Wall Street Journal's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 2,266 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 42% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 56% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 59
Highest review score: 100 Man on the Train
Lowest review score: 0 Perfect Stranger
Score distribution:
2,266 movie reviews
  1. The movie on the whole is joyless. Whatever Works doesn’t.
  2. Before Firewall crumbles into foolishness, Harrison Ford and Paul Bettany make an oft-recycled plot look like a stylish model that just rolled out of a showroom.
    • Wall Street Journal
  3. Mr. Brooks manages to be deeply loathsome -- no small feat for a film that's shallowly amateurish.
  4. J.Lo should sue her handlers for damages.
    • Wall Street Journal
  5. Mark Andrus's script is built on soggy sandstone, and Irwin Winkler's bulldozer direction keeps unearthing toxic epiphanies. That's not to say the movie isn't occasionally moving, as well as exasperating.
    • Wall Street Journal
  6. Mr. Samuell's stylistic revelries are meant as comments on the conventions and excesses of movie romance, but his approach is glib and self-congratulatory. No feelings dwell beneath the layers upon layers of faux-naïve artifice. I dare you to sit through this movie and not wish you were somewhere else.
    • Wall Street Journal
  7. The movie stands as a genuine offense against the venerable and indispensable institution of satire.
    • Wall Street Journal
  8. The IMAX print I saw was so murky as to make you give thanks for the few scenes shot in simple sunlight, the 3-D wasn't worth the bother, and never before have I wanted to chloroform an entire orchestra.
  9. An abomination.
    • Wall Street Journal
  10. Ms. Blanchett can do no wrong, and does none here, though the movie around her, a popcorn-worthy sequel to the 1998 "Elizabeth," often lapses into opacity or grandiosity.
  11. The whole dumb movie is a baloney cake, but the enticing icing on it is Reese Witherspoon, who manages to have a few moments of spontaneous fun in this half-baked store-bought comedy.
    • Wall Street Journal
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    It's beautiful to watch, but it doesn't cover very much ground. Sumptuously appointed, meticulously detailed, the film sallies forth - and sags. [06 Apr 1995]
    • Wall Street Journal
  12. At a time when so many movies look alike, and studio productions sometimes look aggressively ugly, here's a quirky vision at the intersection of sci-fi and romance. Upside Down can be beguiling if you're willing to invert disbelief.
  13. Less magical is the blind adherence to formula evident in most of Taken 2. As they might say in the advertising department, it's an adrenaline-fueled thrill ride. But it could have been much more.
  14. With a refreshing absence of earnestness, the movie mainly spins out many variations on a theme: Easy Street begins and ends on Capitol Hill. [03 Dec 1992]
    • Wall Street Journal
  15. Its tone is unquenchably pretentious, and its scale is overblown.
    • Wall Street Journal
  16. A saga of static set pieces and strenuously clever notions, this is a fiasco of a film if ever there was one.
    • Wall Street Journal
  17. The situation in The Situation is grimly photogenic, yet persistently opaque.
    • Wall Street Journal
  18. The medium really is the message here, and it steals what there is of the show.
    • Wall Street Journal
  19. Starts out stylishly, and promisingly, but then coarsens into a silly parody of film noir.
    • Wall Street Journal
  20. This is little more than a big-budget sitcom, with a guest appearance by Mike Ditka, who plays an unfunny version of himself as Phil's assistant coach.
    • Wall Street Journal
  21. Rather than a character rooted in some sort of reality-social, satirical, psychological, take your pick-Hesher is an abstract notion animated by false energy.
  22. Calling Joe Carnahan's movie heartless implies that this auteur of affectless anarchy might have meant to invest it with detectable human feelings, and failed. Better to call it heart-free.
    • Wall Street Journal
  23. Against heavy odds, Mean Machine adds darker flavors to the plot without curdling it. Beneath the comic craziness is real craziness, and desperation. These goal-kicking, bone-crunching cons are both actors in and prisoners of their own horror show.
    • Wall Street Journal
  24. Country Strong comes to spontaneous life from time to time, despite maudlin devices and manipulative set pieces.
  25. Looks like the deformed spawn of a development process gone awry.
    • Wall Street Journal
  26. The movie isn't all bad, and it's sure to succeed with its target audience.
    • Wall Street Journal
  27. It's not a good sign when a movie is called The Break-Up and you can't wait for the couple to split so they'll get some relief from one another, and give the audience some relief from them.
    • Wall Street Journal
  28. For all its seriousness, though, Levity struck me as pretentious and intractably lifeless.
    • Wall Street Journal
  29. Predictably dumber than its predecessors, though that shouldn't get in the way of its profitability.
    • Wall Street Journal

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