USA Today's Scores

For 1,143 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 42% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 Santa Clarita Diet: Season 1
Lowest review score: 0 Lucky Louie: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 680
  2. Negative: 0 out of 680
680 tv reviews
  1. Brilliantly performed. [29 Mar 1991]
    • USA Today
  2. In lesser hands, the disruptive flourishes would come across as style for style's sake; here, disruption is the goal. And in a lesser show, the characters would come across as a collection of social "types," chosen to represent their assigned issues. Here, they come across as real, deeply flawed people caught in a system that seems to care for none of them.
  3. The desire to examine issues that commercial television generally avoids, and the ability to do so in a manner that is intellectually challenging and dramatically satisfying, remains the same. None of this could be achieved without the stellar returning members of this now-anthology’s cast, led by Felicity Huffman, Lili Taylor, Timothy Hutton, Elvis Nolasco and Regina King.... Each turns in a performance that is just as riveting as the first.
  4. Unlike the sweeter, sillier, less edgy comedy often practiced by Daily's new host Trevor Noah, Bee came out in full attack mode--intense, a little profane, and frequently hilarious.
  5. What sets The Killing apart are its steady sense of dread, its dense atmospherics--that feeling that rain may at any moment pour from our sets--and its beautifully drawn characters.
  6. It's sometimes lyrical, other times cruel, provocatively adult and often profane. The downside: a suffocating ambiguity that may smother its hopes for commercial success. [25 Oct 1996]
    • USA Today
  7. Sorkin has created a funny, free-flowing comedy that more closely reflects the rhythms and look of a feature film. He may still have something to learn about the sitcom form, as witness the abrupt shift to sentimentality that ends the first two episodes. But when he's on his game, he provides moments of unexpected and acute insight that can almost leave you breathless. [22 Sept 1998, p.3D]
    • USA Today
  8. Like FX's Atlanta, the season’s best new comedy, Insecure is fighting, and winning, a two-front war: Exploring what's different about the black experience while reminding us that much of that experience is shared by us all. There’s nothing limited or limiting about Insecure.
  9. A fast-paced, funny show that has bounced back from last spring's post-strike slump.
  10. There isn't an actor or character you won't look forward to seeing again, and that includes those you may initially resist. Each is allowed to be right or wrong, each could exist in the world as we know it, and each can be uproariously funny in his or her own way.
  11. For those who were disappointed in the show's uneven fourth season, the best news is that, at least in the nine episodes previewed, Rescue Me is more consistent, more focused and more fun, with better stories for all of its characters.
  12. It's alternately funny and horrifying, and manages to make jokes about its criminal elements without being too exploitative or blasé. ... Much of the success of the show rests on Hader, though, and he is fantastic. ... The ensemble is superb as well.
  13. Heavily narrated and prone at times to the precious, Daisies is a show unlike any other, and not everyone will like it. But even those who don't can embrace it as a sign that creativity, confidence and capability have not fled broadcast for cable just yet. Here, they're alive and thriving.
  14. What lies ahead for Downton fans is a first-rate run of episodes that feels less hectic and more tightly focused on the family core.
  15. Grounded by outstanding performances from Sandra Oh (in her first regular-series role since leaving Grey's Anatomy) and Jodie Comer (The White Princess), Eve is an enthralling trip that follows a familiar path and then suddenly veers off course, never ceasing to shock and satisfy. The series manages to be as gripping as it is kooky and darkly funny, reveling in the tennis match between the two actresses.
  16. Combine the new story's broader scope with the show's newfound willingness to tap into current fears, and there's every reason to hope for an even more suspenseful season. And that's even considering the drag applied by Kim's credibility-straining subplot. [29 Oct 2002]
    • USA Today
  17. There are a few clumsy spills into melodrama, but overall this eight-hour effort is rousing, funny, frightening and heartbreaking--an affirmation of life and a condemnation of racism in all its ancient and surviving forms.
  18. There's no denying that the show looks a little worn, a victim perhaps of budget pressures that may have moved the series from cost-efficient to cheap. But even a reduced Lights is better than most TV series.
  19. It's fair to say that circumstances are once again forcing Don Draper (Jon Hamm) to ponder what he has and who he is. The beauty of the show, and of Hamm's performance, is the craft with which they convey that crisis through silence and visual cues.... What also holds true is that Mad Men remains a gorgeous show, one that is capable of sustaining an almost trance-like state.
  20. Here's a show full of delightful surprises, with something for everyone. It's hard to imagine anyone resisting its many charms. Twin Peaks too ponderous? Lawyer shows too heavy (and too many)? Sitcoms too silly? As Goldilocks said of the little bear's porridge, this one gets it just right. [8 Apr 1991, p.1D]
    • USA Today
  21. Like all of Burns' work, Jackie is beautifully done and blessedly free of the shoddy re-creations that slip into so many documentaries these days.
  22. Buffed to a typical HBO high gloss, Candelabra is a visual feast. But it shines brightest in those moments where it captures the rhythms of a relationship in its first blush of affection and its seemingly inevitable collapse.
  23. If any show deserves your patience, it’s Legion. Rewards await.
  24. The comedy ranges from silly to sharp, but it's seldom stupid and it's never mean-spirited – and the pair's talent is always on obvious display.
  25. It's cleverly written, slickly produced and features a sidesplitting star turn by Seinfeld's Patrick Warburton as the big, blue, well-padded superhero with scene-stealing antennae. But the best thing I can say also is the simplest: It made me laugh. A lot.
  26. Taken as a fright fest, pure and simple, Dead succeeds admirably well, capturing the terror and confusion of waking up in a world where you've gone from person to endangered-species zombie food overnight.
  27. The Night Manager overcomes cliches, objections and a few wobbly American accents, in large part thanks to the combined appeal and talents of Hiddleston, Colman, Laurie and Hollander. Together, they prove that action TV can be made at a high level of quality, and quality TV can be entertaining.
  28. Feud's focus seldom wavers from Lange and Sarandon, and rightly so. Neither woman really looks or sounds much like the person she’s playing, but that doesn’t matter: You accept the Davis and Crawford you’re seeing.
  29. Wise has been given a great chance to shine, and he makes the most of it, stealing scenes with such aplomb it may almost be a sin. Still, the show has to be carried by Harrison and Labine, and they seem up to the task.
  30. Fans of The Handmaid's Tale may just have a new obsession.

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