Wall Street Journal's Scores

For 447 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 64% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 33% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 4.3 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 69
Highest review score: 100 Downton Abbey: Season 2
Lowest review score: 10 The Millers: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 321
  2. Negative: 0 out of 321
321 tv reviews
  1. In a film directed by Ryan Murphy and with strong performances, including those by Mr. Ruffalo, Ms. Roberts, Matt Bomer, Jim Parsons and Alfred Molina, Mr. Mantello's anguished lament ["...can't you see how important it is for us to love openly...without guilt?"] may be the most haunting.
  2. The people of Orange offer some of the best times, and company, to be found on TV.
  3. It has cinematic production values that give it the heft of a movie, and the lead characters are so natural and believable that the alien angle is less ludicrous than usual.
  4. From the evidence of the first few episodes, "Criminal Minds" may be a hit, and deservedly.
  5. Mr. Gervais has in no way lost his touch.
  6. Impressive... Ms. Mirren leaves her authoritative stamp on the role of Elizabeth.
  7. This being a made-for-television environment, no one perishes, but there are no happy endings here, either.
  8. There are precious few signs of trouble or uncertainty in the polished, instantaneously seductive finished product on display in its first episode.
  9. The standard caution is relevant -- debut episodes tend to be highly polished. All the more reason to enjoy the hilarious scenes and fine ensemble cast here.
  10. A wide-ranging work and a compelling one.
  11. The production is set among English traders in 19th-century Japan, the timeline of the action is altered, and some beloved examples of word play are no longer in the script. These are small matters, though, compared to the fresh gorgeousness on display and the elements of the story that come into focus here in new and moving ways.
  12. Despite its fantastic nature, the story is an onion with a thousand layers, each one a satisfying mystery of its own.
  13. As the denizens of K-Ville move among the ruins of the city, the real and the fake merge until you forget that this is mere entertainment. It's a new experience, and an invigorating one.
  14. Of all the new shows I've watched, it's also the one I'm most eager to see again.
  15. As charming as all that is amid the macabre, Pushing Daisies is a show that only a grown-up can fully enjoy.
  16. It's a bit old-fashioned, which in today's TV universe makes it seem light and fresh--like the entrancing Ms. Applegate herself.
  17. If Welcome to the Captain can sustain its tone of tender quirkiness, it may find an appreciate audience stretching from those who loved "Arrested Development" to fans of "My Name Is Earl."
  18. The underlying theme here, once the fantastic elements are stripped away, is loneliness. That (plus the interesting face of its star) gives New Amsterdam a true and very tender heart.
  19. It is not an exaggeration to say that the effect is of opening a treasure chest and being showered with its riches.
  20. The fantastic Ms. Ullman is as funny as ever, depicting a new slew of characters in sketches that mock the way we are.
  21. It's best to get quickly past the confused and shapeless first episode and on to the rest, where the characters become individualized.
  22. The story of rising (and falling) movie star Vince (Adrian Grenier) and his entourage of high-living pals is as amusing as ever; and as the show matures so, ever so slightly, do the characters.
  23. It's all more like a steady burn--of talent, of smart writing, of chemical reactions--and it may take a few episodes to feel the heat.
  24. There is enough lively (if sometimes explicit) dialogue and reliable sexual appeal in all this to keep intuitive male viewers interested.
  25. Four episodes of Life on Mars have by now aired, each livelier and more confident than the last and--despite its mush of a lead character--justifiably so. That's no small triumph.
  26. It is funny in the manner of "Best in Show" or "A Mighty Wind," but much more biting. Although that means there are some truly painful moments, the talent of Mr. Lilley, a brilliant mimic, is a divine salve.
  27. Ms. Jones's president is compelling--a force to contend with. Much the same can be said of the new 24 itself--a force now returned in strength and, once again, highly addictive.
  28. Everything happens quickly -- scenes, cameos, comments and quips fly by. But nothing is throwaway or stupid, and in the midst of laughter, the emotion, when it comes, feels real. That's good acting. It also happens only when writers respect their audience.
  29. The casting is effective. William Miller gives Oliver the requisite vulnerability and steeliness.
  30. Magnificent cinematography, abundant animal life and lovely music that may contain harmonies unique to Botswana--all these make The No. 1 Ladies' Detective Agency a distinctly foreign affair. In the end, though, what comes through most strongly is not what's different, but how easily we recognize it all.

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