Wall Street Journal's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 2,139 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 41% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 57% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 59
Highest review score: 100 The Social Network
Lowest review score: 0 How Do You Know
Score distribution:
2,139 movie reviews
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The thriller aspect of this work, happily, doesn't overshadow its real beauty -- its stark portrayal of the nightmare despair of aliens, hunted, on edge, prepared to risk all for a new start.
    • Wall Street Journal
  1. Long and winding though it may be, Road to Perdition gets to places that are well worth the trip.
    • Wall Street Journal
  2. A fine, heartfelt film, sometimes harrowing in its violence but blessedly free of pretension or bombast, even though it aspires to -- and achieves -- the stature of a classic Western.
    • Wall Street Journal
  3. Straightforward in form but surprisingly intricate.
    • Wall Street Journal
  4. Lost in La Mancha, a documentary about a movie that never got made, is more involving -- and heartbreaking -- than many movies that do get made.
    • Wall Street Journal
  5. For the director, Mr. Leconte, and for the usually volcanic Mr. Auteuil, the quiet, cumulative power of this film is a striking departure from the dazzling energy of their previous collaboration in "Girl on the Bridge."
    • Wall Street Journal
  6. An endearing film, and a fascinating one.
    • Wall Street Journal
  7. A genuinely eccentric comedy that explodes with funny ideas and expresses most of them in wildly original animation.
    • Wall Street Journal
  8. Spellbinding on its own terms, a modernist fable with a madly romantic soul.
    • Wall Street Journal
  9. Readily accessible, slyly subversive and perfectly delightful film.
    • Wall Street Journal
  10. A surprising, entirely beguiling little film.
    • Wall Street Journal
  11. Lee's journey of the body and soul is something else. Maggie Gyllenhaal makes it strangely touching, a revelation.
    • Wall Street Journal
  12. Mr. Shyamalan is a new national treasure, as attuned to our sensibilities and everyday life as Steven Spielberg.
    • Wall Street Journal
  13. xXx
    To top it all off, no matter where you sit in the theater, no matter how far you arch back in your seat, there's no escaping the sensation that all the action on the screen is taking place about three feet from your face. I loved it.
    • Wall Street Journal
  14. Has its flaws, but it's better, as well as darker, than the first. It's also longer, by nine minutes, but hold that protest to the Kidney Foundation; the time flies, albeit in fits and starts, like players on a Quidditch field.
    • Wall Street Journal
  15. Mr. Pandya tells a story of conflicted assimilation that's been told before, but he and his exuberant cast invest it with fresh energy and winning humor.
  16. Fresh and flip and enjoyable, it's a sci-fi-tinged romantic comedy that I urge you to seek out.
    • Wall Street Journal
  17. Why, in our drum-thumping, ritually trumpeting time, did so little fanfare precede the opening of a movie with so much to recommend it? This is grand entertainment.
    • Wall Street Journal
  18. Training Day can be simplistic, formulaic and absurdly melodramatic -- but Mr. Washington is flat-out great.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 59 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Thanks to Ms. Witherspoon's artful portrayal of a winning, if beachless, Gidget, I found Legally Blonde very enjoyable.
    • Wall Street Journal
  19. Appeal lies on the bright, shiny surface of its ostensibly simple plot, and in its rat-a-tat-tat language, which often sounds like Mamet-visits-Spyne.
    • Wall Street Journal
  20. It's very funny, terrifically lively and, considering how awful it might have been, surprisingly tender in its portrait of a young guy who learns sensitivity the hard way.
    • Wall Street Journal
  21. A harrowing lesson in unintended -- and intended -- consequences.
    • Wall Street Journal
  22. The outcome is distinctive and entertaining. There's no way you'd mistake this for James Bond, and no reason you would want to.
    • Wall Street Journal
  23. The best car commercial ever, an absolute triumph of product placement, and great fun as a movie in the bargain.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's a simple story, exposing the beauty that lives inside difficult relationships, and it leaves you feeling quietly exalted without ever seeming to try.
    • Wall Street Journal
  24. More to the point of this marvelous film, who knew there were kids as heroic, in their various ways, as these valiant super-spellers?
    • Wall Street Journal
  25. Serendipity is "Sliding Doors" with no alternate versions; it's willed enchantment all the way.
    • Wall Street Journal
  26. Unexpectedly thoughtful, as well as touching.
    • Wall Street Journal
  27. Every action adventure needs a memorable villain, but no movie needs the strident intensity of Mr. Dafoe, who either has no interest in, or no grasp of, the sort of charmingly malign wit that Gene Hackman brought to "Superman," or Jack Nicholson to "Batman."
    • Wall Street Journal
  28. Difficult too, and certainly problematic, but it's sometimes quite wonderful. Do see it if you're curious about one-of-a-kind films, and if you care about the ever-evolving career of one of our most gifted filmmakers.
    • Wall Street Journal
  29. An exciting caper, though sometimes a trying one, with great dollops of self-parodying dialogue that will test your loyalty to Mr. Mamet's way with words.
    • Wall Street Journal
  30. Adaptation, like "Being John Malkovich" before it, is far from a well-made film, even on its own flaky terms. But it's a brave, sometimes brilliant one, with a phantasmagoric ending, full of love and hope, that defeats prose description. Never was an adaptation more original.
    • Wall Street Journal
  31. Breathes new life into a familiar story: coming of age in high school.
    • Wall Street Journal
  32. An accomplished and enjoyable Spanish-language debut feature by Fabían Bielinsky.
    • Wall Street Journal
  33. I'm still smiling as I recall Jess, the soccer star-to-be, standing behind her straitlaced mother in the kitchen and casually bouncing a head of lettuce on her knee.
    • Wall Street Journal
  34. Throbs with an ambition that sends it soaring, then brings it down.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 30 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Succeeds the same way the original comic books did: by making the conflicts and dilemmas basic enough for a five-year-old, while giving the heroes and villains glamorous outfits and layers of complexity, to thicken the broth.
    • Wall Street Journal
  35. For the most part, though, Ms. Moncrieff has given us a portrait of a young woman with a luminous soul.
    • Wall Street Journal
  36. Provides a reminder of the power of unadorned drama and language -- whole torrents of eloquent words -- in the service of a nifty idea.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 51 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The movie is, at times, funny enough to make you cry, and, when it's not, it moves nicely as a parody.
    • Wall Street Journal
  37. You can't take your eyes off Ms. Kidman; she has never played a role with more focused energy.
    • Wall Street Journal
  38. I laughed myself silly through most of A Mighty Wind, and was pleasantly surprised when it took a turn toward genuine feeling near the end.
    • Wall Street Journal
  39. Mr. Franklin has always been easy with quicksilver moods -- and Mr. Washington is terrifically appealing as a fool for love who loses his cool as he learns about fear.
    • Wall Street Journal
  40. A droll and affecting debut feature by Tom McCarthy.
    • Wall Street Journal
  41. None of this would work, of course, without stylish performances in the leads and Mr. Clooney and Ms. Zeta-Jones do themselves and their dubious characters proud.
    • Wall Street Journal
  42. A smart, suspenseful drama, starring Hayden Christensen, that honors its own factual roots as no movie about journalists has done since "All the President's Men."
    • Wall Street Journal
  43. The film grows on you too, a later-stage version of "The Big Chill" that starts schematically and ends as a stirring celebration.
    • Wall Street Journal
  44. A single seeing isn't enough to take in the eccentric marvels of The Triplets of Belleville, an animated feature by Sylvain Chomet that creates a visual language all its own.
    • Wall Street Journal
  45. Diane Keaton has the crucial role, and she makes the most of it.
    • Wall Street Journal
  46. Haunting, troubling documentary.
    • Wall Street Journal
  47. Clearly Mr. Altman was enthralled by the company's work process, an alchemy through which sweat and muscularity on the rehearsal-room floor become exquisite abstractions on stage. His pleasure is infectious.
    • Wall Street Journal
  48. Recreates the Taliban era with chilling details and startling beauty, and follows its terrified heroine on a journey that no child should have to take.
    • Wall Street Journal
  49. A singularly strange and affecting comedy.
    • Wall Street Journal
  50. Some comedies make you laugh out loud. This one makes you smile inwardly, but often.
    • Wall Street Journal
  51. Given the white-on-white color scheme, I didn't expect so many shades of feeling.
    • Wall Street Journal
  52. Before and after plot mechanics, a drama of family tension and warmth.
  53. News management is the main issue. Control Room shows how coverage is tailored to fit the audience, both by al-Jazeera and its Western counterparts.
    • Wall Street Journal
  54. It's a great accomplishment and, at a time when satire is in short supply, a terrific surprise.
    • Wall Street Journal
  55. More than a deadpan comedy about oddball losers. This dork has his day, and this story has its touching subtext -- growing pains relieved by unlikely hope.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Set ablaze by a startling performance by Laura Dern, it's a stark, often disturbing look at the ramifications of betrayal.
    • Wall Street Journal
  56. A sports movie with a quick wit, uncommon grace and a romantic soul.
    • Wall Street Journal
  57. A convincing, entertaining portrait of the revolutionist as a young man.
    • Wall Street Journal
  58. His story is instructive, as well as chilling and occasionally hilarious -- a brief, probably foredoomed career during which a would-be Orson Welles, playing shamelessly to the camera, draws from a bottomless cesspool of hubris, bile and rage.
    • Wall Street Journal
  59. Why, then, should we be eager to see a story of such incomplete inspiration? Because it's thrilling, and stirring. And because it is truth.
    • Wall Street Journal
  60. Has its share of contrivances, some more successful than others, but center stage is occupied by truth, and austere beauty.
    • Wall Street Journal
  61. Hotel Rwanda isn't impersonal, even though it only hints at the story's full horror. It's stunning.
    • Wall Street Journal
  62. That Mr. Rohmer is an octogenarian just beginning to play with digital technology makes the venture even more intriguing.
    • Wall Street Journal
  63. Mr. Stettner has a serious subject here -- how the hurts that women suffer at the hands of men can be internalized more deeply than the victims know -- and his film is graced with a stunning performance by Ms. Channing.
    • Wall Street Journal
  64. Tender, funny and smart, Machuca is that rare discovery, an incisive political parable that also succeeds as a drama of sharply drawn individuals.
    • Wall Street Journal
  65. Fatih Akin is a filmmaker to be reckoned with. His characters grow and change in a stunning film that pulses with life.
  66. Strong stuff, and all the stronger for having taken itself so comically.
    • Wall Street Journal
  67. Intriguing and affecting documentary.
    • Wall Street Journal
  68. Immensely likable, and allows Mr. Smith to fulfill his manifest destiny -- as an urbane comedian who is also, shades of Cary Grant, a romantic hero.
    • Wall Street Journal
  69. A cry of anguish for the youngest victims of every war.
    • Wall Street Journal
  70. The movie's sense of place is hypnotic, but there's more to it than gorgeous images -- Campbell Scott's astute direction; Joan Allen's beautifully laconic performance; a sense of lively, if occasionally pretentious, inquiry into the wellsprings of art.
    • Wall Street Journal
  71. Full of entertaining vignettes that eventually make a happy mockery, as they're meant to do, of the tragedy vs. comedy dialectic.
    • Wall Street Journal
  72. His film is not for the weak of stomach or heart, but it's a stunner all the same.
    • Wall Street Journal
  73. Make what you will of the story and its symbolism, but Mr. Antal has made a remarkable feature debut with this visionary film, chockablock with memorable images.
    • Wall Street Journal
  74. The latest in a series of stiletto-sharp social comedies by the French filmmakers Jean-Pierre Bacri and Agnès Jaoui.
    • Wall Street Journal
  75. Gives us the same sort of perverse pleasure that's been a staple of "60 Minutes" over the years -- watching world-class crooks tell world-class lies.
    • Wall Street Journal
  76. Don't miss an opportunity to see Mad Hot Ballroom, though. It will sweep you off your feet.
    • Wall Street Journal
  77. Ron Howard's Depression-era movie also works from the inside out, building a classic underdog drama from depth of character, rich texture, vivid detail and stirring performances.
    • Wall Street Journal
  78. The distinction of this lovely, if slightly tentative, debut feature is its willingness to set forth mysteries of the human heart without solving them; everyone's fate stays unsealed.
    • Wall Street Journal
  79. Watch them march to the very extremes of extremis, though, and it's easy to feel awe.
    • Wall Street Journal
  80. Head, shoulders, funny bone and brain above the competition. It's the best comedy I've seen this year.
    • Wall Street Journal
  81. I found Hustle & Flow hard to get into at first, if only for its dialogue. But DJay's turf turns out to be everyone's turf -- a jagged landscape of hopes, disappointments, folly and fulfillment.
    • Wall Street Journal
  82. Uncommonly smart and interesting.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Jarmusch's uncharacteristically mainstream -- wonderful -- road trip movie.
    • Wall Street Journal
  83. Duma is not a masterpiece, but its deficits recede into insignificance once you open yourself to the movie's mystery and visual splendor.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 51 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A wildly wondrous reinvention of the story of the chroniclers of dark, occasionally horrific, child-pleasing fairy tales.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This award-winning picture from Belgium is the kind Hollywood seems no longer interested in making: a sophisticated drama that presumes a level of insight and maturity in an audience that doesn't need winks and arrows to understand what's going on.
    • Wall Street Journal
  84. The celebrated percussionist Evelyn Glennie is the subject of a wonderful documentary called Touch the Sound, although calling her a percussionist is like calling Brancusi a demolitionist.
    • Wall Street Journal
  85. The intricacies here are moral and ethical, and they're fascinating.
    • Wall Street Journal
  86. Many movies these days are too long; this one, at 90 minutes, feels too short. That's because its purpose is so sharply defined: a tight close-up, in black and white, of a single, seminal moment -- a black and white moment -- in American history, and American journalism.
    • Wall Street Journal
  87. The illusion is seamless and the pleasure is boundless.
    • Wall Street Journal
  88. Manipulative, but confidently so, and improbably but consistently affecting.
    • Wall Street Journal
  89. This is a special film whose delicate tone ranges from tender to astringent, with occasional side trips into sweet.
    • Wall Street Journal
  90. Amazingly and incessantly funny, a free-form riff on Hollywood shenanigans, the film noir genre and film in general.
    • Wall Street Journal
  91. Still, the cynosure of all eyes is honest, articulate Elizabeth, her own woman in an era when women belonged to men, and at the same time full of love. Lizzie is the best, and Keira Knightley does right by her.
    • Wall Street Journal

Top Trailers