Variety's Scores

For 2,164 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 36% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 60% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 7.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 58
Highest review score: 100 Transparent: Season 2
Lowest review score: 0 Marvel's Inhumans: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 881
  2. Negative: 0 out of 881
881 tv reviews
  1. This gritty series about L.A. cops does have a niche cable sensibility, but it's exceptionally well made, with sharply drawn characters and, happily, more intense focus on the best of them in these initial patrols.
  2. Continuing Warner Bros. Animation’s welcome strategy of aiming its DC-derived animation at comics-loving adults as well as tykes, the writing is crisp and even above-their-heads literate.
  3. Homicidal clown Twisty (John Carroll Lynch puts the horror back in Horror Story, and runs neck and neck (and neck) with Paulson’s Tattler twins as “Freak Show’s” most intriguing breakout character.... Elsa initially comes off as more cartoonish and less complex than Lange’s previous turns. That changes for the better once Lange lays bare the vulnerability beneath Elsa’s hardened exterior in a few poignant scene.
  4. The comic’s unexpected swerves and inspired segues are often the best thing about the specials.
  5. The challenge of Legion will be to make David’s quest for wholeness more than the sum of its flashy and often captivating parts. But the humane core of the drama offers a reason to hope for the best.
  6. Good casting (including Mehcad Brooks as Superman’s pal Jimmy Olsen--now hunky, African-American and going by the grown-up moniker James) and Benoist’s deft handling of her dual role create hope for the show going forward.... finding the right star, and constructing a credible pilot, are big parts of the battle. Thanks to those strengths, if the producers can sustain the playfulness and action without going overboard on Flockhart’s character, there’s reason to believe this “girl” can fly.
  7. Surprisingly good.
  8. It's a handsomely mounted production that will surely be welcomed by English majors the world over, especially those who would rather watch their homework than read it.
  9. Deep in the Heart of Texas can feel a bit dated--given that it’s two years old, there are references to Ebola and the infamous recording of Ray Rice in that elevator--but it also contains a long set piece in which Chappelle hilariously imagines Lil Wayne as a gravel-voiced detective on “CSI.”
  10. Striking the right balance with such a character-driven construct can be perilous, but with the casting and initial tone, The Affair appears well ahead of the game, to the point where many will find further attendance compulsory.
  11. [Daredevil] begins season two on an uneven note, occasionally feeling as if he’s taken a detour from dark and gritty into the realm of Sam Peckinpah movies, complete with slow-motion bullets and blood sprays. Stick with it, though, and the show blossoms.
  12. It’s the moral murk that Burnham must wade through that gives Discovery its tantalizing possibilities.
  13. The major stumbling block remains that it's odd to contemplate seeking algorithmic solutions to crimes or having a guy who got beat up a lot in high school answering 911 calls. So even with Charlie functioning as a kind of adjunct to the bureau, it's muddled how they'll consistently capitalize on his abilities. [17 Jan 2005]
    • Variety
  14. In the mostly undistinguished roll call of new comedies, it goes to the head of the class.
  15. "Looking" distinguishes itself by moving past the tired cliches involving gay life to a more matter-of-fact, intensely personal snapshot of these characters and struggles, told in a serialized fashion.
  16. Dense and smart, Cards is still partially skating by on reputation--and for Netflix’s purposes, that’s good enough.
  17. Good Guys isn't a perfect construct, but it's a well-executed one--albeit more a breezy, busy diversion than appointment TV, placing greater reliance on guests than its limited supporting cast to prop up the principals.
  18. For those whose similarly themed projects are still on the launchpad, they could do worse than to take a look at Showalter and Wain’s road map in devising their quirky trip back to the future.
  19. Allegiance certainly won’t win many points for originality, but the episodes do clip along on a serialized basis, keeping the principals constantly scheming to stay one step ahead of the two sides between which they’re caught.
  20. Soapy, well cast and boasting uniformly strong performances, the show's servant-class stories still don't measure up to more regal doings, [but] the series proves enjoyable.
  21. Writer-director Mike Robe does a nice job of exploring the repercussions of life choices.
  22. At first, the show feels a trifle frustrating, inasmuch as Christine dives into this strange new world without divulging almost anything about who she is, or wants to be. ... Gradually, though, that becomes its own kind of mystery, and helps foster a pervasive sense of unease, one that makes this Experience feel far more ambitious than something like Showtime’s “The Secret Diary of a Call Girl.”
  23. Certainly nothing here is "groundbreaking," as WE's production notes claim, given past exercises such as Michael Apted's landmark "7 Up!" series. Yet High School Confidential is the kind of personal document that merits attention--inviting curiosity not just regarding how these teens navigated through high school, but what their lives will be like seven years from now and beyond.
  24. Nothing here is dramatic enough to be genuinely or consistently interesting, as if they couldn't get waivers to present any of the juicy stuff that might give the show sizzle. The result is a high school version of "The People's Court."
  25. By alternating significant time between Cathy, Christopher, Carrie and Corinne, the ADD storytelling in Petals ensures there’s never a dull moment--or a sensible one either--and the events retained from Andrews’ novel are just bonkers enough to make the approach pay off.
  26. SEAL Team makes a strong effort to bring the human element of the fight against amorphous terrorists to the broadcast audience. And to the show’s credit, the emphasis of the show is less on its gung-ho action sequences than it is on the close-knit team of people conducting those complicated missions. There’s an attention to detail about military life and forays into faraway lands that lends an atmosphere of the appreciably romantic. And by the end of the pilot, the ensemble feels rock-solid.
  27. In premium TV terms, the series is probably too derivative to be scored as a clear winner. But in terms of possessing qualities that should inspire the audience that does tune in to stick around until match point, Red Oaks serves up a pretty good game.
  28. While "Hot Properties" doesn't generate big guffaws, there's a breezy quality to it that makes for good company at what's mercifully a lower decibel level than its lead-in or the WBthe WB's competing "Living With Fran."
  29. Last Tango returns for its third season, having drifted somewhat from the spark that initially made the show so bracing, becoming a more conventional family soap, albeit still with wonderful moments.
  30. Still fun in fits and starts, the series begins with enough energy to help it coast along, abetted by rock cameos that provide an additional helping of street cred.

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