Wall Street Journal's Scores

For 619 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 63% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 34% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 69
Highest review score: 100 The Night Of
Lowest review score: 10 Prime Suspect: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 439
  2. Negative: 0 out of 439
439 tv reviews
  1. Whether you come away seeing Scientology as a cult that ensnares vulnerable people or as a faith of self-empowerment, the film leaves a terrible taste of too much information. This must be its point, but take heed just the same.
  2. The whole enterprise is less goosed and glitzy than NBC's successful show, "The Voice." But it's easier to concentrate that way, on the experts who know what they want and talk to the contestants with a brutal honesty that's still softer than the real world.
  3. While the tale is not always exciting and the parade of suits grows blurry at times, other times Fail takes on the urgency of an imminent nuclear disaster. Shop talk, cutting quips and appropriately ominous music add atmospherics.
  4. Following the show will require some effort for viewers accustomed to less demanding fare.
  5. What women really want was never more simply put than in the CW's compelling Vampire Diaries.
  6. This relaxing series about small-town lives is as burden-free as a day on the beach with an umbrella, a book and a breeze.
  7. Mad Men is infinitely more concerned with entertainment, an effort at which it succeeds, thanks mostly to its first-rate cast, disarming humor and period detail.
  8. Its semi-psychic hero is intriguing enough and confident enough--not everybody can sneak a hypnosis-inducing trance into an exchange with a reluctant witness as deftly as he can--to bring viewers under his spell.
  9. Mei’s dogged and often clumsy efforts to bring the truth to light ought to seem laughably naive. Yet the more we grasp the enormity of what she is up against--a relentless apparatus of which every citizen of China is aware--the harder we root for Mei and her tiny Chinese family.
  10. Those who find unremitting gloom too much to bear will be cheered to know that the show’s complicated mysteries and interpersonal dramas may provide sporadic relief. Whether the storytelling will be as good as the acting is too early to say.
  11. The Night Manager is a treat. ... For all its locations, the storytelling canvas is somehow small. And there are some ludicrous plot holes and twists which nudge the The Night Manager in a campy Bond direction. But it never strays near comedy, which makes the six episodes pretty much a nonstop fear-fest.
  12. Sons of Tucson has a sharp edge that can be funny even as it makes you feel uneasy for laughing.
  13. Watching [Valerie’s entourage] fawn over stars, such as Seth Rogen playing himself, is still irresistibly painful, like pushing on a sore tooth. But watching Paulie G. puff with deceptive calm on his fat e-cigarette, we see through the smoke, and the laughs, the faint shape of a show going pleasantly darker.
  14. The mind reels from all the action. Most of the time it is an entertaining sensation.
  15. Plenty of twisty plotting, grim atmosphere and MI5 staff with a rich variety of psychological afflictions, in six parts.
  16. The result is strangely illuminating--who knew that the sight of six motorcycles parked outside a bar will keep 88% of female customers away?--and sometimes hilarious.
  17. Some viewers, accustomed to less-original TV fare, may miss having stock gags and situations rammed down their throat. "Sons & Daughters" is a savory for more discerning palates.
  18. Only one thing is certain now--the season that begins Friday has a lot to live up to.
  19. Thankfully, we are spared the misty earnestness of "Seventh Heaven."
  20. The World Wars has a few annoying habits, including pared-down descriptions that can be depressingly inane.
  21. A series both formulaic and limited in the writing department, Allegiance shows no signs of the immense ambitiousness of “The Americans.” ... The theme [of sleeper agents] does its work and carries Allegiance, as do Hope Davis, outstanding as the desperate Katya, and Scott Cohen, impressive in the role of her husband.
  22. For all its grisly nature, an involvingly sinister tale.
  23. This series... is, for all its noise, sharply plotted, visually rich, heavily informed by intrigues and intriguing characters
  24. "Ugly Betty" shines because Ms. Ferrera is luminous and credible as a character surrounded by caricatures. It's a strange mixture, but it works.
  25. Set as far as possible from the canyons of New York, the series has a cool, original look--despite its C-movie moments when burly guys in black jackets zoom down the highway to the accompaniment of country metal rock.
  26. Lipstick Jungle has some good things going for it, including actresses in roles that call for slightly more maturity than we're accustomed to, and juicy enough meanies to give it a little suspense.
  27. By the time the three episodes available for review end, a plot is thickening suspensefully, Blackbeard is exhibiting still more interesting propensities, and nobody can possibly mind not being able to figure out which woman in the Commodore's court is doing what with whom.
  28. As the series proceeds, the fiction of the bigger events--e.g. global immortality--is made believable or at least compelling by tiny touches that perfectly anticipate how society would respond.
  29. What Back to You lacks in bite, it compensates for with chemistry and pure talent. The center of it all is the relationship between Chuck and Kelly, and Mr. Grammer and Ms. Heaton work together like they have been doing it all their lives.
  30. In attempting to crawl inside the head of Mr. Madoff--given just a touch of ghoulishness by Mr. Dreyfuss--it provides solidly sordid entertainment. But it also elevates its subject into an object of sympathy.

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