Village Voice's Scores

For 8,059 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 36% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 60% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 7.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 54
Highest review score: 100 Secret Sunshine
Lowest review score: 0 Poolhall Junkies
Score distribution:
8,059 movie reviews
  1. Writer-director Anthony Lover takes such a kid-gloves approach to his handicapped co-star that he achieves the opposite of the intended effect: Every time Scott enters a scene, it's as if someone just told the entire cast "Whatever you do, don't say 'retard.' "
    • 44 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    American Cannibal, something like the (mock-)doc equivalent of "The Producers," really, really should've been funnier.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    I find it hard to believe that Conway bamboozled half of London simply by announcing his name, and it's regrettable that the filmmakers premise their picture on such improbable gullibility. The real Conway was assuredly slier than his bio-pic incarnation; he ought to have been played by Sacha Baron Cohen.
  2. Those two age-old foes--science and blind faith--tango yet again in this noxious slice of Biblical horror about a series of Old Testament plagues being visited upon a Louisiana bayou backwater.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Half-new at most, this "Running With Scissors"–type tale of a precocious, effeminate teen who gets hot for teacher while prepping for a life in the arts isn't evidently autobiographical. Neither is it funny--or poignant or insightful or remotely worth one's time.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Neel is a compelling subject, but she's more alive in one of her paintings than in all of the voluminous video footage her grandson thrusts upon us.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Though Momo is dedicated to "the missing children and the children who are coming to save the world," the most provocative question it asks is whether, with its conspicuous product placement, the film was secretly backed by Coca-Cola.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    The result packs all the hilarity of a museum installation on The Semiotics of Silent Comedy.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Unmotivated jitters and flash-zooms abound, needlessly complicating a flagrantly elaborate premise.
  3. As a longtime writer on "The Sopranos," Terence Winter has steered clear of most of the hoary organized-crime clichés. Instead, he's poured them all into director Michael Corrente's anemic urban drama.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Flanders is, dontcha know, a state of mind, and Dumont is plain out of his.
  4. Beyond his technical clumsiness, Caleo seems convinced that real men exert power by being A-type jerks and all women are sluts. If nothing else, this film serves as a troubling psychological profile of a filmmaker who feels scornfully cynical toward nothing in particular.
  5. Hal Hartley fans, Flirt may be too slight and schematic. [13 Aug 1996]
    • Village Voice
    • 62 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Furiously intent on celebrating male love, Gibson and company try to refuse the erotics of friendship and miserably, wonderously fail. [[31 Aug 1993]
    • Village Voice
  6. Andrei Zagdansky's tedious time capsule of the event makes peculiar assumptions about audience familiarity with Ukrainian politics beyond what trickled into the headlines, blowing past potentially fascinating footnotes and story threads for 72 minutes of pure B-roll.
  7. Bloody disappointing.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Short of pulling a Zach Braff, there's one sure way to get known as a screenwriter: Put your actual name in the title of the script.
  8. The movie lacks any sense of subcultural specificity, though it has a superabundant country music score. [22 Apr 1997]
    • Village Voice
    • 46 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Eli Roth punks capitalism all the way to the bank with cheap tricks and bankrupt imagination.
  9. The best one can say for Christopher Hampton's dispirited adaptation of Joseph Conrad's The Secret Agent is that this weirdly sentimental movie might direct new attention to Conrad's corrosive novela satire. [12 Nov 1996]
    • Village Voice
    • 55 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    You can't see the forest for the twee in writer-director Taika Waititi's thicket of cutesy conceits, from the stunted supporting characters to the precious animated interludes.
  10. Gaglia's torture re-creations become rote quickly, and his cross-processed, color-tinted, randomly inserted, over-zoomed Film School 101 indulgences need their meds adjusted.
  11. Dreadful excuse for an unromantic comedy.
  12. With its broad, toothless humor and ham-fisted fits of melodrama, this sitcom-grade embarrassment aims to dethrone "Muriel's Wedding" as the quirky Aussie feel-gooder of all time, except it hurts too much to watch.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Director Chalerm Wongpim's skull-buster makes up in wild-eyed insanity (and excessive, arbitrary slow motion) what it lacks in acting, pacing, and coherence.
    • 21 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    In the end, the most offensive part of Bratz isn't its stereotypes or brand expansion; it's the sorry state of Jon Voight's career.
  13. Focusing almost solely on Lavoe's addictions (drugs and women, ho and hum), El Cantante is a garish, dispiriting bit of work--a mountain of biopic clichés snorted through the lens of a fidgety camera that never pauses long enough for us to get to like (or even know) the man responsible for making the Nuyorican sound a mainstream American commodity in the 1970s and early '80s.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Stylish, low-budget indies thrive on redeeming the clichés of everyday life. But that takes smart writing and sharp humor, of which Laura Smiles has none.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    The rush into gunfights and car chases pushes the text in all the wrong directions. As written, the 400-year-old words are still fresher than anything ripped from “Miami Vice.”
  14. "Inland Empire's" Justin Theroux pops his directorial cherry with this obnoxious Sundance throwaway, a by-the-numbers romantic comedy that mistakenly believes it's either too quirky or too irreverent to be a by-the-numbers romantic comedy.

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