale that pulls its weight and measuredly draws one in.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 83 Reviewed by
      Ed Bark
    It's a distinctive, signature series from a decidedly singular voice.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 83 Reviewed by
      Ed Bark
    Some of its mumbo jumbo may hurt your head, but the last words of Episode 2 are precisely on point. They whet the appetite for more, more.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 83 Reviewed by
      Ed Bark
    Creators Fey and Carlock instill Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt with the infectious positivity of their title character, who won’t give up, no, she’ll never give up. Still, her hard knocks life starts taking its toll in later episodes, draining some of Kimmy’s ebullience and replacing it with a little petulance. The sunny side up Kimmy is much preferable.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 83 Reviewed by
      Ed Bark
    So far this is solid and very picturesque entertainment, with a strong sense of foreboding built in.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 83 Reviewed by
      Ed Bark
    It's FX scoring again with another out of the box, jump-in-your-face series that most assuredly isn't for everyone but most definitely knows what it's doing.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 83 Reviewed by
      Ed Bark
    Purefoy and Williams are standouts throughout while Hendricks pretty much settles in. The bloody goings-on apart from their fractious triangle can be jolts from out of the blue. But there’s always some cauterizing banter just around the corner.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 83 Reviewed by
      Ed Bark
    Whatever your religious beliefs--or lack thereof--The American Bible Challenge is good for the soul. It's also the best new game show in years.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 83 Reviewed by
      Ed Bark
    Although Buscemi remains firmly in charge of this lead role, he's not the most interesting principal anymore. That pendulum swings to his wife of convenience, Margaret Schoeder (Kelly Macdonald).
    • 82 Metascore
    • 83 Reviewed by
      Ed Bark
    It may be quite a challenge to keep up the pace and the quality. But the bet here is that these guys will find ways to keep making it all work for them.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 83 Reviewed by
      Ed Bark
    The thrill of discovery is long gone for True Blood. But the thrill of a new season is still very much in play. The first three episode of Season 4 had just enough pulling power to keep me in the fold.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 83 Reviewed by
      Ed Bark
    It promises to be quite a juggling act, with Leary as balls-out as ever in the early going of his latest daring enterprise.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 83 Reviewed by
      Ed Bark
    Its downward slide shows signs of leveling off by the end of Sunday’s opening two hours. Danes’ Carrie is steelier than ever, her heart hardened to near-concrete while going about the exhilarating business of eliminating terrorists no matter what the collateral damage.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 83 Reviewed by
      Ed Bark
    In Ballers [Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson] brings it in full and then makes the sale.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 83 Reviewed by
      Ed Bark
    It packs a lot of intriguing plot threads into its first hour while also brimming with money-on-the-screen production values.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 83 Reviewed by
      Ed Bark
    Welcome to Sweden is more charming and amusing than laugh-out-loud funny. But its charms are considerable and the overall premise is bracingly unique.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 83 Reviewed by
      Ed Bark
    Some of Rae’s best moments during the six episodes made available or review are when her character squares off with herself in a mirror and rehearses what she should or shouldn’t say in big moments.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 83 Reviewed by
      Ed Bark
    Filmmaker Timothy Greenfield-Sanders (The Black List, The Latino List) might have done well to just keep the camera on [Carmen Dell'Orefice] and let everyone else hit the cutting room floor. But other former supermodels are quite interesting as well, among them Isabella Rossellini, Jerry Hall, Paulina Porizkova, Carol Alt, China Machado, Marisa Berenson and Lisa Taylor.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 83 Reviewed by
      Ed Bark
    Revolution, which has the overall look and feel of a big budget feature, delivers some consistently terrific action scenes.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 83 Reviewed by
      Ed Bark
    Douglas, Damon and company put on a crowd-pleaser that even Liberace couldn’t top during all those many-splendored stage performances. A film that could have been so very bad turns out to be pretty mah-velous.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 83 Reviewed by
      Ed Bark
    Fans of the fantastical can do far worse than Once Upon A Time, which manages to both stir the pulse and please the senses with its beautifully imagined medieval times.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 83 Reviewed by
      Ed Bark
    The producers of Pitch of course say that it’s a character-driven drama with baseball action in the mix but not a focal point of each weekly episode. Episode One, however, is appealingly diamond-centric, with Ginny’s travails and resolve (plus some well-chosen mood music) providing more than enough tension to engage even hardcore non-sports fans.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 83 Reviewed by
      Ed Bark
    The first four episodes of Season 4 are a little weak downstairs while still remaining at or near the top of the TV comedy class.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 83 Reviewed by
      Ed Bark
    It can be heavy-handed at times while also being overly tethered to somber narration from the renamed Offred (series star Elisabeth Moss), who used to be June.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 83 Reviewed by
      Ed Bark
    Baskets will never be a walk in the park. And it no doubt remains too dark for many. Some rays of light are showing, though, by the end of Episode 4. Nothing overly warm and toasty, mind you. But some welcome little thaws.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 83 Reviewed by
      Ed Bark
    It all makes for a promising start on a network whose best comedies invariably wind up on Thursday nights. Whitney is already there, and looks as though it just might belong.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 83 Reviewed by
      Ed Bark
    Caan’s perfectly clipped delivery and his daughter’s well-timed comebacks make Back in the Game at least a standup double if not a sliding triple.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 83 Reviewed by
      Ed Bark
    Elliot's (Rami Malek) haunted eyes and black hoodies, coupled with a blunt, abrasive take on humankind, propel Mr. Robot through a world of deep discontent and covert villainy.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 83 Reviewed by
      Ed Bark
    Dear Mom, Love Cher is both a pleasant and evocative way to spend an hour.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 83 Reviewed by
      Ed Bark
    Happy Endings quickly gets its game in gear and emerges as ABC's best new sitcom since Better Off Ted unfortunately failed to find an audience.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 83 Reviewed by
      Ed Bark
    An entertaining, amusing and at times poignant first season that also has some wretched excesses and predictable turns. But there are more than a few little unexpected delights, ranging from Ruth’s impression of Audrey Hepburn winning an Oscar for Roman Holiday to Sam’s learning that a just released real-life movie has upstaged his plans to direct a surefire crowning masterpiece titled Mothers and Lovers.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 83 Reviewed by
      Ed Bark
    The rooting interests are many and varied in a drama that’s held together by the strength of its convictions and characters.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 83 Reviewed by
      Ed Bark
    Rectify can be both hypnotic and heart-wrenching for viewers who have invested in these characters throughout the first two seasons. Season 1 remains the high point, though, and there doesn’t seem to be much time left to scale some of those peaks again.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 83 Reviewed by
      Ed Bark
    Despite its lead characters' fragile makeups, Free Agents is a niftily scripted, bracingly grownup comedy when in the hands of its two leads.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 83 Reviewed by
      Ed Bark
    Atlanta is very distinctively [Glover's] baby through and through.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 83 Reviewed by
      Ed Bark
    This looks like a drama with a heart, a pulse and also the ability to skip a beat.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 83 Reviewed by
      Ed Bark
    Too Big to Fail effectively follows the money while humanizing most of the moneychangers.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 83 Reviewed by
      Ed Bark
    Absent the trappings of official power and high-stakes infighting by Selina and her team, the very blue banter at times seems both juvenile and excessive. ... The open question is whether Veep can sustain itself as a comedy about a festering ex-president who’s desperate to remain relevant in civilian life. But it seems likely.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 83 Reviewed by
      Ed Bark
    Black-ish has a lot packed into its oft-amusing opening half-hour. It’s both fairly daring and also endearing, sharply written but with an overdose of narrative exposition. The kids and adults are all well-cast and there’s no laugh track to gum anything up.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 83 Reviewed by
      Ed Bark
    It’s an acquired taste worth acquiring--or at least sampling. Because you just won’t know until you’ve tried.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 83 Reviewed by
      Ed Bark
    Cinema Verite's strength is in dramatizing the off-camera seductions and betrayals that led to the Louds being vilified in many quarters before the entire family went on The Dick Cavett Show to both tell their side of the story and confront filmmaker Craig Gilbert.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 83 Reviewed by
      Ed Bark
    Rust and Jacobs are the drive shafts, though, keeping Love on all fours with characterizations that likely will keep most viewers invested.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 83 Reviewed by
      Ed Bark
    Season 5 of The Americans almost assuredly will round into form after a rather sluggish start compared to previous returns. In the initial three hours, the plot both thickens and sometimes congeals.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 83 Reviewed by
      Ed Bark
    For the most part, though, You’re the Worst keeps clicking as a decidedly “adult” look at thirtysomething infantilism.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 83 Reviewed by
      Ed Bark
    Crashing has enough mostly gentle amusements to keep it on track. And it’s increasingly easy to get on Pete’s side.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 83 Reviewed by
      Ed Bark
    As a fan from the start, I didn't love it, but liked it well enough.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 83 Reviewed by
      Ed Bark
    Moura as Escobar doesn’t bring the overall manic and sometimes comic intensity of Al Pacino’s Tony Montana in Scarface. He’s never dull, though, giving Narcos a thoroughly sinister presence who’s capable of anything and will stop at nothing.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 83 Reviewed by
      Ed Bark
    The Bridge so far looks to have more promise than [Fox’s The Following, NBC’s Hannibal, AMC’s ongoing Season 3 of The Killing]. It’s still early, though.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 83 Reviewed by
      Ed Bark
    Season 2 so far is still a watchable feast of decayed human flesh and frayed nerve endings.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 83 Reviewed by
      Ed Bark
    Under the Dome parlays solid special effects and an intriguing storyline, giving CBS’ a bracing breeze of fresh air during a summer season that previously has been a playground for Big Brother and “procedural” crime series reruns.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 83 Reviewed by
      Ed Bark
    Much of the performance footage is phenomenal in that respect. But in two hours time, the film could have dug deeper rather than coming to a screeching halt that almost rivals its subject’s high-pitched stage wails.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 83 Reviewed by
      Ed Bark
    Entourage looks as though it still has enough juice--comedy, drama and Drama-wise--to make its last season a keeper.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 83 Reviewed by
      Ed Bark
    As always, though, it’s all in the execution. And Supergirl’s plucky central character, very winningly played by Benoist, looks good to go for this season and beyond.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 83 Reviewed by
      Ed Bark
    Game of Thrones seems to be getting better all the time judging from the four episodes sent for review. It’s just that it also seems to be taking longer and longer to get there in the interests of servicing all the returning and new characters in play.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 83 Reviewed by
      Ed Bark
    Comic Book Men is a pleasant surprise and an overall splash of fragrant cologne on the smell test-flunking reality genre.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 83 Reviewed by
      Ed Bark
    Weiner’s end-game for his leading man does not appear to be brightly lit. Nor is Season 6 of Mad Men off to a particularly sparkling start creatively while we wait for the worst to come.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 83 Reviewed by
      Ed Bark
    The cast is engaging, the premise is intriguing and the genre long has been CBS' ratings-rich specialty.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 83 Reviewed by
      Ed Bark
    Intellectually challenging while arguably also going off the rails more than a few times, The Young Pope has its work cut out in luring a sizable audience.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 83 Reviewed by
      Ed Bark
    Living in the Material World falls short of Scorsese's terrific two-part PBS film, No Direction Home: Bob Dylan.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 83 Reviewed by
      Ed Bark
    Jackie Robinson connects all of these dots and gives a far fuller picture of the man than the pedestrian 2013 feature film 42 or 1950’s The Jackie Robinson Story, in which Jackie played himself opposite Ruby Dee as Rachel.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 83 Reviewed by
      Ed Bark
    Marry Me runs a solid second to ABC’s black-ish in the informal competition for best new comedy series of the fall season. Episode 1 gets off to a terrifically inventive start, with Wilson and Marino teeing things up before further hitting their grooves apart from one another.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 83 Reviewed by
      Ed Bark
    Outcast is beautifully composed cinematically, with a conveniently nearby woods providing an extra layer of creepiness. By the end of the initial four episodes, a spellbinding hook has been set, with the mythology enticingly unfolding amid week-to-week new vistas in exorcism.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 83 Reviewed by
      Ed Bark
    TNT's brighter, shinier Dallas makes an impressively staged re-entrance Wednesday night.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 83 Reviewed by
      Ed Bark
    The dialogue crackles and the first featured case (in Episode 2) is buoyed by a guest appearance from Christine Lahti (Chicago Hope) as a very self-assured prosecutor.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 83 Reviewed by
      Ed Bark
    In the end, Phil Spector succeeds on the strength of its two marquee thespians. Mirren is wonderful throughout, Pacino scores in double figures and they have enough scenes together to make it all well worth your while.

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