Washington Post's Scores

For 6,943 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 47% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 51% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 58
Highest review score: 100 Finding Nemo
Lowest review score: 0 Spice World
Score distribution:
6,943 movie reviews
  1. An instant slapstick classic from Disney and Steven Spielberg. Already, it's a hare's breadth away from legend. [22 June 1988]
  2. Captain Phillips is such an impressive dramatic achievement that it comes as a shock when it gets even better, during a devastating final scene in which Hanks single-handedly dismantles Hollywood notions of macho heroism in one shattering, virtually wordless sequence.
  3. Merchant and Ivory have regathered many of the cast and crew from their earlier films to work on this reproduction to exquisite effect.
  4. Misanthropic, cruel, hostile, corrupt, blasphemous and basically pretty evil. I loved it.
  5. A great American picture, full of incredible images and lasting moments.
  6. Inherent Vice unfolds so organically, so gracefully and with such humanistic grace notes that even at its most preposterous, viewers will find themselves nodding along, sharing the buzz the filmmaker has so skillfully created.
  7. It’s a richly engrossing drama, so long as you understand that it’s aiming for the head, not the gut.
  8. With its spectacular scenery, stupefying effects and epic scope, is a dream come true.
  9. An exhilarating, often mind-blowing history of surfing.
  10. In some ways Soderbergh does a much better job than Tarantino. He handles the time shifts more adroitly, always keeping us on track; he goes easy on the violence, and when he does unleash it, it's short, fast and ugly.
  11. In providing audiences a chance to bear witness to unspeakable suffering as well as dazzling defiance and human dignity, Sissako has created a film that’s a privilege to watch.
  12. Rich Hill doesn’t just make you feel like you know these boys; it makes you care about them.
  13. You know you're in the hands of a superbly gifted filmmaker when he can pull off a talking dog.
  14. Thanks to Cuarón’s prodigious gifts, Gravity succeeds simultaneously as a simple classic shipwreck narrative (albeit at zero-gravity), and as an utterly breathtaking restoration of size and occasion to the movies themselves.
  15. Only someone with intimate knowledge of the Midwest’s singular cadences, social codes and confounding emotional stew (er, covered hot dish) of aggression and politesse could pull off something as masterful, meaningful and poetic as Nebraska.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    As played by the captivating Mariana Loyola, Lucy is a life force, cut from similar cloth as the perky schoolteacher of Mike Leigh's "Happy-Go-Lucky": unsinkable, unswervable and more than a little irreverent.
  16. The narrative is lean, the supporting performances are solid, and, perhaps most crucially, the emotional tone of the piece is spot-on.
  17. Up
    The result is a soaring, touching, funny and altogether buoyant movie that lives up to its title in spirit and in form.
  18. The Piano is dark, sublime music, and after it's over, you won't be able to get it out of your head.
  19. A mesmerizing cinematic journey that is often as arduous and spare as the lives of its hard-bitten protagonists.
  20. The Class is not just the best film released thus far this year. It may be the most gripping.
  21. From the performances by Rea, Davidson and Whitaker, to Jordan's endlessly original script, to Anne Dudley's melancholy score, and Lyle Lovett's closing rendition of "Stand by Your Man," The Crying Game enthralls and amazes us. It deserves to be called great.
  22. The best heist flick since "The Usual Suspects," a perfect 10 of a movie.
  23. When viewers are ultimately released from The Hurt Locker's exhilarating vice grip, they'll find themselves shaken, energized and, more than likely, eager to see it again.
  24. In this vibrant, lyrical, graphic, sobering and finally soaring testament to aesthetic and political expression, Noujaim consistently provides light where once there was heat.
  25. A classically polished drama about repressed emotions, self delusion and protracted heartbreak, this Merchant/Ivory movie is one of the most affecting experiences of the year.
  26. It's a comic book at heart, albeit a thoroughly, grandly romantic one in the end.
  27. It's a soaring achievement, without ever leaving the ground.
  28. A smart, alert, supremely entertaining movie.
  29. Leigh has fashioned a limber style of political commentary that is part documentary, part cartoon and wholly novel in the movies.

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