Village Voice's Scores

For 764 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 47% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 50% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 4.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 67
Highest review score: 100 The Naked Truth
Lowest review score: 10 God Says No
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 48 out of 764
764 music reviews
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Searing white light and scrappy vocals are replaced by the druggy stomping and weighty grooves of '70s cosmic metal, yet the band's alluringly youthful braggadocio remains.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Fauna's first half is cosmic pop turmoil of the highest degree, as only a master songwriter could create.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Like Rubber Soul and Revolver, or Bowie's Low and Heroes, Deserter's Songs and All Is Dream function as bookends rather than as separate works, though the latter, recorded under the cloud of [intended producer Jack] Nitzche's absence, does strike a few too many morose chords.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's... really different. And oblique oblique oblique: short, unsettled, deliberately shorn of easy hooks and clear lyrics and comfortable arrangements. Also incredibly beautiful.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Music breaks down neatly into three discrete sections, on which I'll hang the very technical names the dance part, the good part, and the dirge part. The good part, so named because it's really good, accounts for half of Music's 10 songs, conveniently nestled into tracks four through eight inclusive, so you can play that section over and over again without interruption.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    A song or two will keep you warm and contented, but take in the full album and April will smother you worse than a down comforter in July.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The Gaslight Anthem's profound affection for and commitment to their forebears are just as present as they were before, but only here does the band sound as eager to bury as to praise them.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    RJ and his sampler wander the record crates of shared memory, and come up with progressive rock and Northern soul songs that have little to do with anybody's idea of revival.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Part of what makes Of Montreal notable is the quantity of things Barnes does impeccably.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    These guys were rubbish as careerists, essentially banishing much of their stronger material to the depths. So think of The Power of Negative Thinking as the great unveiling.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Street Horrrsing is, to your dad's ears (unless your dad is Lou Reed), a whole lot of noise. But what virtuosic, complicated noise it is.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Collins's way with a hook has blown up into a stack of tunes that stick, ranging from cranked-up faux-arena rock to spine-shaking rhythm and staccato bounce.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The enjoyable What I Do is similarly assured and clunker-free, but it also returns to the emotional compression that Drive often detoured.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Filled with startling jump cuts and puzzling reverberations, The W is the best-produced Wu-affiliated album since GZA's 1995 Liquid Swords.... Eight years after their first single, it's a thrill to hear Wu-Tang sounding so unhinged. But it's also a pain in the ass. With nine voices, nine styles competing for your ear, even the most carefully crafted Wu-Tang album flirts with chaos, and the listener is left to separate milestones from mistakes. The W bursts with inspiration, but what does it all mean? You can't help wishing there was someone in charge.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It remains to be seen if The Lady Killer will continue his hot streak, but it should-it's one of the best records of the year, and also his most commercial, and that's not an insult.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Wisely, The Golden Age is less mediated, its variety achieved through smartly arranged curveballs like the Calexican waltz 'I Know That's Not Really You.'
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The man has an uncanny ability to transliterate the sounds only record collectors can hear--early Thin Lizzy, for instance --into a passionate ache anyone can love.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Sure, the novelty helps, and if it recurs too often, the glee of hearing Nelson and Marsalis mesh will diminish. But hearing once how they play with and against each other is a real treat.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    As usual, the excellent mix--opaque but sunlit--helps; as usual, we eagerly await her next album.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The result's a bit grungy, sure--but there's also an undercurrent of dark, sinister country and blues that suggests they're not just rehashing old times.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Coldplay's new record is a little edgier, trancier, and more conversational than their last. It is called A Rush of Blood to the Head, and in waves and swells of major tunes and frisky then looping time signatures, that's just about the effect it has.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    As profound as anything in his oeuvre.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Whether it inspires bosom-heaving, jersey-rending, or chopper-flagging, Explosions in the Sky will have true believers again faint with praise.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A superbly sequenced set chock-full of clever entendres, oozing with existentialisms on par with those of Buhloone Mindstate and De La Soul Is Dead.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Too bad FM radio still has its head stuck up its pre-1980 ass, 'cause the album is so FM—so non-single-driven AOR—but in such a cool robot-from-the-2004-future-sent-to-save-rock-in-the-past sort of way.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    DITC will still melt your speakers. Jack Endino's clean yet full-tilt production fills out the sound, but it's drummer Des Kensel's ability to push forward and hold back--not simply pound monochromatically from start to finish--that truly creates the thriving, volatile atmosphere here.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    No surprise, Ribot's versatility as a guitarist is the main draw here.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The production style displays unique shadings and shifts in sound, suggesting an attention to sonic detail emblematic of a drummer with the deep musical (especially jazz-related) knowledge that ?uestlove owns. But this may also sustain the most oft-heard complaint against the Roots: the seeming inability of their lead vocalist, Black Thought, to unfailingly deliver "hip-hop quotables."
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Like all of her wordplay--as written, sometimes spontaneously spoken, and occasionally sung--it fits.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Easily dance record of the year, Confessions is an almost seamless tribute to the strobe-lit sensuality of the '80s New York club scene that gave Madge her roots, which she explores with compelling aplomb.