USA Today's Scores

For 1,125 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 41% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.3 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 Treme: Season 1
Lowest review score: 0 Lucky Louie: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 668
  2. Negative: 0 out of 668
668 tv reviews
  1. While the subject matter is heavy, Rescue Me is seldom heavy-going. It still makes times to revel in the boisterous camaraderie of its firefighters, and it still takes great advantage of one of the sexiest, funniest casts on television.
  2. Whittle’s role feels slightly underwritten in the first half of the season, but he’s an attractive, empathetic hero, a strong man who is smarter than he looks. And McShane is a pleasure to hear, biting into dialogue with the same enormous vigor and skill he brought to Deadwood. Together, they’re taking us on a road trip with no destination or clear purpose in sight. But the scenery is startling and the company’s great. And for fans of the book or Fuller, that is likely to be enough.
  3. Earl shares the look and heavily narrated sound of Arrested Development, but it has its own scruffy comic tone.
  4. Luckily, in Drew Barrymore and Jessica Lange, HBO has found precisely the right people to convey the peculiar blend of courage and craziness that were the two Edie Beales, daughter and mother.
  5. As the show progresses, the serialized aspect gets stronger and the tone gets darker, as characters who at first seemed good or benign begin to exhibit more complicated traits. It also adds more eccentric characters, in the same way Yost’s Justified did as it progressed.
  6. While the big set pieces are very funny, there are too many lulls between them. But odds are you'll come away believing the show will get better and hoping it does--because TV will be all the better for it.
  7. The episode played out like the slow-moving and exposition-heavy premieres of seasons past. ... But still, Thrones has often found as much greatness in its smaller moments as it has in wildfire explosions and murderous weddings. Sam highlighted this best. His bedpan-heavy montage was perhaps unnecessary, but added some levity and was an excellently edited bit of filmmaking.
  8. Some of House's callousness is an act, and sometimes the show lets the act go too far. But one of the series' primary strengths is the way the writers and the star keep us guessing as to where that act ends and reality begins.
  9. Mad Men is a joy to watch - the clothes, the clocks, the furniture, it's like a mid-century night's dream. But this is no mere period piece. It's a smart, complex drama that attempts to get through the facades that have always hidden the truth.
  10. In essence, Librarian is a summer movie blockbuster on a winter TV budget, and has all the virtues and flaws you'd expect from that odd pairing--including never taking itself too seriously.
  11. Imagine 24 devoting a substantial block of time to exploring the repercussions of one of its attacks, without moving on to the next threat, and you get the idea.
  12. This is how soaps are done today: with swagger, vigor and soul. Join in or get out of the way.
  13. She's Gotta Have It is a sumptuous character portrait, a deep and rewarding study of a black woman in our current era, this time portrayed by the dazzling DeWanda Wise. ... It manages, most importantly, not to feel dated. Its examination of topics including street harassment and gentrification feels vital.
  14. Like St. Elsewhere grafted onto L.A. Law, this is in the slick but endangered tradition of ensemble dramas showing heroes on the cutting edge of their vocation while personal lives entangle and unravel. [16 Sep 1994]
    • USA Today
  15. Much of the six hours made available for preview centers on Juliana and Joe--and at times their story can drag. But the redeeming glory of Castle is the expansive world of characters it creates.
  16. There's a great deal of humor and heart on display here, and a sense of empathy that draws you into all of the characters. You also get a wide range of fine performances, from Metz’s humor-tinged refusal to give in to self-pity to Brown’s expertly played conflict over how to deal with his father.
  17. No American-made option this weekend can compare.
  18. For two nights and four fabulous hours, this sequel to 1994's Baseball, still PBS' most-watched program, reminds us why baseball retains its hold on our imagination, and why Burns and Novick remain TV's pre-eminent popular historians.
  19. Unfortunately, you can feel it in the plotting, which is perfunctory at best, and woefully, repetitively tired at worst.
  20. Three weeks, three styles, three fine, fun hours.
  21. Leary is working with a fabulous cast, which is why he and co-creator Peter Tolan can dance so nimbly between realism and surrealism, drama and comedy.
  22. As smartly written as it is played, Episodes offers the comic pleasures, not just of clashing cultures, but of contrasting comic styles.
  23. Far more frequent are those moments that are likely to cause anyone who likes the show and the characters to smile or tear up, as on-screen and off, we all face the necessity of letting go of the past.
  24. I'm not giving up on the show, which was one of last year's best. But I don't want to spend weeks watching our Olivia suffer and their Olivia make Walter and Peter suffer. You have to give writers leeway to take you where they want to go--but at a certain point, commercial entertainment has to be entertaining, or there's no reason to watch.
  25. Once you get past the premiere, series are often a crapshoot. But Showtime made all 12 episodes available for preview, and through that run, the energy never flags and the performances get deeper and richer.
  26. Hip, bright and done with a great deal of flair, Alias is like some candy-colored -- and very violent -- comic book come to life.
  27. Despite the tragedy that drives its plot, there's something slight about Steel Magnolias--a slightness that at times might have benefited from a lighter, faster touch. But it offers the pleasure of spending a Sunday night with some terrific female actors.
  28. If only it all felt just a bit faster.
  29. Like many shows these days, Preacher is not for everyone, nor is it trying to be. But it will almost certainly work for some viewers, and it seems to have a good idea of who those viewers are and what they want.
  30. This is a show with many virtues. Now, if Huff can just learn the virtue of restraint, Showtime may finally have the hit it has been working so hard to find.

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