Village Voice's Scores

For 764 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 47% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 50% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 4.3 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 67
Highest review score: 100 The Naked Truth
Lowest review score: 10 God Says No
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 48 out of 764
764 music reviews
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    In the beginning, Neubauten's music sounded urgent and vital, created out of necessity; now it sounds effortless and natural, moving forward because it has no other place to go.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Merges jazz, pop, and the conservatory in a heady and original way, accessible and seriously playful.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    And though it's as good as, if not better than, its predecessor, the album's not bowling people over, either. Maybe its rap-folk hybrid is just too much of the same. Or maybe we just can't identify with the first-person "Black Jesus" like we can the third person of yore. Because maybe this album's greatest strength is exactly what's holding it back: the narrative.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The record is a female country album for people who dislike female country albums. It's not too smooth, too shrill, or too Stepford.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is Blige's most rhythmic album ever, and even the ballads that can drag r&b down here bristle with bumping beats.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's a pastiche festival that works in the interest of groove every bit as hard as it does for knowingness and yuks.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    [A] marvelously sophisticated, extremely political album.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Tortoise may be the only band that can match the everything-mashup steez, sonic skills, conceptual ambition, and breakbeat heat of the Roots.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The carping is intercut with elegiac little pauses that align Blink 182 with a branch of punk rock you could trace back through the Replacements and Ramones Leave Home, to the more ethereal of early Who songs.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The sheer mass of sound, the density, the volume, the elaborate little codas at the end of every song are designed to impress and certainly do.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    "Hip-hop soul" is supposed to be for r&b singers, but Ghostface's latest redefines the term.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The record sounds like it came a year or so after Endtroducing--which is to say, it goes a little deeper in summoning Gothic textures and awesome drum samples, and arrives as a delayed, well-fitting follow-up to a landmark.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    You Are Free demonstrates a subtle, hopeful change in sentiment--a relief from Cat Power's melancholy.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Godspeed's records will either blow your head off or leave you shrugging, depending on where your personal quest for freedom is taking you.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Searing white light and scrappy vocals are replaced by the druggy stomping and weighty grooves of '70s cosmic metal, yet the band's alluringly youthful braggadocio remains.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    After one listen to I Get Wet, you'll swear you've heard it before... but somehow, you've never heard anything like it.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The rhythms have grown more techy and layered, wilding with drill-happy 16ths (on "Busy Signal," he and L.A.'s like-minded Daedalus cut up a human beatbox then go machine-gunning with piano notes), or throbbing and crackling out of an electronic ether (the radio-transmission lurch of "Detchibe") as though he's been studying glitchy Europeans.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Where Kid A couldn't help but be seen as a reaction to fame and intense scrutiny, Amnesiac illuminates what Radiohead are now, and will likely be for a long time: an evasive, willfully experimental rock band who feel uncomfortable in their own skins.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    RJ and his sampler wander the record crates of shared memory, and come up with progressive rock and Northern soul songs that have little to do with anybody's idea of revival.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Guitarist Nick Zinner's greatest advantage over his contemporaries is his complete lack of an attention span.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's... really different. And oblique oblique oblique: short, unsettled, deliberately shorn of easy hooks and clear lyrics and comfortable arrangements. Also incredibly beautiful.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    TP-2.com is a magnum opus of the genre, milking both Kelly's recent reflection and his baser inclinations for all they're worth.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Vespertine is an album for small curtained establishments, for taking your "little ghetto blaster" onto back streets, for intimate and precious occasions.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Too bad FM radio still has its head stuck up its pre-1980 ass, 'cause the album is so FM—so non-single-driven AOR—but in such a cool robot-from-the-2004-future-sent-to-save-rock-in-the-past sort of way.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Jurassic 5 value commitment over calculation; that is, they keep it real.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The record floats a Leonard Cohen-Robert Smith vibe or two, but references fail this outfit.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Fuckin A outsexes the nuevo new-wavers with its dry-hump hum.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The trick to their aural freak-out is not too different from those in the past; it hides in the arcane black box manned by Noel Harmonson. The echoplex, with its Möbius strip of tape loop, warps the guitars and yowls like parallel sheets of Mylar and sheets of acid, focusing the entire band into ray-gun pulses that match the pounding of Utrillo Belcher.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    I miss the penis jokes, I sincerely do, but when life's little fuckups sound like cosmic conundrums--and here I'm referring not just to the new disc's big choruses but, more importantly, to its snaking structures and unrelentingly urgent harmonies--now-and-then comparisons fail.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The arrangements, referencing indie-rock more than participating in it, pile on heft to the small-life tragedies: Matt Brown's sax toughens up Spoon's welterweight ranking, while [Eggo] Johanson's piano gives it roots, rag, and bonus rhythm.