USA Today's Scores

For 743 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 58% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 38% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 Generation Kill: Season 1
Lowest review score: 0 Lucky Louie: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 454
  2. Negative: 0 out of 454
454 tv reviews
  1. Even amid the excess exposition, you'll be able to spot a few enjoyable jolts, some clever, throwaway culture-shock moments and the charms of the show's two stars. Combined, they give the show more than enough room to grow into an entertaining weekly adventure.
  2. Thanks in large part to the grounded, nuanced performance from Collette, tonight's introduction effectively establishes both the moral dilemma at the heart of the story and the chess match the show intends to follow between Sanders and Carlisle.
  3. When The Goldbergs sticks to its loud, abrasive but loving family, it's fine. It's when it switches its focus to the '80s, complete with a voice-over designed to point out every difference between that decade and our own, that it gets into trouble.
  4. While Trophy Wife is an often-amusing comedy, it doesn't entirely work as a family comedy, because it has yet to convince us that these people could ever be part of the same family.
  5. Most every move creators Robb and Mark Cullen have made is a smart one, starting with casting an entirely fetching Maggie Lawson as the mother and the great James Caan as her gruff, constantly inappropriate father.
  6. This is a series about outcasts trying to find their way in, and it's often at its best in its quieter moments.
  7. Arnett is a master of fluster, and Bridges is befuddled charm personified. The revelation, though, for those who only know her from her Emmy-winning dramatic work, is Martindale, whose comic timing rivals the best in the business.
  8. It understands that its first job is to make us believe in Bonnie and Clyde and commit to their story. And that it does, perhaps not brilliantly, but well.
  9. You may not completely love this fourth vacation away from the 21st century, but lingering affection should more than carry you through.
  10. This is a show with many virtues. Now, if Huff can just learn the virtue of restraint, Showtime may finally have the hit it has been working so hard to find.
  11. Divorced from a believable social context, Queer too often plays like a voyeuristic tour of gay life that's only interested in the most outrageous sights. It doesn't have to provide an insight into every gay person, but it does have to paint a more believable portrait of these people, which means anchoring them in a real place and expanding their lives beyond sexual encounters. [1 Dec 2000, p.15E]
  12. The main characters are well-drawn and well-played, particularly by Mulroney, Taylor, Gross and (as you'd expect) Anderson, and the structure already seems reliably sturdy.
  13. It gets better, digs deeper and reaches farther than anyone might have predicted.
  14. Among the innumerable improvements here that lift Jack over Dad, start with turning the paternal lead over to Christopher Meloni--an actor who can convey warmth, brains and masculine menace with a glance--and giving him an actual person to play, rather than an insult-spouting cartoon. Then throw in making his wife a regular character, casting Rachael Harris and moving the story back in time, so that the son is now a more empathetic teenager, rather than an adult moving back home.
  15. Certainly, anyone looking for fast-paced, neon-lit entertainment will find Las Vegas one of the season's surprisingly better bets.
  16. It may be formula, but one where all the elements reliably click. [16 Sep 1992]
  17. The Marshal is retro action stuff, every week a different chase and capture, but the ungroomed MacBride has enough character - and so does the show - to distinguish it from TV's legion of mediocrities from Matlock to The Commish. [31 Jan 1995]
  18. How mad you'll be for the slice-of-strife romantic comedy of Mad About You may depend on your tolerance for the young-ish and restless, verbally glib and urban-ly neurotic. [23 Sep 1992]
  19. This slick new sitcom, from three former producer/writers of Cheers, might be accused of gliding along too smoothly, as opposed to soaring. But what a pleasant journey it promises to be. [19 Apr 1990, p.3D]
  20. There isn't much new in this northern Western, but the scenery is lovely, the acting is solid, and the mix of characters is just what you'd expect from the genre.
  21. While gratitude and humility are admirable traits, there were times in Monday's opening moments when Fallon risked taking them to uncomfortable extremes.... Luckily, he rescued the moment with one of the show's better bits. A seemingly offhand remark about an unnamed star owing him money for betting him he'd never get the Tonight Show job led to a surprise-guest parade.
  22. You get a lot of jokes per minute from Meyers, and on Monday at least, most of them worked.... Time of course will tell, but Late Night once again seems to be in good hands.
  23. Collectively, Inconceivable seems a bit desperate and confused.
  24. Ever since Sex and the City proved you could update Designing Women for a shallower audience by amping up the sex and removing the social content, TV writers have been trying without success to replicate the trick. Though Hot Properties feels too forced and a bit old-hat, it comes closer than most, thanks to a strong cast and a few genuinely funny lines.
  25. Colbert was an invaluable part of the Daily Show, but as the whole show, he's not enough and too much simultaneously.
  26. A comedy-laced caper requires a light, sure touch. Heist tends to plod.
  27. Whatever one thinks of the format, the briskly paced setup is effectively done.
  28. Too confused for a documentary, insufficiently dramatized for a movie, Path simply doesn't have the skill needed to support its intentions.
  29. It's one of those midlevel, decently entertaining dramas you're most inclined to watch when nothing else in the time slot excites you.
  30. With each episode, the show seems to move further from real life and the real Rome and off into some sex-crazed, soap-opera fantasy version of a place that has never, thankfully, existed before or since.