Variety's Scores

For 1,634 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 35% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 62% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 8.3 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 57
Highest review score: 100 Curb Your Enthusiasm: Season 3
Lowest review score: 10 Rising Star: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 641
  2. Negative: 0 out of 641
641 tv reviews
  1. Stacey represents one of those too-good-to-be-true movie teachers, but VanCamp possesses such innate likability that she can make that sense of commitment believable. Nor does it hurt that the producers did an impeccable job casting the various students, including Liam McKanna and Paola Andino as two of Stacey's more significant pupils.
  2. Debut is plenty funny yet Fox has a tough job ahead trying to lure ["Beavis & Butt-head"] audiences, which may grow tired of the comic targets, or "The Simpsons" crowd, which may find the antics too restrained. [10 Jan 1997]
    • Variety
  3. While the kids are alright, Pietz alone makes the series recommendable
  4. If the lavish production doesn’t quite strike gold, it comes close enough to encourage further exploration.
  5. Familiar as it all sounds, series creator Michael Rauch plucks most of the right chords.
  6. Based on the two episodes available for preview, Restaurant is admirably low on trash-TV antics, lending it additional family-friendly appeal in the 8 p.m. hour leading into another competition, "Celebrity Apprentice."
  7. Oxygen's The Glee Project--designed to give an unknown performer a seven-episode arc on the Fox series--debuts amid a glut of music-related TV contests, including "The Voice," "America's Got Talent" and "Platinum Hit." Still, undeniable Gleek appeal should be enough to make the fun if formulaic show a basic-cable breakout.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    A serviceable thrills-and-chills skein that stands out as one of the cabler's more ambitious projects thanks to the subject matter as well as ace production values. [14 June 2002, p.18]
    • Variety
  8. West doesn’t much resemble Burton, but he embodies him, capturing a proud man who is both battle-scarred and spent, like a bullfighter who’s been gored a few times too many.... Directed by Richard Laxton and written by William Ivory, Burton and Taylor can’t help but feel somewhat slight, due to its structure and focus.
  9. Far from running out of tricks, the fifth season of "24" opens with a bang, incorporating an element of mystery that promises to be more satisfying than the somewhat disappointing fourth day in Jack Bauer's very busy life.
  10. The idea Selfridge was a serial philanderer adds an interesting layer to the character who, despite being the boss, actually blends into the large cast, in a series that’s full of romantic triangles, hunger and striving, and where good-looking waiters are urged to cater to the needs of wealthy socialites.
  11. It’s all fairly lightweight and nonsensical, but in an entertaining way.
  12. The show's polished exterior, however, has seldom scratched the surface hard enough to find anything deeper underneath. Vince's career odyssey back from "Medellin" could provide just that--the season-long hook to make a show already on Hollywood's A-list match that with an actual A-game.
  13. Charmed has an entertaining little way about it, with Spelling and company mostly striking a solid balance between escapist slap-schtick and mild horror. If the opening hour isn't terribly concerned with issues of believability, relatability and self-parody (pilot is notably short on humor), it's likely a saucy enough brew for the WB's target 12-24 demo to swallow. [7 Oct 1998, p.5]
    • Variety
  14. Hostages has a polished feel to it, and the limited-series approach certainly makes the prospect of committing to the show more palatable, inasmuch as it won’t be able to explain away its central predicament forever.
  15. The series has a good deal of fun with what such notoriety might have been like in the late-19th century, with children jumping rope to Lizzie’s name, and all the locals casting sideways glances at her in church.
  16. Legit proves periodically funny, and oddly charming. And as elusive as both of those qualities are in primetime, that alone makes it too legit to quit.
  17. The River is one of those pilots it's hard not to admire, even if the longterm prospects for its journey remain shrouded in mystery.
  18. Much of the tone is supplied by an acting ensemble that keeps it light and unforced, combined with some sharp editing. There's a bit too much voiceover, all from Duhamel's McCoy, but it is effective in establishing his mindset. Las Vegas, like the city itself, has guilty pleasure written all over it.
  19. As presented, Dating in the Dark mercifully makes the orchestrated search for TV romance a little less deaf and dumb than it could have been.
  20. Assuming this is ramping up toward the finale, the key players are engaged in ways that prove occasionally shocking and disarmingly funny.
  21. Told with great earnestness and a Hans Zimmer score, The Bible hits only a few conspicuously awkward notes.
  22. New Girl possesses ample energy, even if it almost instantly violates "Seinfeld's" old "No hugging, no learning" rule. Then again, heart is part of its DNA.
  23. Although Julianne Moore's uncanny mimicry of Palin's verbal tics will surely attract praise, the movie revolves around an equally compelling performance by Woody Harrelson as GOP strategist and campaign operative Steve Schmidt.
  24. It's a familiar formula, to be sure, but handled with enough panache and conviction to invest the BAFTA-honored pic series with an element of freshness.
  25. Although the cynical part of me wants to mock it, [the] series definitely taps into the feel-good reality wave, and strictly from a practical standpoint the procedures are far more laudatory than augmented boobs or, in the case of "Extreme Makeover: Home Edition," a new porch.
  26. It’s always challenging to capture the essence of such artistry on film, and Lapine comes pretty close.
  27. While this sci-fi lark is essentially just another cog in TV’s annual invasion of mindless summer escapism, as we’ve seen time and again, capturing that tone and feel isn’t nearly as easy as it looks--one reason it’s nice to see Wyle and company soldiering on.
  28. James Gandolfini lends his celebrity to the project, which would have benefited from either greater focus or more time, but nevertheless delivers a sobering message regarding the psychological wounds war inflicts even on survivors.
  29. Always fun, the first two hours of the FX drama's fourth season are also meandering, introducing several new players, but as yet failing to betray much about how or when they'll intersect. Fortunately, star Timothy Olyphant by himself remains ample reason to tune in.

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