Village Voice's Scores

For 764 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 47% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 50% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 4.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 67
Highest review score: 100 The Naked Truth
Lowest review score: 10 God Says No
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 48 out of 764
764 music reviews
    • 87 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It's profoundly self-serious, expertly workmanlike, occasionally transcendent, but lacking that childlike volatility, that glorious willingness to look and sound ridiculous. It's rare that so much nonetheless leaves you wanting more.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Many of the lyrics on Party Music amount to no more than slogans, maxims, opinions.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    A handsome channel 13 complimentary tote bag of an album that polishes his image as the fantasy rebellious son who hangs at socialist bookstores and swipes your Gram Parsons records.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    And while Holmes can't be faulted for applying cut-and-paste to mood and drama as well as sounds and beats, his tracks' lack of freshness still adds up to an ambitious letdown.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    He sounds as genuinely hurt and confused as any of us, but if he's gained any insight into that hurt or confusion, he's not about to express it.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The new album isn't terrible, just dull.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It's all very outsized and uppity, falling right in line with the current dictum in dance music that every song must be able to be mashed up with both Kanye West and this week's indie-rock star.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    In terms of sheer intensity of sound, it's as if the Comets of old have been miniaturized and are looking up at you from inside a Grateful Dead lunch box.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Nas doesn't ruin a decent beat, but rarely is he able to improve one.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Though there's little of the powerpuff zoom associated with the New P's here, uptempo grins like "On the Table" make denying the pleasantness of it all impossible.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Beautifully engineered, Circus sounds chocolaty and recombinant even when it doth protest the Enlightened Guy angle too much.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    The last 10 or so minutes of the CD veer between bursts of riff noise more smoothly recorded than expected and washes of music to watch soft porn by, indicating the charm of being proudly abrasive and busy is wearing off.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    The most disappointing aspect of this record is that Beck has fallen into the trap of confusing earnestly repeated clichés for personal lyrics.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Of course it's a gimmick, but about half of it works anyway.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    II
    This is a definite step up from the all-pall-and-no-pulse feel that made Espers' 2004 self-titled album too stuffy.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    For all that sonic triumph, the lyrics feel like an empty gesture, sub–Trapper Keeper woe-mongering that'll thrill suburban teens but sounds odd coming from guys old enough to know better.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    This time, Steve Lillywhite and the other producers assembled simply construct a U2 album in miniature, mixing in the Edge's processed-guitar trademark whenever you fear they're straying into unforgivable un-U2ness. That's just not enough.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    While Mercer's writing is still more satisfying than that of his peers, filler tunes like "Pam Berry" and "Black Wave" are a far cry from the tenacious stuff that made Chutes the subject of lavish hyperbole.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Too quick and severe on the brakes, Black Mountain stunt their own grandiosity in the name of dynamics or patience.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    With 10 tracks adding up to a mere 34 minutes, this follow-up is much more wan and insubstantial than its predecessor.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    [It] doesn't pack the out-of-nowhere melodic turns that enlivened Runners.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Receivers is what die-hard fans refer to as the record too far.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Imagine the cheerful fatalism of "Float On" without the hooks, which is bizarre: Hooks would seem to be Marr's specialty.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    When he flexes his craft, he corrals multi-tracked vocals of himself that coast over static guitar arpeggios, like a priest who prefers to clack his rosary beads in his bedroom rather than pray aloud in a chapel with his peers. If there's a Lord, he's grateful for the devotion, but for eavesdroppers, it does get tedious.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    As if hell-bent on rewarding brand loyalty, however, Brooks does himself in by recycling his typical subjects.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Yorke's voice... has rarely sounded better, although the context ultimately disappoints.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    And what a voice it is, dominating Body Talk Pt. 2 to a severe degree. Her alto, which sometimes mimics but never goes as far out as Kate Bush or Cyndi Lauper's, is like a fluorescent light on her music, washing out everything in its wake. If you love her voice, great; if you don't, it will cloy you to death.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Her lyrics are a tricky thing-their literalism is both their greatest strength and a crippling weakness.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The Breakthrough improves on 2003's Diddy-helmed misfire Love & Life but lacks the character of 1999's eclectic Mary.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Abandoned Language is film noir compared to the group's previous claustrophobic slapstick, and unfortunately that newfound seriousness isn't such a good thing.