Wall Street Journal's Scores

For 681 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 62% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 35% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.4 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 69
Highest review score: 100 The Night Of: Season 1
Lowest review score: 10 Graceland: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 481
  2. Negative: 0 out of 481
481 tv reviews
  1. All are reintroduced in a premiere episode that lumbers along, overpopulated, burdened by the weight of its ambitions, flattened by misbegotten detours--but one, nevertheless, that surges to life in the end.
  2. While the documentary doesn't view the day through rose-colored glasses, it lets us approach that time in a new, less painful way.
  3. The best of current food TV. ... The measurements on GBBS are in metric and Celsius. But there are no conversion tables necessary for the sentiments expressed.
  4. This is Southland, where the emotional underpinnings of the main characters give the show its outstanding grace and depth.
  5. The narrative is so intense and the details are so rich that you can forget to breathe.
  6. Ms. Williams and Ms. Robinson share an obvious comfort with each other and a confidence in their ability as performers. As a result, the show feels both spontaneous and polished like a ruby.
  7. The viewer won’t laugh much at the latest “Crown,” which suffers, as did the first season, from great swaths of tedious speechifying broken up by electric moments.
  8. The three [actresses], with Ms. Mellor’s able assistance, apply refreshing layers of honesty and genuine perplexity to their characters’ stories. Age is an engine of Girlfriends. But so is empathy.
  9. The drama unfolds in a series of flashbacks separated by many years. Hart and Cohle, no longer young, end up reporting on the past in separate interviews—a formula carried off with subtlety and high intelligence, like everything else in this detective story.
  10. The cast--including Michael Cudlitz, Ben McKenzie, Shawn Hatosy and Regina King--is perfection. No ensemble of actors on television is more stunning or exciting to watch.
  11. To watch the film’s Margaret (a sublime Hayley Atwell), is to see in full detail, the character Forster envisioned. ... In four episodes of sterling drama, Howards End has been brought fully to life on the television screen. That is no small achievement.
  12. Stunning in a different way are the three Marines at the center of the series. In their true stories and, more importantly, their individual responses to the demands of warfare, we find a perfect trinity of action, emotion and intellect.
  13. Taken together there is in these 5 1/2 hours, breathtaking in their scope and detail, nothing approaching a dull moment.
  14. It takes some while before the immensity of the history it covers dawns on a viewer of this extraordinary series, so deftly is that history--the reign of Henry VIII (Damian Lewis), Henry’s court, the dawn of the Protestant Reformation in England--woven into drama here.
  15. For their part, Messrs. Levitan and Lloyd set their ambitious sights on a rare kind of comedy, and they have, it appears, found the gold.
  16. As charming as all that is amid the macabre, Pushing Daisies is a show that only a grown-up can fully enjoy.
  17. It was impossible to imagine anything like the gripping power of Life According to Sam.... Not long into the film, it becomes difficult to look at anyone but Sam--who has by sheer force of his intelligence, his unmistakable assurance, become a magnetic presence.
  18. The question of whether Malvo is a Satan or some kind of avenging angel is what helps elevate Fargo above the realm of merely clever black comedy.
  19. The stories are complex and contemporary, with references to a remembered past. But it's easy to forget the past--the present Sherlock, droll yet naive, is so wonderfully weird.
  20. It’s the kind of storytelling--ebullient, moving, brutal and informed with human mystery--whose every chapter only whets the appetite for more. ... A smashing work all around.
  21. Beautiful, painful, almost lovingly languid but never, ever boring.
  22. It would be grim if it were not for the poetry itself, and Mr. Hollander’s soothing approximation of the way Thomas declaimed it on recordings he left behind.
  23. One welcome aspect of all this is that some of the plot threads which became so distracting last season, threatening to tip Big Love into crazy-flatulent "L.A. Law" territory, seem to be gone. There is more than enough left, along with consistently brilliant acting all over, to keep the show as mesmerizing as it ever was.
  24. A hard-charging, unfailingly suspenseful mystery whose tonnage of side dramas and veritable school of red herrings don’t, miraculously enough, undermine its strength. Though it is, on occasion, a close call.
  25. Ms. Fisher’s often naked honesty on the page and in person, made her beloved to her many fans, as the flow of tributes proved last week. Her mother, conversely, represented an old-style “show must go on” tenacity that got her through the Fisher-Taylor scandal with poise and class, and perhaps made her beloved to another kind of fan. Both camps will find much to move them in Bright Lights, especially the profound bond between its subjects and the obstacles that were overcome to make it last.
  26. The vibrant brew of upstairs-downstairs relationships is more savory now, the characters more complicated.
  27. In a film directed by Ryan Murphy and with strong performances, including those by Mr. Ruffalo, Ms. Roberts, Matt Bomer, Jim Parsons and Alfred Molina, Mr. Mantello's anguished lament ["...can't you see how important it is for us to love openly...without guilt?"] may be the most haunting.
  28. The script by Sarah Treem, the show’s co-creator with Hagai Levi, can be murky. Then again, Noah and Alison are telling their stories to a detective, apparently in the aftermath of a major event or crime. It will be a jaded viewer indeed who can resist coming back for more after the first episode ends.
  29. "House of Cards" is not without its flaws -- the occasionally heavy dribblings of symbolism, for instance, as exemplified by the regular appearance of gnawing rats. We could have figured out, without the rats, that this is black comedy. The last episode, further, is so written as to produce an Urquhart of considerably flattened character. By this time, however, it has been a superb ride for so long that no one will care. [25 Mar 1991]
    • Wall Street Journal
  30. Its vivid, cliché-free writing has always been In Treatment's singular strength. That's even truer in its riveting new season--no small accomplishment.

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