Variety's Scores

For 1,472 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 36% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 61% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 8.3 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 56
Highest review score: 100 Arrested Development: Season 2
Lowest review score: 10 South Beach: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 569
  2. Negative: 0 out of 569
569 tv reviews
  1. Yet if the premise sets up a promising square-off of titans, the premiere retreats to a rather predictable, time-killing murder mystery, which serves to establish Lamb's new role, but also smacks more of CBS' stodgier procedurals than a character-driven drama.
  2. Producer/director/co-writer Jeffrey Roth spent extensive time with the man and endeavors to humanize him, but ultimately delivers a film long on biography and short on insight.
  3. No one associated with Political Animals needs to hide under the covers, exactly, but nothing here qualifies as a game-changer, either.
  4. This is, quite simply, a Frankencom, stitched together from pieces of other comedies. To their credit, Sheen, the talented cast and seasoned writers know how to make it all look slick and polished.
  5. [Even with Matthew Perry,] the familiar game plan and trappings make it at best a crapshoot as to whether Ryan and his wounded heart will, well, you know.
  6. For every arresting image, there's a lot of wandering around in the overgrown woods, and reason for skepticism as to whether audiences will patiently stick with the show.
  7. The cast is certainly strong...[however] the formula could become awfully repetitive if the primary characters' story is augmented each week by a "B" plot regarding another resident, which is what transpires in the pilot, and doesn't prove particularly compelling.
  8. The truth is once you've moved beyond the set-up, the only real moment that counts is the inevitable reunion, when the women return and the men, presumably, tell them just how much they were missed and how indispensable they are.
  9. While hardly for everyone, to a genre-savvy crowd that can appreciate the joke, score it as a near-miss.
  10. The second chapter isn't much more eventful than the first.
  11. The Americans is an intriguing and provocative concept.... The execution, alas, initially isn't worthy of the premise, becoming fairly standard spy stuff, and relying heavily on awkward flashbacks to fill in the backstory.
  12. It's the program's central device--the prolonged trial-like exchanges between Hooten and whoever might have tripped up--that overwhelm the more promising elements, and keep "Monday Mornings" from being worthy of a Monday-night appointment, despite the tonal compatibility with its "Dallas" lead-in.
  13. Viewed charitably, the series isn't bad as a sort-of "Dallas" knockoff, though it's worth noting TNT's rebooted "Dallas" covers similar territory in a more satisfying manner.
  14. It's just too bad a show paved with such an enticing premise doesn't get a little deeper under your skin.
  15. Some viewers will no doubt find this intriguing, while others will be quick to dismiss it as overwrought poppycock. Fortunately, the show has Anthony Edwards at its center, bringing a much-needed Hitchcockian Everyman quality to his role as Hank Galliston.
  16. If it's not high art, the moody exercise achieves a level of atmosphere and momentum that makes it work as a mild diversion, and the plot and pacing pick up in subsequent hours.
  17. In the Flesh has potential, even if it just shuffles along at times en route to driving home its point.
  18. As presented, it’s moderately suspenseful but also an awfully dry, unimaginative approach to the story, with McCormack’s personality and natural sense of humor completely lost in this straightforward cop role, and Davidovich burdened by Frankenstein makeup. Barr, at least, is convincing as the ladies man with a dark streak, however familiar that might be.
  19. Goofy, moderately sweet and too rarely funny, it’s a natural thematic companion to “Modern Family,” if not an especially strong one.
  20. Accompanied by its own behind-the-scenes Web series, Inside Amy Schumer still represents more the promise of talent than one fully realized.
  21. Kelley is no stranger to writing comedy, even if it’s traditionally been in service of hourlong shows, and between his gifts as a wordsmith and Williams’ frenetic energy (best displayed in a closing-credits outtake sequence), The Crazy Ones has potential beyond what the pilot demonstrates.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Madigan Men feels absolutely dated at times, but rises above stale humor due to Byrne and Dotrice's pleasant deliveries and vet helmer James Burrows' brisk direction. [5 Oct 2000, p.20]
    • Variety
  22. These latest episodes represent a tentative first step toward seeing whether the show can re-ascend to those heights or, conversely, plummet into an abyss of implausibility. Like so much else pertaining to Homeland, at this point, it could go either way.
  23. What ensues is pretty typical of the genre, but it’s still kind of a risible kick, if only for how seriously the show takes itself.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Don't expect Dave's World to be as funny as the Dave Barry newspapercolumns that the series is supposedly based upon, but there are enough chuckles and a solid cast, led by former "Court" jester Harry Anderson, to keep this one going.[20 Sept 1993]
    • Variety
  24. Written and directed by Matthew Arnold, the pilot does a nifty job of capturing the tics of such unscripted programs, from the convincing casting and first-person interviews to the shaky camerawork and overhead helicopter shots. In fact, the producers have done their mimicry a little too well; it’s easy to zone out on the blah, blah, blah of the contestant banter while waiting for the twist to actually happen.
  25. Although writers Vince Marcello, Mark Landry and Robert Horn try to have fun with evolving teenage idioms and technology, the sequences between musical interludes occasionally feel as much like punishment as the sinew connecting the story.
  26. Wonderland is equally handsome [as "Once Upon a Time"], but behind those virtual sets lurk many potential flaws. An appealing Alice certainly helps matters, but past performance reduces the likelihood of a fairy-tale ending.
  27. This ABC comedy is the equivalent of a big fat pitch over the heart of plate, and will need to get mileage out of more characters, but what’s here has the potential to hold its lineup spot between leadoff hitter “The Middle” and ratings slugger “Modern Family.”
  28. While it’s fun to see the band Chicago drawn into a subplot about the sexual history of Nathan’s ex (Amy Ryan)--or savor an in-joke playing off the name of HBO CEO Richard Plepler--even some of those intricately woven gags feel like a bit of a distraction.

Top Trailers