Wall of Sound's Scores

  • Music
For 232 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 68% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 29% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.4 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 73
Highest review score: 92 Thirteen Tales From Urban Bohemia
Lowest review score: 20 When It All Goes South
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 2 out of 232
232 music reviews
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    This is an album about textures, grooves, and sounds, but it's not really about songs. Once one is done decoding its structure, Look Into the Eyeball is an elegant but empty building.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The results are not bad -- nor are they dynamic. It's shiny and it shimmers, but there's no fizz, no explosion.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The Donnas do what they do just fine, but, four albums into their career, you can't help but want to see a little bit of growth in place of arrested development.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Osmond could teach today's teen idols a thing or two about singing. His pure, clear tenor voice still shines as bright as his trademark smile. But This Is the Moment is mostly meant for adult easy listening pleasure, and it's not a stretch to say that it mostly succeeds on that level.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 59 Critic Score
    With its grove of synthesizers, sequencers, and sonically treated vocals, it's music without pulp -- or a great deal of heart.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 59 Critic Score
    The 10-song album... hits and misses in equal quantities, though even at its worst moments, there's at least a germ of a good idea that simply wasn't realized -- or, in the case of some of the album's longer tracks, was overdone.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 58 Critic Score
    Too often Coxon's sketches-in-song come off as coy experiments -- fascinating to himself, perhaps, but holding little interest for those of us outside the lab.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 58 Critic Score
    An album awash in old new wave sonics, borrowed Ziggy-isms, and facile science fiction claptrap. As you'd expect with an album called Vapor Transmission, it suffers from quite a bit of gas.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 58 Critic Score
    Like so many of Master P's own productions, the music here stems almost completely from synthesizers, a fact that diminishes the potency of the grooves on My World, My Way. With so many of the right elements in place on tracks like "Beef" and "Uh Ha," it's a shame to hear cheesy synth lines where a shattering bass should have been.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 58 Critic Score
    Not only do many of the tunes have a similar feel, but Monahan, whose dusty vocals put the band on the map with the hit single "Meet Virginia" in 1999, is regularly drowned out by the soaring guitars and effects.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 57 Critic Score
    But other selections feel more like skeletal sketches than finished songs, composed of interesting components but short on fully developed ideas and momentum. Great stuff for background noise at a party, or in a TV commercia, but not necessarily compelling headphone fare.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 57 Critic Score
    Like far too many bands whose members bring strong musical pedigrees to the project, Unified Theory's sum is less than its parts -- despite, or perhaps because of, an abundance of adventurous spirit and experimental zeal.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 55 Critic Score
    Uncompromising and wildly unpredictable, but only intermittently entertaining.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 55 Critic Score
    Bereft of the spectacle that is Pink Floyd these days, it's hard to work up much enthusiasm for still another round of new versions of old classics.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 54 Critic Score
    Well, if nothing else, the search for the year's dumbest album title is over. And in some respects, the search for the year's dumbest album, too. True, Limp Bizkit's third release is filled with thrashworthy hooks, hardcore beats, and plenty of blind rage, but frontman Fred Durst is so inarticulate about exactly what is pissing him off that it's tough to take him seriously.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 54 Critic Score
    Scottish pop whizzes Belle and Sebastian have finally found a way to rid themselves of their onerous rep as critics' darlings: They've made an album that isn't very good.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 53 Critic Score
    With the exception of 1999's By Your Side, which showed flashes of the band's original brilliance, in recent years the songwriting of brothers Chris and Rich Robinson has deteriorated into a muddled mess of hard rock cliches. Lions is the low point of that decline.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 53 Critic Score
    Occasionally, it all works, coalescing into something with passion and imagination... In other spots, however, Frusciante's amateur (and sometimes listless) singing proves to be a major letdown, even with souped-up reverbs and megaphonic EQ-ing.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 52 Critic Score
    Too much of Discovery is relatively run-of-the-mill, lacking the pinpoint punchiness of the pair's debut.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 52 Critic Score
    This is as base as it gets, friends, a frantic, frenetic, and unapologetically adolescent orgy of sexual and scatological tomfoolery.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 52 Critic Score
    The lack of quality material here isn't the only problem with Revelation; the entire production lags as well.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    She's giving us déjà vu all over and over and over again by basically sticking to the same set of sonic templates throughout the 15-track album, never making much effort to shift up the tempos, melodies, and structures.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    A melange of rather unremarkable vocals; ambitious, overwrought dance-pop; and lyrics that occasionally read and sound like English as a second language.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Divorced from the event's theatrics, this 2-CD set is immensely unsatisfying.... it's as if the life has been choreographed out of the performances.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 49 Critic Score
    Multitracked to death, Until the End of Time lacks the intensity that made the original Makaveli's Don Killuminati: The Seven Day Theory so brash and exciting.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 49 Critic Score
    Ultimately, 999 Levels of Undo is a fascinating study of a visionary musician -- unfortunately, it's not an especially compelling listen.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 45 Critic Score
    An unseemly, almost unnecessary foray into heavy metal and hard rock, especially in light of her success on the acoustic side.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 45 Critic Score
    An album of bland and relatively anonymous adult pop that rarely gets racier than offering to "keep you up all night" and "make you holler."
    • 61 Metascore
    • 42 Critic Score
    Pitching in on Road Rock are such longstanding Young cohorts as Spooner Oldham (keyboards), Jim Keltner (drums), and Ben Keith (guitars), but such is the CD's murky sound that the contributions of all are rendered a bit flat. Moreover, although the collection clocks in at 65 minutes, the performance feels truncated and lacks thematic unity.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 41 Critic Score
    What is meant to sound languid and trippy instead comes across as overwrought and pretentious?