USA Today's Scores

For 858 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 58% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 38% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 1.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 Fargo: Season 1
Lowest review score: 0 Lucky Louie: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 514
  2. Negative: 0 out of 514
514 tv reviews
  1. Is Lights the show it was when it began? No. But it's still better than most anything else on the TV field.
  2. While Pillars can seem a bit comic, it isn't camp. The characters and their beliefs are treated seriously and with respect, and no one is without some virtue or some sin.
  3. It understands that its first job is to make us believe in Bonnie and Clyde and commit to their story. And that it does, perhaps not brilliantly, but well.
  4. The script paints the women too broadly while offering a few too many variations on the same youth-obsessed-culture themes. Still, darned if the women don't carry it off, at least well enough to bring you back for a second episode.
  5. The larger problem with Justice it that allows the plot to bury the characters.
  6. Still, even when Back is faltering, you flash back to the skill of its stars and to moments when the show succeeds in making you laugh out loud.
  7. Sunday's third-season premiere is not Desperate at its best, but it's better than most anything the show had to offer last year, particularly at the start. [22 Sep 2006]
    • USA Today
  8. Still, in keeping with USA's sunnier outlook, this is a far lighter show than Alias: less complicated, less morally complex, less deep and, while fun, just simply "less."
  9. If you're not too picky about historical accuracy, and not too put off by cheap-looking computer effects, you'll find much to enjoy in this entertaining adventure, built on a solid hero's-quest structure and bolstered by a terrifically engaging performance from Travis Fimmel as the hero-at-hand.
  10. In essence, Tyrant is a ruling-family variant on The Godfather, shifted from Italy and America to the Middle East. But don't dismiss the shift out of hand: That move is precisely what makes Tyrant so intriguing--and so troubling.
  11. If the show can maintain the quality of the pilot, [how long the show runs] might be quite some time.
  12. Falling somewhere in the middle of the dark/light scale between Gotham and Flash, tonight's promising premiere boasts a few good jolts, a welcome bit of visual flair, and an appealing star turn from Welsh actor Matt Ryan, who conveys just the right mix of tortured soul, biting wit and hunky hero.
  13. When The Goldbergs sticks to its loud, abrasive but loving family, it's fine. It's when it switches its focus to the '80s, complete with a voice-over designed to point out every difference between that decade and our own, that it gets into trouble.
  14. In total, the changes have led to a show that is much better, and is on much more solid footing, than it once was.
  15. While Trophy Wife is an often-amusing comedy, it doesn't entirely work as a family comedy, because it has yet to convince us that these people could ever be part of the same family.
  16. Charm is not a word you normally associate with the Day-Glo, drug-drenched '70s. Yet charm is the strong suit of That '70s Show. [21 Aug 1998, p.6E]
    • USA Today
  17. As a whole, the show is as cute and easy to like as its star, and that's saying something.
  18. At heart, Angel is another Whedon treatise on the need to accept responsibility and to move past atonement to engagement. But Whedon never overemphasizes his deeper meanings, and neither should we. [5 Oct 1999, p.1D]
    • USA Today
  19. Most every move creators Robb and Mark Cullen have made is a smart one, starting with casting an entirely fetching Maggie Lawson as the mother and the great James Caan as her gruff, constantly inappropriate father.
  20. Intriguing and involving, if sometimes odd for oddness' sake alone, Raines is a novel twist on one of TV's oldest formats: the single, super-intuitive detective.
  21. What Mantello projects, and the movie lacks, is a kind of raw, exposed-nerve drive. As a play, The Normal Heart was political theater: It strong-armed you, but it worked. The movie emphasizes the love story to the point where it borders on romantic fantasy.
  22. Though fun, the opener's skits are too short, and the characters too numerous, for any one joke to register. But give the show a week to settle, and the strengths of Ullman's concept come to the fore.
  23. Prison Break may not hold up as a weekly series; it's much too soon to tell. But by and large it works as a two-hour premiere special, one that grabs your attention from its first scene to its startling cliffhanger ending.
  24. While his problems serve to humanize him, there are times when they also overwhelm the story. And though Branagh plays each flaw and foible extremely well, the cumulative effect can be a bit tiresome.
  25. As much fun as Harper's can be if you're inclined to recline into it, the show was clearly produced with too little talent and, odds are, too little money.
  26. Too often, the writing stretches for cheap shock -- gags about phallic-shaped food and not wearing undies -- when the shock of Neil's culture clash already makes perfectly audacious comedy. [11 Sep 1992]
    • USA Today
  27. Russ's obsession with Milt's past overwhelms some of the upcoming episodes, and sentiment derails a few others. Still, the cast is strong, and in a season where so many series (some of them excellent) lean toward the grim, Creek's sunnier approach makes for a nice change.
  28. Despite the brain eating, producers have imbued the opening episodes with a sly sense of humor, a blend of sarcasm and bemusement, that McIver sells well.
  29. Be prepared for a first episode that is mostly setup, and for a few 24-like twists that seem out of place in a story that's meant to be more realistic. The further you go with Traffic, however, the more the story pulls you in. [26 Jan 2004]
    • USA Today
  30. Some of the lessons are laid on a bit thick. But the cast, including April Bowlby as Deb's best friend, Ben Feldman as her guardian angel, and Jackson Hurst as her boyfriend, sells them with a minimum of fuss and a light touch.

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