Wall Street Journal's Scores

For 539 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 64% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 33% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 4.3 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 69
Highest review score: 100 Sherlock: Season 3
Lowest review score: 10 Prime Suspect: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 387
  2. Negative: 0 out of 387
387 tv reviews
  1. Another preposterous television premise perhaps, but one that may be comforting to viewers looking for gentle escape with dash of uplift and hope.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    [Has an] intimate, ensemble feel, without grandstanding or fussiness or mugginess. It keeps the four feeling like good company for a half-hour. [4 Aug 2005]
    • Wall Street Journal
  2. Terra Nova stakes out its own universe, and the fact that we have been on such journeys before may enhance the experience of this one.
  3. An elaborate mystery is always compelling, and here, episode after episode, we search for clues, for some sign that will let us distinguish between reality and imagination.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The series ... is graced by a quirky charm that brings to mind such classic shows as "The Rockford Files" and "Magnum. P.I." [24 Jul 2000]
    • Wall Street Journal
  4. It's Mr. Sutherland's portrayal of the father--unyielding in his effort to break through to his mute child and grasp what he's trying to say with his numbers--that is the heart of this story, the power likely to sustain this promising enterprise.
  5. As familiar as this tableau may be, Hell on Wheels finds enough beauty, danger and emotion to make some part of every episode seem fresh and worth waiting for.
  6. Mr. Connelly is one of the writers and executive producers, along with co-executive producer Eric Overmyer of “The Wire” and much other fame. They know good writing, with not a word wasted. They know cop lore and lingo and what turns viewers on about the genre. There’s a solid cast. The rest... who knows? It just happens.
  7. When all is said and done, none of these back stories is as inspiring as what happens when these people open their mouths and just sing.
  8. Nobody here offers shattering insights into the meaning of life or even of modeling. They're just among a large group of attractive women telling stories to the camera.
  9. [The Renaissance and Leonardo] bring moments of transcendent beauty to the series, which was written by David S. Goyer, and is laced with aha moments of glorious invention and the scent of mysticism. The line between mystery and bafflement is a thin one, though, and at times it is impossible to tell what's going on or who's who in the flickering torchlight. There is also a distraction, at least initially, in the portrayal of Leonardo--who comes across as a weird amalgam of Peter Pan, MacGyver and a Chippendale.
  10. Inquiring minds who liked "Lost," or "The 4400" and "The Event" will find much to feast on.
  11. The breakthroughs described in National Geographic Channel’s ambitious six-part series aren’t all equal in promise or tone.
  12. The case involves a body found in a wood and the mysteries of a Lewis Carroll manuscript, all of it strangely satisfying in its own familiar, unsuspenseful way.
  13. It's a straightforward story of iron determination to succeed against the odds—the options for drilling are now risky, and a failure means the loss of half a million dollars. But it is, beside that, a picture of a family, a portrait limited in its detail but dramatic nonetheless in its evidence of the tense relationship between the assured and driven CJ and his younger, college-educated brother.
  14. If ever a show was made for hate-viewing, it’s The Slap.... Where The Slap will be going in subsequent episodes is unclear and, mostly, irrelevant. Any and all misfortune, however, will be warmly welcomed.
  15. Cold Justice is about simple people in forgotten places, a far cry from the rich New York socialites and corporate villains of an entertainment like "Law & Order." Yet with real pain comes the promise of real closure.
  16. Whether you come away seeing Scientology as a cult that ensnares vulnerable people or as a faith of self-empowerment, the film leaves a terrible taste of too much information. This must be its point, but take heed just the same.
  17. The whole enterprise is less goosed and glitzy than NBC's successful show, "The Voice." But it's easier to concentrate that way, on the experts who know what they want and talk to the contestants with a brutal honesty that's still softer than the real world.
  18. While the tale is not always exciting and the parade of suits grows blurry at times, other times Fail takes on the urgency of an imminent nuclear disaster. Shop talk, cutting quips and appropriately ominous music add atmospherics.
  19. Following the show will require some effort for viewers accustomed to less demanding fare.
  20. What women really want was never more simply put than in the CW's compelling Vampire Diaries.
  21. This relaxing series about small-town lives is as burden-free as a day on the beach with an umbrella, a book and a breeze.
  22. Mad Men is infinitely more concerned with entertainment, an effort at which it succeeds, thanks mostly to its first-rate cast, disarming humor and period detail.
  23. Its semi-psychic hero is intriguing enough and confident enough--not everybody can sneak a hypnosis-inducing trance into an exchange with a reluctant witness as deftly as he can--to bring viewers under his spell.
  24. Mei’s dogged and often clumsy efforts to bring the truth to light ought to seem laughably naive. Yet the more we grasp the enormity of what she is up against--a relentless apparatus of which every citizen of China is aware--the harder we root for Mei and her tiny Chinese family.
  25. Those who find unremitting gloom too much to bear will be cheered to know that the show’s complicated mysteries and interpersonal dramas may provide sporadic relief. Whether the storytelling will be as good as the acting is too early to say.
  26. Sons of Tucson has a sharp edge that can be funny even as it makes you feel uneasy for laughing.
  27. Watching [Valerie’s entourage] fawn over stars, such as Seth Rogen playing himself, is still irresistibly painful, like pushing on a sore tooth. But watching Paulie G. puff with deceptive calm on his fat e-cigarette, we see through the smoke, and the laughs, the faint shape of a show going pleasantly darker.
  28. The mind reels from all the action. Most of the time it is an entertaining sensation.

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