Wall Street Journal's Scores

For 600 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 63% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 34% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 69
Highest review score: 100 Parade's End
Lowest review score: 10 Category 7: The End of the World: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 427
  2. Negative: 0 out of 427
427 tv reviews
  1. It's clear that all that has made "24" so huge and deserved a success is on display again in these first smashing episodes.
  2. It's quickly clear that this skillfully sustained, sharply plotted series is a fighter saga you'll want to follow to the final bell.
  3. The cast is crowded and uniformly splendid. There's little about this captivating fusion of music, dance and potent storytelling of which the same couldn't be said.
  4. White Collar takes off in its own refreshing directions, with enough wit and sparkle to make the time fly by.
  5. It is, in short, a busy, fearlessly idealistic president (Martin Sheen) who struts through the neatly packaged, frequently deft and invariably predictable first episode of NBC's The West Wing, If the series continues at this level -- continues, that is, being handsomely produced, polished and thoroughly unexceptional in its content and aspirations, it should stand a very good chance of winning a bunch of Emmys. [22 Sept 1999, p.A32]
    • Wall Street Journal
  6. It’s certainly entertaining and well-done but, based on the first two chapters, the viewers are going to have to swallow quite a large helping of implausible sauerkraut to attain their suspension of disbelief.
  7. The series, created by Simon Block, weaves its way deftly through its engrossing plot entanglements.
  8. [A] complex, pathos-filled and very funny comedy series
  9. The characters are so vapid and thinly drawn that they glide like silhouettes through the minimalist stylings of a series crafted without affect.
  10. Plenty of twisty plotting, grim atmosphere and MI5 staff with a rich variety of psychological afflictions, in six parts.
  11. Onto this short list of tightly written and intensely acted thrillers now comes Boss.
  12. Just two episodes of this 13-part series have been made available—enough to indicate the enormous care devoted to the look of the '40s, to the primitive living quarters. We get an immediate sense, as well, of the characters likely to command attention.
  13. We may have seen film of migrating wildebeest and zebras on the Serengeti before. But Great Migrations looks at everything from new and spectacularly beautiful angles.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The first two episodes reveal a show that will benefit greatly from the time and space to develop story arcs, and to exhibit the same cinematic grandeur that distinguished “Breaking Bad.” The pace is a bit quicker, there’s more obvious humor. But the level of ambition is very much the same.
  14. It is not an exaggeration to say that the effect is of opening a treasure chest and being showered with its riches.
  15. Divorce, father issues, an aging Peter Pan—we've seen these things before. Not like this, though, with no false notes, and reactions, from pain to optimism, that feel honest and not manufactured.
  16. The truthful background of this high-stakes history makes it thrilling on a deeper level. Along with the battle scenes and other entertainments, the series reflects many challenges of today’s world.
  17. A high-hearted script awash in flinty wit and two extraordinary performances.
  18. Ultimately, what makes "Friday Night Lights" compelling is not the football or the cast. It's the accumulation of little details, like the eager faces of the pee-wee players as they meet and respectfully worship the big high-school boys whom they dream of becoming.
  19. After the briefest of moments with this new president and his wife, the realization sets in: We are already profoundly and inescapably in the grip of two extraordinary performances--the kind that seem so little like performances it’s necessary to remember from time to time that these are what they are.
  20. The Americans unfolds a thoroughly seductive tale of sleeper KGB agents.
  21. While "Broken Trail" is plot driven and not without action, it is most of all a languid elegy about the olden days on the Western ranges.
  22. The new season of Foyle's War could be the best ever.
  23. Watching "My Name Is Earl" unfold is like taking a hydrofoil ride and flying so fast above the ordinary surface of television life that when the show ends you feel dazed and amazed for hours afterward.
  24. The HBO film Grey Gardens shines new light on old subjects, and the result--including a fantastic performance from Drew Barrymore--is beyond entertaining.
  25. The grotesqueries of "Dexter" are not something that can easily be dismissed with the old "you don't have to watch" line. We don't have to watch. We do have to live among the viewers who will be desensitized, or aroused, by this show.
  26. The series is set in modern-day Rome, where the women wear tight skirts, the men are in sharp suits, and even the corruption is exquisite in its labyrinthine complexity.
  27. All the Durrells seem to find themselves in Corfu. Viewers will find them irresistible.
  28. A dark but artful and sophisticated drama.
  29. Mad Men is infinitely more concerned with entertainment, an effort at which it succeeds, thanks mostly to its first-rate cast, disarming humor and period detail.

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