Wall Street Journal's Scores

For 617 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 63% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 34% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 69
Highest review score: 100 Planet Earth II
Lowest review score: 10 Graceland: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 439
  2. Negative: 0 out of 439
439 tv reviews
  1. It contains enough legalese to make things seem plausible, not impenetrable. It breathes. It allows relationships to build, and be revealed, as the narrative progresses.
  2. It has cinematic production values that give it the heft of a movie, and the lead characters are so natural and believable that the alien angle is less ludicrous than usual.
  3. The unit's work was top secret, its members' experiences, recounted in this film, fascinating above all for what they tell about the determined inventiveness, the all-out ambition to try everything, characteristic of that war effort.
  4. There's plenty of life and overall quality to sustain this series for a long time to come.
  5. The series couldn't have arrived at a more timely moment for such subject matter, but there's no point looking for even-handedness or a lack thereof in a work that offers only--give or take a caustic political observation or two--exhilarating drama.
  6. No sooner has Upstairs veered toward farce than it redeems itself, again and again.
  7. Maron is short, funny and coherent.
  8. Whatever the complaints about the movie, it brings home, as few films on such themes ever do, the terrors of accusation and conviction.
  9. We may have seen film of migrating wildebeest and zebras on the Serengeti before. But Great Migrations looks at everything from new and spectacularly beautiful angles.
  10. There is enough lively (if sometimes explicit) dialogue and reliable sexual appeal in all this to keep intuitive male viewers interested.
  11. Given the filmmaker's unrestricted access to Mitt Romney through both presidential campaigns, Greg Whiteley's Mitt is an unsurprisingly warm portrait. Which isn't to say it isn't full of tensions, when not outright suffering, perceptible through all the upbeat chatter from the candidate and his wife, campaign advisers, the Romney sons and their wives.
  12. All good stuff, plus a brief but powerful moment at the end that will leave longtime "Morse" fans in an agony of nostalgia
  13. This being a made-for-television environment, no one perishes, but there are no happy endings here, either.
  14. Some of the life forms in Almost Human are artificial. The intelligence is genuine.
  15. TNT's cop drama Southland is like a hot date on a Saturday night. Just waiting for another episode to begin each week is a thrill, and once the show gets going the rush is like nothing else on TV.
  16. While the series is not without humor--including the occasional sexual witticism--it is never camp, a huge plus for devotees of genuine drama.
  17. Magnificent cinematography, abundant animal life and lovely music that may contain harmonies unique to Botswana--all these make The No. 1 Ladies' Detective Agency a distinctly foreign affair. In the end, though, what comes through most strongly is not what's different, but how easily we recognize it all.
  18. The real Messrs. Gervais and Merchant haven't lost their touch with self-humiliating characters.
  19. A six-part saga awash in fashionable gloom, set in the mountains of New Jersey, and much of the time a compelling one in its picture of the tensions between the Van Der Veens, members of an Indian tribe, and the blue-collar Jensens, headed by Harold (Martin Henderson), a police officer.
  20. That these actors can make us care about their characters, or at least feel their pain so acutely, is what elevates Getting On above the miasma of its material.
  21. Most of the people [Ed Gamble and Amy Hoggart--who pose as Georgie and Poppy Carlton] encounter seem to believe they're being filmed with real British aristos on a travel-type show about the U.S. Their surprise--and polite attempts to hide it--at the things the visitors from England say is the funniest part of the show.
  22. In You, Me and the Apocalypse the destruction of the world and all life in it is imminent thanks to a comet set unalterably on a collision course with Earth. It’s a measure of the strengths of this strikingly sharp-witted comedy-drama that it’s hard to keep that looming threat of world-wide annihilation in mind, so vivid are the preoccupations of the characters racing around, fending off their private disasters.
  23. Marc still has all the bite he did in the past, still doesn’t suffer fools gladly, and still neurotically struggles with pride, masculinity and maturity; all this tinged with a new sadness that comes after a fall from success. For those who don’t know the show but appreciate comedy that doesn’t shy away from reality’s occasional harshness, add Maron to your watchlist.
  24. For all the campy craziness of Feud its message is one about the wrong people being mad at each other--a formulation with bottomless appeal and no end of examples.
  25. Inconvenient as that is, and fear takes many forms here, the first three episodes of Hap and Leonard sucked me in almost as easily as Trudy pulls Hap.
  26. A series that is improving with age.
  27. After only one episode it's clear that the more we learn about each of them, the more we will want to know.
  28. The new Killing appears to have taken a sharp turn from the kind of emotional life that enriched the last season, with its drama of a disappeared daughter. In its portrait of family grief, beautifully nuanced to the end, the series landed a dramatic punch more potent than that of the key question, "Who killed Rosie?" Itself a mystery of considerable power, and one that the latest chapter of The Killing will have to go some way to equal.
  29. The plots are complex enough to sustain mystery, and if the mean streets of Toronto aren’t all that scary, this is a good thing for a show that is trying not to shock, but to entertain.
  30. The show's astringent tone, its excursions into low comedy--scenes like the one where everybody trying to diaper the baby ends up throwing up on her, and similarly stomach-churning fun--all work to counter the sentimentality of themes like this one. They work only in part here, and in this case that's all to the good. The show is meant to be a comedy, and it is--a smart and witty one--but there's no missing, either, under all that grotesquerie, its hard-core sweetness.

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