Village Voice's Scores

For 10,215 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 39% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 57% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 6.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 56
Highest review score: 100 The Wind Will Carry Us
Lowest review score: 0 Seven Pounds
Score distribution:
10215 movie reviews
  1. Traffic is not just an ultra-procedural--it's the Big Picture, the Whole Enchilada, complete with a complicated war between two Mexican drug cartels.
  2. Initial strangeness inexorably gives way to rote sentimentality and mystical tenderness becomes narrative expedience.
  3. The wonderful-terrible dervish of Umbrellas reaches peak abandon, worthy of Vincente Minnelli, when Geneviève sobs out a plaint for Guy as a carnival whirls outside the shop.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It's a film of breathtaking cinematic romanticism and near-complete denial of conventional catharsis. You might wish it gave you more in terms of comfort food pleasure, but that's not Anderson's problem.
  4. It's rare that a film this outraged is also this calm.
  5. It is an essay in film form with near-universal interest and a remarkable degree of synthesis.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Facile pop psychology is the real tragedy here, a double disappointment given the film's smart take on pop culture.
  6. There isn’t a single second that doesn’t ring as achingly true.
  7. Tian's movie seems to be among the finest expressions of the Chinese new wave.
  8. In a remarkably subtle, assured debut performance, Compston evokes Billy in Loach's "Kes" and, in the heartbreaking final seaside shot, Antoine in Truffaut's "400 Blows."
  9. For all its quasi-documentary materialism, The Son is ultimately a Christian allegory of one man's inchoate desire to return good for evil. The movie requires a measure of faith, and like a job well done, it repays that trust.
  10. It's a movie for anyone who, like Miyazaki himself, can still happily commune with his inner five-year-old.
  11. The Interrupters reminds us of the powers and pleasures of well-crafted, immersive nonfiction filmmaking.
  12. Ernest & Celestine -- a contender for this year's best animated film Oscar -- is pure delight.
  13. For the vast majority of its running time, The Big Sick astutely pulls you between the twin poles of agony and glee.
  14. Bland and nasty, American Beauty has the slightly stale feel of a family sitcom conceived under the spell of "Married . . . With Children."
  15. There's never enough information.
  16. Everything is edged with desperation. However arduous Last Train Home may have been to shoot, it was infinitely more arduous to live.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The result is an intellectual history of Warhol, bucking the trend toward the star-studded VH1-ization of biodocs and constructed with a mission to dispel the artist's own self-created image as high-fashion hobnobber in favor of a more profound depiction. Burns argues for a cogitating, agitating Warhol: deep thinker, cultural barometer, and world changer.
  17. In trying through incessant narration to make a six-year-old a prolix sage, Zeitlin can't avoid falling into sticky sentimentality.
  18. Flight of the Red Balloon is in a class by itself. In its unexpected rhythms and visual surprises, its structural innovations and experimental perfs, its creative misunderstandings and its outré syntheses, this is a movie of genius.
  19. The film's ephemeral, semi-evasive lyricism ultimately works as a modest frame for Bardem's tender, deft portrait, which is in turn suitably expansive and rooted in the most concrete details -- Arenas's pride and anger, his unsentimental wit and defiant vitality.
  20. The new film is more informational than resonant. But you can still sense a vacuum, a rat pit of stories waiting to be unearthed. The dark something that triggered the whole ordeal in West Memphis is still out there.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Bravura doesn't begin to describe Greengrass's skill in mounting these complex sequences...This is, simply put, some of the most accomplished filmmaking being done anywhere for any purpose.
  21. Watching The Salesman, I can’t help but feel that this is the first time Farhadi’s mastery of the particular is undercut by the artificiality with which he’s treated the general. He remains one of the world’s foremost filmmakers, but this time around, his expertise and artistry are undone by phoniness.
  22. Seems like a TV movie. A well-written, sympathetically acted TV movie, to be sure, but so timid and clumsy in its deployment of picture, sound, and editing that you have to wonder if executive producer Martin Scorsese bothered to give notes.
  23. Suffers from over-explanation. The movie maintains tremendous momentum through the Szpilman family's deportation. The second half is another story.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Reviewed by
      Ed Park
    A horror story, told with Dickensian compassion, permeating outrage, and little hope.
  24. City of Life and Death is far more convincing as a spectacle of mass atrocity than a drama of individual conscience.
  25. The picture is beautifully rendered in pencils and watercolors, with some CG, giving it an appropriately timeless storybook look, even though it's set in a mostly modern world of buses and 3-D glasses.

Top Trailers