Wall Street Journal's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 2,143 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 41% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 57% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 59
Highest review score: 100 The Departed
Lowest review score: 0 Untraceable
Score distribution:
2,143 movie reviews
  1. An abomination, impure and simple.
    • Wall Street Journal
  2. Nothing's alive in this trash-heap travesty of warm-weather entertainment, despite the frenetic pace.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 9 Metascore
    • 0 Critic Score
    Unspeakably ghastly sequel to the merely ghastly original.
    • Wall Street Journal
  3. Domino is a new definition of a snuff movie. It snuffs out every vestige of feeling.
    • Wall Street Journal
  4. Hate is too strong an emotion to spend on such a clumsy, bloodless broadside against human foibles in general and American follies in particular.
    • Wall Street Journal
  5. This film bespeaks a truly startling mistrust of the movie audience, and, what's more, a disrespect for the feature film medium. Yes, of course it was conceived as an unpretentious entertainment pitched mainly to girls and young women. Yet that doesn't explain the nightmarish quality of the finished product.
    • Wall Street Journal
  6. Wild Hogs, which includes a cameo by a live revenant from "Easy Rider," gives a bad name to carpe diem, but could have been worse; the trip might have started from Bangor.
    • Wall Street Journal
  7. Pay real money to see this feeble fiasco only if you're in the mood for "Groundhog Day" without the laughs.
    • Wall Street Journal
  8. Life is full of choices, and Halle Berry has made another bad one with Perfect Stranger, a perfectly off-putting thriller.
    • Wall Street Journal
  9. Certain words should be reserved for special occasions. "Abysmal" is one of them, and Georgia Rule is as special as such occasions get.
  10. I found it insufferably fatuous and damned near interminable. [26 Jun 1998]
    • Wall Street Journal
  11. It's all played for giggles, this grim anti-humanism. [21 May 1992]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 12 Metascore
    • 0 Critic Score
    This one could bring back Prohibition.
    • Wall Street Journal
  12. Metroland, which is adapted from a novel by Julian Barnes, is an oddly unpleasant variation on the theme of "The Way We Were." [09 Apr 1999]
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 45 Metascore
    • 0 Critic Score
    Nobody fares well in this movie about sibling rivalry, doomed love and fringed suede. [05 Jan 1995]
    • Wall Street Journal
  13. The Americans are portrayed with varying degrees of loathsomeness, but there's not much variety in the film. It's all an awful aberration.
  14. This joyless thriller runs the gamut from unconscionable through unwatchable to unendurable.
  15. Jumper, based on the novel by Steven Gould, re-defines -- downward -- the notion of dreadful. It does so by dispensing with everything a movie needs for a shot at being merely awful. Dramatic development? None. Entertaining dialogue? Ditto. Internal logic? Puhleez. Intriguing characters? No characters, thus no intrigue. Interesting performances? Essentially none, though with an asterisk.
  16. This toxic admixture of computer-generated frenzy and live-action torpor succeeds in being, almost simultaneously, genuinely painful -- the esthetic equivalent of needles in eyeballs -- and weirdly benumbing, like eye candy laced with lidocaine.
  17. The road taken by The Love Guru could hardly be lower, and leads nowhere.
  18. Any notions of demolishing black stereotypes -- and what else could have possessed Mr. Smith to do this? -- are dashed by the coarseness of it all, and by the narrative incoherence; a surprising plot twist turns a sloppy action-comedy into a totally different movie, and an even worse one.
  19. There's a good subject for satire here, the extended adolescence of American kids. But satire presupposes maturity, or at least some perspective. The movie's calculation is that its subjects and audience share the same point of view. The results are truly ghastly.
  20. As a PG-rated film opening on Christmas Day under the Disney banner, Bedtime Stories would seem to promise fairly wholesome family entertainment. What it delivers is the glitzy allure of a hotel setting, smarmy double entendres, Ferrari lust, Beverly Hills bling and pneumatic babes -- one of the characters is a surrogate Paris Hilton.
  21. I have no idea how such shameless prattle found its way to the screen.
  22. Jim Jarmusch's Dada meander, shot by Christopher Doyle, is empty and excruciating -- that's really all you need to know.
  23. This dramatically, thematically and artistically bankrupt comic fantasy cost something in the neighborhood of $100 million to make and isn't worth the celluloid it's printed on.
  24. Basically a soulless slasher flick, and one that demeans its gifted performers.
  25. The filmmaker has delivered yet another iteration of what has become a classic M. Night Shyamalan film, only much bigger than before, and, as a consequence, mind-bendingly turgid.
  26. I can't say anything nice about Flipped, a painfully clumsy adaptation of a tween novel by Wendelin Van Draanen.
  27. No need to belabor the awfulness of this film, a romantic comedy devoid of romance - instead of chemistry there's the flow of reverse magnetism - and lacking in comic timing, let alone comic content.

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