Wall Street Journal's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 2,149 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 41% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 57% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 59
Highest review score: 100 Happy-Go-Lucky
Lowest review score: 0 The Last Airbender
Score distribution:
2,149 movie reviews
  1. This film is extraordinary on several counts: its knowledge of an arcane trade (Mr. Cohen ran his family's diamond business after his father died); its fondness for telling good life stories; and, above all, its superb starring performance.
    • Wall Street Journal
  2. Mr. Quaid has long been a reliably likable actor, but this time he pitches a perfect performance -- no frills, no tricks, not a single false note -- in a film that's true to its stirring subject, and to the sweetest traditions of the game.
    • Wall Street Journal
  3. Directed with such a confident, delicate touch. Nothing is insisted on, yet whole lives are discovered and revealed in vignettes that seem as spontaneous as a laugh or a gasp.
    • Wall Street Journal
  4. A thriller with a quietly sensational performance by Tilda Swinton.
    • Wall Street Journal
  5. A huge delight.
  6. A handsome, absorbing debut feature by the fiction and television writer Henry Bromell.
    • Wall Street Journal
  7. A magnificent concert film of Latino jazz.
    • Wall Street Journal
  8. It's astonishing, and moving.
    • Wall Street Journal
  9. A thrillingly, thoroughly wonderful film.
    • Wall Street Journal
  10. A stunning drama that's distinguished by a magnificent performance; the most powerful scenes are those that play, as recollection or confession, on Lena Endre's lovely face.
    • Wall Street Journal
  11. The team's (Merchant-Ivory) best adaptation yet of a Henry James novel.
    • Wall Street Journal
  12. Proves to be a remarkably lean and incisive film about the fateful power of sexuality.
    • Wall Street Journal
  13. A stunning drama about the desperate state of women in Iran.
    • Wall Street Journal
  14. Vincent is played masterfully by Aurelien Recoing, who gives him a sort of as-if anomie; this haunted hero is so detached that he may not realize he has no real life to be detached from.
    • Wall Street Journal
  15. See The Magdalene Sisters for its own sake; the performances alone are inspirational. But see it too as an example of how powerful a feature film still can be in the hands of an impassioned filmmaker.
    • Wall Street Journal
  16. The good news about Claude Lelouch's And Now Ladies and Gentlemen -- there's no bad news -- is that the man who made the sublimely superficial "A Man and a Woman" almost four decades ago has grown in wisdom and artistry, but hasn't lost his love of glossy surfaces.
    • Wall Street Journal
  17. This portrait of a failing marriage is one of the summer's great discoveries, and a marvel of mercurial intimacy.
    • Wall Street Journal
  18. Like his (David Gordon Green's) debut feature of three years ago, the exquisite "George Washington," this new one has my heart, and I think it will have yours.
  19. Who doesn't need what this movie has to give?
    • Wall Street Journal
  20. A marvelous story.
    • Wall Street Journal
  21. A smart, funny and strangely touching film.
    • Wall Street Journal
  22. I loved this movie, and I wish it could be seen by all those kids who turn out every weekend for shoddy studio comedies that show them who they'd like to be. Raising Victor Vargas shows young lovers as they are.
    • Wall Street Journal
  23. A deeply serious and seriously hilarious fable of the lunacy of war.
    • Wall Street Journal
  24. Whatever thematic clarity the added footage may confer is prosaic or didactic and intrusive; this stuff hit the cutting-room floor the first time around for good reason.
    • Wall Street Journal
  25. Terrifically funny and remarkably wise, a comedy that speaks volumes, without a polemical word, about the tension between rigid politics of any stripe and the imperatives of life and love.
    • Wall Street Journal
  26. Meticulously crafted and beautifully performed.
    • Wall Street Journal
  27. This is a woman's work in the best sense -- empathetic, inferentially erotic and delicately intuitive, as well as fiercely intelligent.
    • Wall Street Journal
  28. (Morton's) character here is emotionally mute -- though Morvern speaks, she can't or won't reveal what's in her heart -- and her performance is brilliant from start to finish.
    • Wall Street Journal
  29. Mr. Tykwer's hands the movie changes almost magically from drama to chase to romance. As it does so its moral weight lessens; by the end there is less than what first engaged the mind. What meets the eye, though, is unforgettable.
    • Wall Street Journal
  30. Pulls you in with smooth assurance, then holds you hostage to extremely creepy developments in the most awesome haunted house since "The Shining."
    • Wall Street Journal

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