Variety's Scores

For 1,330 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 36% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 61% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 8.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 56
Highest review score: 100 Curb Your Enthusiasm: Season 4
Lowest review score: 10 Fashion House (2006): Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 525
  2. Negative: 0 out of 525
525 tv reviews
  1. While hardly a breakthrough on any level--indeed, about as unoriginal as the genre gets--if the goal is simply to keep the torch flickering between the Games and the fall season, mission probably accomplished.
  2. Those who enjoyed "The Closer" will still find something, if probably not as much, to like about this closer, too. Or really, "Closer 2."
  3. It's all fairly predictable.
  4. While the story does capture a sense of the times--and provides intriguing glimpses into the Manhattan of 160 years ago--as constructed, this can't help but feel like "Deadwood" lite.
  5. Coma still provides a few arresting images of what happens to the coma victims, but there's simply too much silliness in the overwrought second half.
  6. The show isn't necessarily bad; if only it thought with something other than its schmeckel.
  7. Made in Jersey looks reasonably polished, without doing much to plant its hook particularly deep.
  8. Arrow certainly looks polished (having David Nutter direct a pilot virtually insures that), but there's only so much action an hourlong drama can afford, and the characters necessary to sustain the series are, initially, strictly two-dimensional, even with the island as a go-to flashback.
  9. This is really just a protracted, more explicit (virtually a prerequisite, given the venue) "Mission: Impossible," spreading its caper across multiple episodes. Yet even with bursts of bloodshed, Hunted bogs down in the episodes previewed.
  10. Former "Revenge of the Nerds" stars Carradine and Armstrong (who helped develop the concept) do appear to have fun, but after the opening kick of seeing them reunited in this fashion, even that begins to yield diminishing returns.
  11. Like a lot of newly minted grads, Underemployed doesn't qualify as an instant success. Yet viewed in the context of its ambitions, neither can it be dismissed as an underachiever.
  12. Baio doesn't do much to elevate the limp material, but he doesn't sink it either.
  13. More like great water-cooler gossip than actual true-crime material, the self-deprecating humor helps but doesn't exactly distinguish the series from other examples of this genre.
  14. Jungle Gold uses every available editing trick to heighten the tension and get the audience rooting for Scott and George, but the approach is so steeped in xenophobia and Great White Hunter short-hand this might as well have been made in the 1930s.
  15. The show doesn't feel authentic enough to be convincing, nor silly enough to rise to the level of worthwhile sitcom.
  16. As a whole, the project cries out for the voices of third-party historians--or at least some voice, beyond the grainy newsreel footage and dramatic readings by actors, other than Stone's.
  17. The series doesn't generate nearly enough highlights to merit a filibuster-proof yea vote, much less a ticker-tape parade.
  18. All told, there's enough here to stick around a little while, but this is one of those premises almost designed to strain plausibility over time.
  19. The show has some unorthodox elements, but feels fairly cliched in most of its beats, largely serving as an excuse for bouts of grisly violence and gratuitous sex.
  20. The '80s setting does allow the show to be more frank in tackling issues like sex and drugs, but other than that, the premiere deals in typical teenage girl stuff, the sort one can find in any number of ABC Family shows.
  21. While The Taste certainly works hard to foster a sense of excitement and tickle the palate, this appetizer feels like just the latest half-baked competition idea that doesn't deliver.
  22. Created by David Schulner, the series has done itself a disservice by hewing away from the fantastic and toward the mundane.
  23. Arrested Development’s long-awaited encore is like a lot of TV development--namely, an interesting idea that was more exciting on paper.
  24. Season two yields modest improvement thanks to shrewd cast additions, augmenting the pleasures of Julia Louis-Dreyfus.
  25. Ultimately, though, the story boils down to its central love triangle, with the sides stretching out a little too long as viewers wait for Tietjens to return home and choose whether to pursue happiness and risk public humiliation, or remain in his shattered and unhappy marriage.
  26. To their credit, the producers do keep things interesting, for the most part without resorting to the cheap tricks that have characterized the vastly overrated “American Horror Story.” Nevertheless, the premise becomes its own creative prison, fostering a hurry-up-and-wait attitude as the story metes out its examples of the things that make this duo, well, different.
  27. Even if you’re skeptical about the carefully massaged drama, it’s hard not to admire a single show so meticulously accessorized with that many commercial points of entry.
  28. Jackie remains watchable thanks primarily to Falco, although the best moments are almost invariably dramatic, not humorous.
  29. These hours rely on devices like seeing dead people, while detouring from the central character’s selfless concern about her family to explore subplots that are, almost without exception, relentlessly ordinary. It’s a shame, since Linney still delivers compelling moments.
  30. While there are creepy moments--and the show continues to peel away the layers of what makes a monster while questioning whether its protagonist truly is one --Dexter remains well short of the operatic highs it reached in previous cat-and-mouse games between the protag and well-matched foes.