Variety's Scores

For 2,067 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 35% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 61% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 7.9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 57
Highest review score: 100 The Wire: Season 3
Lowest review score: 10 Fashion House (2006): Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 833
  2. Negative: 0 out of 833
833 tv reviews
  1. The series has a good deal of fun with what such notoriety might have been like in the late-19th century, with children jumping rope to Lizzie’s name, and all the locals casting sideways glances at her in church.
  2. Legit proves periodically funny, and oddly charming. And as elusive as both of those qualities are in primetime, that alone makes it too legit to quit.
  3. The River is one of those pilots it's hard not to admire, even if the longterm prospects for its journey remain shrouded in mystery.
  4. Much of the tone is supplied by an acting ensemble that keeps it light and unforced, combined with some sharp editing. There's a bit too much voiceover, all from Duhamel's McCoy, but it is effective in establishing his mindset. Las Vegas, like the city itself, has guilty pleasure written all over it.
  5. Not all of the characters pop, but Incorporated keeps things moving at a smart pace.
  6. The Good Fight has to incorporate a host of supporting characters and cases of the week into the backstories of its multiple leads, and the results are occasionally a bit bumpy and scattered. All in all, however, it’s a promising endeavor, even if the lead characters are so understandably stressed that it’s a pleasure to check in on amusing scene-stealers like Eli Gold’s enterprising daughter, Marissa (Sarah Steele), and Denis O’Hare’s delightfully eccentric judge.
  7. As presented, Dating in the Dark mercifully makes the orchestrated search for TV romance a little less deaf and dumb than it could have been.
  8. Assuming this is ramping up toward the finale, the key players are engaged in ways that prove occasionally shocking and disarmingly funny.
  9. Told with great earnestness and a Hans Zimmer score, The Bible hits only a few conspicuously awkward notes.
  10. Reservations about Into the Badlands center on supporting roles; it’s unclear if a set of younger characters will be as compelling as the ones played by the more seasoned actors.... All in all, however, Into the Badlands is a welcome addition to the television scene.
  11. New Girl possesses ample energy, even if it almost instantly violates "Seinfeld's" old "No hugging, no learning" rule. Then again, heart is part of its DNA.
  12. Although Julianne Moore's uncanny mimicry of Palin's verbal tics will surely attract praise, the movie revolves around an equally compelling performance by Woody Harrelson as GOP strategist and campaign operative Steve Schmidt.
  13. It's a familiar formula, to be sure, but handled with enough panache and conviction to invest the BAFTA-honored pic series with an element of freshness.
  14. Although the cynical part of me wants to mock it, [the] series definitely taps into the feel-good reality wave, and strictly from a practical standpoint the procedures are far more laudatory than augmented boobs or, in the case of "Extreme Makeover: Home Edition," a new porch.
  15. It’s always challenging to capture the essence of such artistry on film, and Lapine comes pretty close.
  16. While this sci-fi lark is essentially just another cog in TV’s annual invasion of mindless summer escapism, as we’ve seen time and again, capturing that tone and feel isn’t nearly as easy as it looks--one reason it’s nice to see Wyle and company soldiering on.
  17. James Gandolfini lends his celebrity to the project, which would have benefited from either greater focus or more time, but nevertheless delivers a sobering message regarding the psychological wounds war inflicts even on survivors.
  18. Though a little strange, the mixture is never unsettling, in large part because this efficient and reasonably amusing sitcom is safely encased in several other familiar TV formats.
  19. More often than not, Man in the High Castle doesn’t seem to know what it’s about but to its credit, it still manages to engage with its ideas in interesting, evocative ways. The show can sometimes produce moments of astonishing and quiet loveliness, even when the scope of the plot has gotten so strangely overbearing that the characters could be all Atlases, holding up the weight of the world.
  20. The “Superstore”-“Telenovela” combo not only strikes a blow for diversity by presenting two shows with Latina leads (Eva Longoria headlining the other), but actually delivers some laughs in the process. And even if they’re not actually quite as cute as a panda, for NBC, that’s still pretty, pretty good.
  21. Always fun, the first two hours of the FX drama's fourth season are also meandering, introducing several new players, but as yet failing to betray much about how or when they'll intersect. Fortunately, star Timothy Olyphant by himself remains ample reason to tune in.
  22. While the series possesses enough pleasures, guilty or otherwise, to warrant a secure place in the DVR queue, it still feels like a program that is finding its way--seeking a balance between the seedy underbelly of L.A. glamor and the most dysfunctional of family dramas, connected by a fixer who’s mostly a downer.
  23. There’s a brazen quality to Doubt that is frothy enough to be silly but grounded enough to take on topical, controversial subjects. It doesn’t require too much effort to let unfold, and with such a talented, deep bench of actors, it’s usually enough to watch them bounce off of each other while flaunting their impossibly stylish accessories.
  24. Some of the plots travel in expected directions, and you won’t mistake this brightly lit show for something on AMC, but there’s sincerity and some grit to Recovery Road.
  25. 24" works best when the show doesn't take itself too seriously -- incorporating just enough sobering geopolitics to establish a credible foundation before indulging in wild flights of counterespionage fancy. Moreover, having one villain drive the plot for a handful of episodes before being supplanted by another has added greater satisfaction and closure to the program's high-wire storytelling.
  26. The selections in the first two episodes possess compelling strength, whimsy and ambiguity in both the stories and the characters, providing a solid transformation from radio to TV.
  27. Saving Grace is less about its procedural storytelling than it is about simply creating a venue to showcase Hunter's undeniable smallscreen star quality.
  28. Sure, Shannara, which harks back to the golden age of syndicated genre fare, is a standard quest journey in which there are troll, gnomes, living trees and magic books, and characters say things like, “If Allanon is here, there are dark days ahead.” But there’s conviction in the show’s execution.
  29. For all the talk about tech, nothing here reinvents the wheel, but the action is crisp and the dialogue breezy.
  30. Light and breezy, Hotel Babylon is a fairly simple conceit, built around the employees at a high-class London hotel and the guests they serve.

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