Wall Street Journal's Scores

For 502 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 63% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 34% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 69
Highest review score: 100 Big Love: Season 5
Lowest review score: 10 Category 7: The End of the World: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 360
  2. Negative: 0 out of 360
360 tv reviews
  1. The series, unevenly written, frequently given to strange tonal lapses, is nevertheless lively, its dramatization of events abetted by its setting.
  2. The fine cast, both regulars and guest stars, elevates the proceedings considerably.
  3. There's more than enough absurd charm in the show, meanwhile, to make the wait worthwhile.
  4. An exhilarating burst of fresh air.
  5. What Back to You lacks in bite, it compensates for with chemistry and pure talent. The center of it all is the relationship between Chuck and Kelly, and Mr. Grammer and Ms. Heaton work together like they have been doing it all their lives.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The series ... is graced by a quirky charm that brings to mind such classic shows as "The Rockford Files" and "Magnum. P.I." [24 Jul 2000]
    • Wall Street Journal
  6. Kings, which also serves up melodrama and mystical happenings, is far more ambitious [than Aaron Spellings' shows]. Yet it can have the effect of a real sleep potion.
  7. Everyone seems to be imitating someone they saw in another gangster movie. It would be funny, if it weren't quite so tedious.
  8. "Justice" chugs along nicely, its plots gratifyingly tense, its dialogue sharp and uncluttered.
  9. It is, in its artfulness and drama, a smashing pilot and--from the evidence of the next episodes--a reliable indicator of the quality to come.
  10. A series both formulaic and limited in the writing department, Allegiance shows no signs of the immense ambitiousness of “The Americans.” ... The theme [of sleeper agents] does its work and carries Allegiance, as do Hope Davis, outstanding as the desperate Katya, and Scott Cohen, impressive in the role of her husband.
  11. No doubt Dollhouse will make a good computer game, although it looks like one already.
  12. Mr. Gad is utterly seductive. Mr. Crystal’s endlessly changing facial expressions flow into one another, each containing its own little world of loathing, of mockery. They’re perfect. He’s perfect. All that he, Mr. Gad and this series need is more coherently themed comedy of the kind in the pilot, which they don’t quite have down yet in some subsequent episodes, as one talent-squandering revel in a supermarket shows.
  13. The veracity of this series is, in the end, less important than what it says about a culture in which people blithely create online worlds on a collision course with the truth. Schadenfreude may be the lifeblood of reality television, but in "Catfish," it's fairly guilt free.
  14. Although the theme of toxic corporate greed is still there, the elongating of the story into many hours and the flattening of some mysteries for clarity on television may annoy devotees of the feature film.
  15. All of this might seem silly if it weren't for Mr. Goldblum.
  16. The action sequences that ensue are intriguing enough. The trouble is that the show doesn't trust the viewer's capacity to infer. Nor does it tolerate the slightest ambiguity. Thus we get long, dull passages of dialogue.
  17. It's clear that Mr. Sorkin's main interest in The Newsroom runs to concerns other than characters and storytelling.
  18. It's a good refresher course, but not a hugely gripping one.
  19. By the time the three episodes available for review end, a plot is thickening suspensefully, Blackbeard is exhibiting still more interesting propensities, and nobody can possibly mind not being able to figure out which woman in the Commodore's court is doing what with whom.
  20. Magic City is a little slow at getting under our figurative skin.
  21. It's one that's sharply plotted, fast-paced, with impressive performances.
  22. Like the book on which it is based, Killing Kennedy sticks pretty much to knowable facts. While this means some suspicions are not ruled out, Oswald is depicted as acting on his own--and seems able to get off several shots quickly--so there is no grassy knoll, etc. Think of it as a Cliffs Notes version of the Warren Commission.
  23. The series might be more fun if "jobmother" Hayley Taylor didn't have to stop each time she utters a harsh truth and comfort an angry or weeping spouse.
  24. Watching NBC’s Dracula isn’t always easy, and not only because its Dublin-born star, Jonathan Rhys Meyers, is often compelled to speak with a cartoonish American accent.... The biggest distraction of all may be the series’ sociopolitical construct, seemingly ripped from the headlines about Occupy Wall Street, as told to climate-change zealots and written up by Dalton Trumbo.... To its credit, this one isn’t camp and doesn’t clown around.
  25. The new Melrose Place may not be the old, but it is, all told, instantly engaging and--from the evidence--likely to remain so.
  26. The otherwise unknowable details of conversations, wonder and doubt about the apparent resurrection, and political maneuvering are filled in a respectable but usually lively way by a cast of accomplished actors.
  27. It can be genuinely scary (the pilot has a "Lovely Bones" vibe that's not for children). But it has wit too, and avoids camp.
  28. That this rich, impressively ambitious film says far more about Martha Gellhorn than about Ernest Hemingway was inevitable.
  29. While little of this is boring, the movie only sizzles and sparks when it jumps out of flashback mode and into the 1950s "present," with Ms. MacLaine as a slightly cranky and tottering but totally grand old dame.

Top Trailers