Wall Street Journal's Scores

For 454 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 64% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 33% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 4.4 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 69
Highest review score: 100 Prohibition: Season 1
Lowest review score: 10 Category 7: The End of the World: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 327
  2. Negative: 0 out of 327
327 tv reviews
  1. Although the film ends on an odd note that seems to endorse near-subsistence farming as the only moral and sustainable form of agriculture, it makes an important record of a receding era.
  2. Most of the editors here have charm and pizazz that seem more appealing than the photographs they masterminded.
  3. It's a testament to the crackling intelligence of the script (written by Mr. Boyd) that the nature of that menace hangs elusively in the air until the end.
  4. This hour [is] packed with Mr. Brooks at his most endearing.
  5. Its smartness comes shining through despite the claptrap (none worse than the parade of sex scenes, soft-porn variety, whose noisiness is exceeded only by their unconvincingness); its story, littered with intriguingly repellent characters, like Kai Proctor (Ulrich Thomsen), local evil tycoon, grows ever more enticing.
  6. There's considerable charm in this medical-drama concoction, which comes with the usual generous supply of spectacular brain disorders nobody you know will ever get--and in Mr. Pasquale's Dr. Cole, a confident, dedicated surgeon.
  7. Sharp-tongued, ambitious, highly seductive--a TV series that has, it can be said, done the job.
  8. It's a measure of the skill brought to this script by Paul Scheuring that a first episode so awash in multiplying complications manages to maintain its coherence and even a significant measure of suspense.
  9. A tartly written number, (by Paul Feig) that is amusing and frequently hard-eyed in its look back at certain not so dear old school days. [27 Sept 1999, p.A32]
    • Wall Street Journal
  10. As painful as it is to see a fallen dog's body draped in the American flag, what Glory Dogs also does is deepen our appreciation for the servicemen who train them.
  11. While they are every bit as wild and woolly as the historical figures of Norse sagas, such is the power of Vikings that we come to know and even root for them, so enthralling are they and almost everything else here.
  12. As odd as poor Norman is, there's something about Norma that gives Bates Motel its true, and truly frightening, center. Vulnerable and malign, Ms. Farmiga pretty much nails it.
  13. A fact-based film of exceptional power.
  14. This new PBS Masterpiece series written by Andrew Davies is plenty addicting without the lords and ladies, opening a treasure box of tales about love, loss, ambition and the spirit of a new age.
  15. All are reintroduced in a premiere episode that lumbers along, overpopulated, burdened by the weight of its ambitions, flattened by misbegotten detours--but one, nevertheless, that surges to life in the end.
  16. Rectify is an ambitious and eloquent series, vivid in its portraiture of family and local citizens who don't know quite what to make of Daniel (a proclivity the film seems to share)--assurance enough of an engrossing six hours.
  17. Maron is short, funny and coherent.
  18. The unit's work was top secret, its members' experiences, recounted in this film, fascinating above all for what they tell about the determined inventiveness, the all-out ambition to try everything, characteristic of that war effort.
  19. Behind the Candelabra, a snapshot from the last decade of the pianist and showman Liberace, is sublimely entertaining.
  20. An atmospheric thriller wrapped around a nugget of social commentary.
  21. Once past an introductory flow of steamy images--plenty of stripping and unzipping, couplings in darkened rooms--it takes no time to recognize the quality in this sharply written and entertaining saga of four women destined to lead exceedingly complicated lives.
  22. The first episode of Under the Dome is so intriguing that you may be tempted to Wiki the Stephen King novel on which it's based to find out what will happen next. Don't do that.
  23. The performances by the likes of Mr. Biggs, Ms. Mulgrew and, especially, Ms. Schilling are so convincing, and the dialogue so sharp, that none of this feels like prurience for its own sake.
  24. A dark but artful and sophisticated drama.
  25. Hard as it may be to imagine, there is still drama in the subject of crime families. And National Geographic Channel's contribution, the six-part Inside the American Mob, is impressive on that score. Most of its persuasiveness derives from first-person reflections both by federal officials and by Mafios.
  26. This highly personal view of the Nixon years is, for obvious reasons, a sad and wrenching one--a film that is nonetheless filled with spirit, humor and a beautiful sense of irony.
  27. A wonderfully diverting film with Mr. David at his abrasive best.
  28. While the documentary doesn't view the day through rose-colored glasses, it lets us approach that time in a new, less painful way.
  29. A high-hearted script awash in flinty wit and two extraordinary performances.
  30. Sleepy Hollow is great fun and gorgeous to look at.... The mythology of Sleepy Hollow is richly complex.

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