Under The Radar's Scores

  • TV
  • Music
For 3,830 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 37% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 59% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 6.3 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 SMiLE
Lowest review score: 0 Burned Mind
Score distribution:
3,830 music reviews
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    High Land, Hard Rain remains a career highlight.... Knopfler’s production has aged reasonably well, but the cover of Van Halen’s "Jump" (a B-side extra) shows how Frame’s perverse streak could have been managed more creatively.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Whether it's rage or just two guys trying to make each other laugh with dark humor, RTJ2 stands tall in a year of weak hip-hop.
    • 100 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Led Zeppelin IV and Houses Of The Holy feature the band at their peak, and these still hold up after decades of heavy rotation. [Dec 2014, p.90]
    • Under The Radar
    • 98 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Led Zeppelin IV and Houses Of The Holy feature the band at their peak, and these still hold up after decades of heavy rotation. [Dec 2014, p.90]
    • Under The Radar
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Yes, you could grab all of Bowie's massive discography, but his singles are so comprehensive that they stand out as a body of work on their own. Plus, Nothing Has Changed comes with the brand new song "Sue (Or In the Season of Crime)," which is remarkably unlike anything he's ever done before.
    • 100 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Doolittle 25 captures the best of this alt-rock landmark and offers up enough goodies to justify a full-blown celebration.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Gentlemen is every bit as relevant today as it ever was and it stands up better than the lion's share of its contemporaries. [Dec 2014, p.69]
    • Under The Radar
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Prass' stunning self-titled debut has been a long time coming.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    To Pimp a Butterfly is Lamar firmly embracing his place at the pulpit, looking into himself and out into the world simultaneously, and using his influence to paint a powerful, enduring picture of the black American experience. He's ringing the bell, letting us all know that the chickens are coming home to roost.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The most impressive is its cohesiveness ansibility. This is a record that never leaves you in doubt about who's driving.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    Unabashedly geeky and seam-splittingly stuffed with retro-futuristic flourishes, it's an utterly delight. [Oct/Nov 2012, p.129]
    • Under The Radar
    • 82 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    Deacon stretches the borders of his songcraft to the limit and it's a joy to hear a showman pushing every part of an orchestra like an overheating laptop. [Aug/Sep 2012, p.109]
    • 75 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    A magical album that takes the listener on a wondrous journey into a party where love is found, lost, and ultimately sublimated into an unsurpassable catharsis. [Aug/Sep 2012, p.108]
    • Under The Radar
    • 86 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    The album is filled with wonderful little moments that add up to create a remarkable whole. [Aug/Sep 2012, p.111]
    • Under The Radar
    • 81 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    Ultimately Menomena only confirms what many already know--that love and relationships are tricky--but damn if it isn't an interesting ride.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    Stripped down of any excessive ornamentation, it's the most raw incarnation of Bat For Lashes we've heard yet.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    The result is a more diverse and often louder album than its predecessor, Tomorrow Morning. [Jan-Feb 2013, p.86]
    • 81 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    Though it's been 10 years since his previous release, The Next Day is Bowie's most consistent record in twice as much time.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    Calling Bloodsports a comeback album almost seems to belittle just how strong a record it really is; it’s nearly as good as any they’ve put out before.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    This is The Knife's show--and we're not allowed to forget that. [Mar-Apr 2013, p.93]
    • Under The Radar
    • 71 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    It's all keyboards to the fore, their lightness lifting the album on to a wave of euphoria that gives Mars' vocals a dreamlike quality; this is less the Williamsburg house party of previous albums, instead a festival in a trance. [Mar-Apr 2013, p.94]
    • 81 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    Initially intending to discard the songs he wrote during that [dark] period, he instead salvaged many of them, which serve as something of a spiritual cleanse on the staggering Monomania.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    In the first half especially the format of fast song/slow song/fast song/slow song is adhered to a little too rigidly and, while the individual tracks are fantastic, it feels a little disjointed.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    It was only eight months ago that Wild Nothing treated us to a near-perfect album. Now they're just spoiling us.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    Overall, Trouble Will Find Me is another accomplished entry for a band that doesn't seem to know how to do anything else.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    The Carlisle, PA's artist's charming wordplay and gallows humor are magnified on his ambitious second album and Sub Pop debut. [Jun-Jul 2013, p.87]
    • 74 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    II
    Moderat II is nothing if not navel gazing; however, the introspection allows ideas to flow freely, and moreover the diverse styles of the collaborators this time make cosy bedfellows to create a genuinely beautiful, atmospheric record.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    The stronger tracks are weighted towards the first half of the LP, leaving the back end of the album's pace to suffer--but remove these minor issues and what remains is an audacious and exquisite work of gloomy beauty that should see MONEY on a fast ascent, leaving grand sonic architecture in their wake.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    A high-energy quartet of live tracks from the band's 1970 performance at the Isle of Wright Festival is indispensable, all in all making Higher! the ultimate Sly & The Family Stone document. [Aug-Sep 2013, p.103]
    • Under The Radar
    • 79 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    HAIM bounces from strength to strength on a pop rock journey that hits on nearly 20 years of touch points.