Washington Post's Scores

For 1,030 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 39% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 59% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 10.6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 54
Highest review score: 100 The Sopranos: Season 3
Lowest review score: 0 Identity: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 428
  2. Negative: 0 out of 428
428 tv reviews
  1. Accidentally on Purpose doesn't have the smarts to be the salvation of a genre, but neither does it look like the torpedo to sink the ship. Not great, but nothing heinous.
  2. "Underbelly" does indeed aim narrow, likely appealing only to those who are pregnant or have recent memories of it.
  3. There's perhaps the coppiest cop show of the century so far, the soppy and self-satirizing CBS melodrama Blue Bloods, about an entire family--"the Reagans" yet!--involved in the crime biz.
  4. Unlike the misuse of celebrity willingness on "The Marriage Ref," "Who Do You Think You Are?" has a purer heart and an underlying appreciation for marriage, family, longevity and memory. Also to its credit, it encourages people to go to libraries and museums and to look for things online besides the latest Perez Hilton gossip.
  5. As Russ, Faxon is a one-note.... but it’s Greer’s performance as Lina (as well as Jenny Slate’s supporting role as Russ’s friend, Jess) that keeps Married alive.
  6. Mad Men is that rare thing that can be as infuriating as it is perfect. I’ve gone back and forth (and hot and cold) on it as much as a critic can; I warmed to it last season but feel a familiar chill this time.
  7. If Rectify was winnowed down to the length of a feature film and shown at a festival, we could better judge whether or not it accomplishes what it set out to do. Delivered this way, as a meandering, weekly TV show (with commercial breaks), it has spread itself too thin.
  8. The basic formula is by now so groaningly familiar, and the premise so weak and weary, that there's only the "reality" part of this docu-game, or whatever it ought to be called, to tempt one's interest, and that not much.
  9. "Family Guy" fans, prepare to be disappointed: "American Dad" looks a lot like its predecessor, but it lacks the zing and smarts that made "Family Guy" a cult hit. [1 May 2005]
    • Washington Post
  10. No one can survive Surviving Jack’s hollow and formulaic dialogue, which is bursting with jokes that are half-funny at best.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The show is enlightening, but dull.
  11. It's a handsome study in perfect mediocrity.
  12. With the line between documentary and amusement-park ride now crossed, it's easy for a critic to start noticing Vietnam in HD's other narrative and technical shortcuts with filler and stock footage, splicing in wherever needed the images we have seen before, including those familiar payload-perspective views of bombs being dropped over the hills and villages.
  13. It's D'Elia and the other cast members who rescue the show from a wretched Whitney overload.
  14. Once assembled, Mob City has a slick sheen and a sure trigger finger that unleashes a stream of bullets. But the guns here are the kind that go “ho-hum” instead of “bang-bang.”
  15. It's a whole lot of techno-hooey, relying on screenwriter-friendly leaps of logic. Emerson turns out to be a one-note actor, but Caviezel is appealing in a particle-board sort of way.
  16. For the most part, Girls is still wickedly written and, for some viewers, the best hate-watch around. Yet it too easily runs on fumes from a hipster era (circa 2012) that is already ossifying.
  17. You'll vaguely remember several shows that went pretty much like this one.
  18. Deception falls prey to the exhaustive method of too-much-storytelling, adding layer upon layer of mini-mysteries and twists until the weary viewer needs a detailed map to keep track--or turns off the show entirely.
  19. It’s difficult to escape the show’s plasticky veneer and misplaced exuberance.
  20. The pilot episode is stylish and swiftly paced, but that’s all it is, and despite some intriguing plot twists, there’s not a lot of motivation to keep coming back.
  21. SyFy routinely demonstrates that today’s tricks have gotten too easy, which is why Dominion feels like it is unintentionally telling a separate story of a world in which humanity is held captive by quickie CGI.
  22. Often engaging, inventive, well acted and wickedly funny, Picket Fences keeps shooting itself in the foot with tastelessness disguised as daring. Irritating as it may frequently be, however, Picket Fences also seems the new fall drama most likely to become habit-forming. You may love it, you may hate it, but you're liable to be hooked. [18 Sept 1992, p.D1]
    • Washington Post
  23. It prefers action at points where it could really stand to slow down and build out a slightly more creative story. It's the very definition of a guilty-pleasure series.
  24. The show is almost drowning in detail, minute detail, so that the basic plot line and its resolution are a chore to follow and figure out. [22 Sep 2004]
    • Washington Post
  25. It's precisely what the title says: just new iterations of the same spit-up and teething jokes.
  26. Seriously, it is hard to take the show very seriously. It does traffic in issues and hot topics--and protests, in its way, the general corruption of the legal system--but not in particularly fresh or original terms.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Realism, in other words, is not the show's strong suit; pretty much all of it (the detecting, the lawyering, the examining and the reporting) can be described as "lite.
  27. Now it's a little bit "Lost" meets "Star Trek: Voyager." Why are we here? How do we get home? Stay tuned, if it's your thing.
  28. Despite the prestigious presence of stars such as Harvey Keitel, Michael Imperioli, Lisa Bonet and Gretchen Mol, Life on Mars, a new ABC crime drama, comes off as naggingly undistinguished.

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