Urb's Scores

  • Music
For 1,126 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 63% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 35% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 1 point higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 73
Highest review score: 100 Miike Snow
Lowest review score: 10 This Is Forever
Score distribution:
1,126 music reviews
    • 95 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    To call Stankonia the album of the year would be easy. It would also be somewhat incomplete. The Atlanta duo's fourth album is more than simply a great record; it's a complex tome that enmeshes contemporary hip-hop values with a timeless Southern soul, while pushing the envelope damn near off the table. [#79, p.134]
    • 94 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Sonically, the joy comes from the triumphant, painstaking arrangement that undoubtedly went into the production of tracks like "Power," the aforementioned "All Of The Lights," and the album closing "Lost In The World."
    • 93 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Boatloads of fresh, clunky beats land ashore with narrative tongue trickery. [Apr 2004, p.86]
    • 92 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Dizzee's production style is impressive.... His flow is urgent and coherent. [Mar 2004, p.109]
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Either allow this the dignity of being played through a quality sound system or go invest in a pair of Beats by Dres. This is far less an album than a cinematic experience.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The Streets' novel pairing of dance music and wordplay hits the mark more often than not, and it's a step in a potentially interesting direction. [Nov 2002, p.93]
    • 90 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The lyrical presence and content of guests is what sets London Zoo apart from other dubstep producers.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    He possesses flawless rap skills, artiness, tasty hooks and smart production. There are lots of strong tracks, but his debut is highly enjoyable as a complete listening experience.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The anonymous producer behind the work of Burial is letting his dubstep sounds progress and on his impressive sophomore album he can be found chasing the transient hints of beauty to be found in the confines of urban desolation.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Simultaneously builds and deconstructs the strides made with Pause, resulting in an even more organic blend of quiet but muscular compositions. [Jun 2003, p.93]
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    But wait, you say you're sick of disingenuous irony? Well so are we, which is why Junior Boys is such an astounding relief, boarding on rapturous in their melancholy. [Jul/Aug 2004, p.125]
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    With Merriweather Post Pavilion, Animal Collective have proven themselves to be at the forefront of progressive pop, as deadly with their textures as they are with their melodies.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    One of the most rewarding and noisy records of the year. [Jan/Feb 2006, p.103]
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    His timing, precision, and craftsmanship in regards to everything having to do with this project has been impeccable. It's not a classic. But it's damn close.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Absolutely endearing. [Jul/Aug 2005, p.101]
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Armed with the most awesomely peculiar voice in American music, Waits understands the necessity of reinvention to keep the wheels turning after decades and decades of recording. The approach pays dividends on Bad As Me.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Overall, Science expands the band’s already-vast palette that continues to defy and recontextualize any definition of a “rock” band.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Give up now, guys, because it rarely gets better than this. [Jun 2006, p.113]
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Laptop pop that shimmers, shakes and twists like the precocious child of Aphex Twin, Spiritualized and the Beatles. [Aug 2003, p.89]
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Fey and whimsical, these songs are challenges that reward. [Apr 2006, p.96]
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Frankly, this record makes me wish I could snort bass lines through my ear holes. [Apr 2006, p.84]
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    M.I.A.'s singsong cadence is both child-like and streetwise, perfectly mirroring the smiley-faced menace of the electro-informed palpitations behind her. [Mar 2005, p.113]
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    An album this undeniably imaginative, consistent and immersive comes as a wonderful surprise and proof that maybe music isn't as lost as it seems. [Apr 2007, p.107]
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Manages to be both visceral and emotive, sprinkling the dancefloors with tears and sweat. [Mar 2004, p.111]
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    [A] solid sophomore effort. [Nov 2004, p.98]
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Experimental hip-hop and moppish guitar pop *can* go hand in hand. [#90, p.118]
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Unlike their inspirations, they've ditched the Marxist polemics in favor of dance-driven ambiguous tales of fumbled romance. [Jun 2004, p.84]
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Despite not being as mesmerizingly immense as some of his earlier output, the record is still a far-out journey of dramatics ("Restart" and "Levels"), hooky winners ("Robots" and "Think It Over") and real-world lament ("Flying" and "Think It Over"). In short, the wait paid off.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It seems semi-impossible for Montreal's held-in-holy-regard Arcade Fire to top their previous two albums, but with The Suburbs they seem to have at least met their own standard.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Her most anticipated follow-up is again the most cross cultural jam you'll hear this year. [Sep/Oct 2007, p.129]