Village Voice's Scores

For 8,531 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 37% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 59% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 6.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 55
Highest review score: 100 West of Memphis
Lowest review score: 0 Jersey Guy
Score distribution:
8,531 movie reviews
  1. The year's most ingenious and original animated feature.
  2. This wondrous, absorbing little picture covers a great deal of winding meta-territory, reflecting on the ways in which a single family's story can be told—or maybe, more accurately, examining the idea that there's no such thing as a "single story."
  3. Laughton understood Agee's proximity to Grimm vaudeville, and fashioned the most intensely expressionistic movie of its day.
  4. The fights Virunga documents couldn't feel more urgent. This is one of the year's most compelling and important films.
  5. Raw and insistent, bold and brawling, Girlhood throbs with the global now, illustrating the ways an indifferent society boxes in the people who grow up in project-style boxes.
  6. To my mind, the greatest film by Iranian master Abbas Kiarostami.
  7. Unclassifiable, expansive, and breathtaking.
  8. Nonchalantly freaky and uncommonly pleasurable, Warm Water may well be the year's best and most unpredictable comedy.
  9. A crash course in history, politics, and social science, Valentino's Ghost is both sobering and illuminating, and its execution is thrilling.
  10. The film is consistently visually stunning in a way that's ever more rare, and Sissako's bravura moment of filmmaking is embedded in a scene on a river that seals the Tuareg patriarch's fate.
  11. This film, a great one, demands a follow-up.
  12. It might be the most lonesome film about a tropical vacation we've seen, and the greatest film ever made about the weird socioeconomics of tourism.
  13. In every respect, this unclassifiable movie is an amazing accomplishment.
  14. For passion, originality, and sustained chutzpah, this austere allegory of failed Christian charity and Old Testament payback is von Trier's strongest movie--a masterpiece, in fact.
  15. Yudin pulls lovely philosophical grace notes from his subjects as they illuminate some universal truths from their very specific world.
  16. A perfectly paced and performed character study of a woman raising a child on her own who must contend with a heinous act of violence.
  17. Ultimately, what makes Knocked Up a terrific film--one of the year's best, easily--is its relaxed, shaggy vibe; if it feels improvised in places, that's because Apatow trusts his actors enough to let them make it up as they go, like the people they're playing.
  18. This is a film to see and then see again, to soak in and marvel at and -- like its director -- try to keep up with.
  19. Ernest & Celestine -- a contender for this year's best animated film Oscar -- is pure delight.
  20. Very little in Under the Skin is clear at all. Its secrets unspool in mysterious, supple ribbons, but that's part of its allure, and its great beauty.
  21. Thanks to Lynch's expert pacing and modulation of narrative tension, even viewers who already know the outcome of the film's central incident will likely be pulled to the edges of their seats.
  22. Vera Drake puts the passion in compassion. Building up to a shattering conclusion, Leigh's movie is both outrageously schematic and powerfully humanist.
  23. The film's genius is how completely it tunes in to his 
experience, delicately outlining Joey's private moments of shame, elation, despondency, and pride.
  24. Extraordinary, groundbreaking documentary.
  25. If Secret can leave the viewer despairing, it's also hugely inspiring, thanks to Mino. She's one of the cinematic heroines of the year.
  26. The most measured, classical film of their (Coen Brothers) 23-year career, and maybe the best.
  27. [A] strange, singular heartbreaker of a film about life still flourishing in the most inhospitable conditions.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Zodiac exhausts more than one genre. Termite art par excellence, it burrows for the sake of burrowing, as fascinated by its own nooks and crannies as "Inland Empire."
  28. The Canadian painter-photographer-filmmaker-musician gives full vent to his genius in this exhilarating perceptual vaudeville, titled for the "central region" of tissue that acts as a conduit between the brain's two hemispheres.
  29. Jesse Moss's documentary The Overnighters is a heart-wrencher about the clash between economics and ethics. Its story sounds like the sort of dry news blurb you'd skim over in the Sunday paper but unfolds into an epic tragedy.

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